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1941

WHERE is (or was) SOMERVILLE ?

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I just dug out my build card for my '41 Continental. I shows that

the car was assembled NOV 7 1940 and shipped Nov 11 to SOMERVILLE.

Can anyone shed some light on this? Was this a distrubution center?

Mike

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There's a Somerville in Massachusetts, suburb of Boston......

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....And Also Texas, Tennessee, New Jersey, Ohio..........

I am thinking there had to be a main Ford / Lincoln distibution center in one of these Somervilles

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I can say with virtually 100% certainty it was not Somerville, Texas. While it is a town, it is little more than a wide place in the road. No evidence there was ever a car dealership of any nature there. Its larger neighbor a couple of miles North is Lyons which one could categorize as a double wide spot in the road, never had a dealership either. Neither one large enough to even have their own town drunk, they have to share!

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I can say with virtually 100% certainty it was not Somerville, Texas. While it is a town, it is little more than a wide place in the road. No evidence there was ever a car dealership of any nature there. Its larger neighbor a couple of miles North is Lyons which one could categorize as a double wide spot in the road, never had a dealership either. Neither one large enough to even have their own town drunk, they have to share!
Nor Ohio.

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The reason I was thinking OHIO , is on the buildsheet , upper left corner

after the abbreviated "Somer" it looks like a comma, then the letter"O".

Also, if they abbreviated Somerville, it was because OTHER vehicles

were shipped there.

Mike

post-39370-143141860278_thumb.jpg

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Mike,

Somerville Massachusetts for sure. Look in the front of our green 36-48 parts book and you will find listed all 34 district offices of Lincoln, Ford Motor Co. I have a late 40 and you have an early 41, both Capri Blue - great color!

Neat seeing your card...

Jim

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History: Assembly Square, a unique neighborhood district with a land area of 145 acres, is so named after the Ford Motor assembly plant that opened in 1926 and was an important employer in the Boston Metropolitan Area, particularly during World War II.The assembly plant was one of many industrial businesses that thrived in Assembly Square during the 1900's. Boston & Maine Railroad also owned large tracts of land in the district and many of the businesses received shipments by rail. The land was crisscrossed by spur tracks and there were few roadways. The Ford Motor Plant closed in 1958 and by the late 1970's, a number of other industrial businesses had closed as well.

In 1980, the City of Somerville declared the Assembly Square District to be blighted, substandard, and decadent and adopted a 20-year urban renewal plan. The cornerstone of the urban renewal plan was the rehabilitation of the former auto assembly plant into a retail mall known as the "Assembly Square Mall".

Edited by Jim Zephyr (see edit history)

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Thank you Jim - Sure enough there it is on page II !

Mystery solved. Now all I have to do is trace back from 1940 to 1986 !

Thanks again

Mike

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Thanks for taking the time to add all that history...and the photo.

History: Assembly Square, a unique neighborhood district with a land area of 145 acres, is so named after the Ford Motor assembly plant that opened in 1926 and was an important employer in the Boston Metropolitan Area, particularly during World War II.The assembly plant was one of many industrial businesses that thrived in Assembly Square during the 1900's. Boston & Maine Railroad also owned large tracts of land in the district and many of the businesses received shipments by rail. The land was crisscrossed by spur tracks and there were few roadways. The Ford Motor Plant closed in 1958 and by the late 1970's, a number of other industrial businesses had closed as well.

In 1980, the City of Somerville declared the Assembly Square District to be blighted, substandard, and decadent and adopted a 20-year urban renewal plan. The cornerstone of the urban renewal plan was the rehabilitation of the former auto assembly plant into a retail mall known as the "Assembly Square Mall".

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