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Is it possible to identify a Pre-1930's car with only the frame? If so how?

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Me and my friends found a old car possibly a Ford Model T in the woods by my house, and we were just wondering how to identify it for sure? The problem is we just found the bare frame of the car and various parts, all of them are rusted and scattered. We want to know if anything is notable and or worth something? Any help, even the smallest bit would be appreciated. Thank you!

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Me and my friends found a old car possibly a Ford Model T in the woods by my house, and we were just wondering how to identify it for sure? The problem is we just found the bare frame of the car and various parts, all of them are rusted and scattered. We want to know if anything is notable and or worth something? Any help, even the smallest bit would be appreciated. Thank you!

Model T Fords and Model A Fords have front and rear transverse springs. Most other cars had springs that are parallel to the frame rails. Here is a typical early Ford frame. If you are having trouble posting photos here, send them to me and I will post them for you here. John

keiser31@charter.net

post-37352-143141846824_thumb.jpg

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I have an old ford frame, was modified to be a fishing boat trailer.  Got the boat home, off the trailer, and what a surprise!  Can someone help? Thanks

Frame length = 87"

Frame width = 23 1/2"

Outside spindle to outside spindle = 57 1/2"

 

 

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Wow, looks like those wild looking aftermarket springs on a Model T Ford chassis.

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I took a guess from faint memory and web searched "Hassler Model T"

 

 

hassler.jpg

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Great boat trailer, can you post some photos of the hubs so we can tell if they are 26-27 wire wheel types or modified wood wheel hubs. Bob

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Hi everyone. We have two chassies and are having a hard time indentifying them. The yellow one has wooden spokes. 

 

Any info would be great. :)

 

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You might have to take the stuff off the rusty one for us to actually see it?

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The yellow frame appears to be a very early luxury car or possibly a truck frame. No front brakes puts it before 1923. Could be pre WW1. The wheels look too spindley for a truck now that I think about it. That rear axle with the rod clamped to it suggests a certain car but I can't remember which.

 

The other is a truck frame probably from the fifties.

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The rusty frame looks a lot like a large car that had some Buffalo wire wheels on it. It looks similar to 1929 Chrysler the way it has that style of bumper mounts and cross bar in front. It IS NOT a 1929 Chrysler frame, but similar.

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As said, need to take the stuff off the rusty frame and post some clearer photos. It appears to have #6 Buffalo wire wheel hubs on it, which could make it a late-20s Cadillac, or perhaps Lincoln.

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Yep....may be Cadillac. Here is a similar 1928 Cadillac frame. Notice the exact frame horn ends and tubular cross member in front....

1928 Cadillac frame.jpg

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
  • Like 1

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The rusty frame has, what looks to be knock-offs on the rear. If there is an aluminum plate in the center of one, It may say Auburn.  The front brake drum looks to be 28-30 Auburn. 

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6 minutes ago, Curti said:

The rusty frame has, what looks to be knock-offs on the rear. If there is an aluminum plate in the center of one, It may say Auburn.  The front brake drum looks to be 28-30 Auburn. 

It has those hubs on the front, too. It actually looks a lot like the 1929 LaSalle front end and hubs I used to have.

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The yellow thing is a Stanley steamer, I'm guessing mid-teens. Note how the ring gear is smack dab in the middle of the rear axle, and the full elliptical springs on the back. Also note the solid cross members - there's nowhere to put a transmission or driveshaft. Stanleys didn't use them. The engine attaches directly to the rear axle housing - it looks like it might still be there.  A very nice find.

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3 hours ago, mickthecat said:

The yellow thing is a Stanley steamer, I'm guessing mid-teens. Note how the ring gear is smack dab in the middle of the rear axle, and the full elliptical springs on the back. Also note the solid cross members - there's nowhere to put a transmission or driveshaft. Stanleys didn't use them. The engine attaches directly to the rear axle housing - it looks like it might still be there.  A very nice find.

 

Not disputing what you say but does a Stanley have a 'clutch' pedal?

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NZCarNerd,

Good question. I searched online and found a Stanley Owner's Manual; it turns out that the second pedal is for reverse.

A Stanley owner once told me that these cars can go as fast in reverse as in forward, at least in theory.

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Stanley had a pedal for the steam cutoff and for the brakes. The engine was built into the rear axle and had an oval shaped base as shown in the picture. There was a reciprocating rod that came off the rear axle and drove pumps for water, fuel, and oil. It may be a Stanley from the early 20s. The first Stanleys had full elliptic springs all around and hickory reaches between the front and rear axle.

 

They reversed by adjusting the steam valves on the engine to make it run backwards so yes, you had the same power and speed in reverse if you wanted it.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)

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On 3/27/2017 at 4:10 PM, mickthecat said:

The yellow thing is a Stanley steamer, I'm guessing mid-teens. Note how the ring gear is smack dab in the middle of the rear axle, and the full elliptical springs on the back. Also note the solid cross members - there's nowhere to put a transmission or driveshaft. Stanleys didn't use them. The engine attaches directly to the rear axle housing - it looks like it might still be there.  A very nice find.

 

I won't lie.... if that Stanley chassis was mine... I'd be building one heck of a "Steam Speedster" :)

 

Very nice find indeed.

Edited by Chase392 (see edit history)

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Can anyone tell me what car this frame off of I found in in the woods behind my property and I have no idea what it came off of

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Edited by Rusty 428
Photo didn’t upload (see edit history)

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Can you please post some closer detail photos of the front frame horns and the rear area?

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