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32 DL Window Frames


Taylormade

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This is the kind of annoying problem that always seems to crop up during a restoration. Because I tend to get obsessed with one thing and become sidetracked, I thought I'd seek help here instead of on my rebuild thread. I removed all the interior window surrounds, or frames, the other day. Not a difficult job - take the screws out, remove the top piece, lift out the bottom piece. As I did the job, I found that getting the top, upsidedown U-shaped frame out was a bit of a problem. The lower ends of the piece bound on the top of the sill piece. It took some force to pry them out, and the edges of the lower ends scraped across the top of the sill and it left some marks. Now I'm going to redo the woodgraining in the original patterns with the usual method of basecoat, wood pattern, then clearcoat. My question is - how do I get the frames back in without scratching the heck out of the top of the sill piece? The new woodgraining with it's clearcoat is going to be even thicker than the original. I know when I set the bottom sill piece in place and then try to install the upper frame, it's going to scratch up my new woodgrain.

woodscratch_zps96ca0f22.jpg

I can post some actual pictures tonight if this isn't making sense.

I don't want to trim the lower legs of the upper frame - the factory designed things for a reason and I don't want to end up with a non-original gap. Anyone have any suggestions? Anyone who may have encountered this problem in the past? My only possible solution is to try and place a very thin sheet of plastic between the two and hopefully pull it out once things were in place, but with my luck it would probably get jammed in there and rip up the finish as I pulled it free. Any help is more than welcome.

RT

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I'm afraid there's too much force between the pieces for a trash bag to work. It would probably just tear. I need to come up with something very thin, very strong and very slippery.

Don't you wonder how they did it at the factory?

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You understandably do not want to end up with a gap but could you not trim/file down the legs just enough to clear the sill without scratching? If you could take off a little at a time and offer up the frame until you are happy with it and make an allowance for the thickness of your new wood grain, I doubt there would be a noticeable gap if any.

It does make you wonder what they did in the factory though.

Ray.

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I like the teflon tape idea. Freezing might br a little tough on the new paint.;) And as usual, the fly in the ointment is the fact that the car is currently 140 miles away at the body shop and the frames are home with me. Now I know why a parts car comes in handy.

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Crash wrap is available at most any large bodyshop, it is often used to cover open areas like broken windshields that are in a car that sits outside. It is Very sticky on one side but never become a permanent bond and the opposite side or the outward side is slippery where water just beads off it.

Walking up to it and trying to poke a hole with your finger is a big challenge, very strong.

I am assuming it may not be cheap enough to justify here to buy a roll so try your local dealerships.

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I do know for certain that the easiest way I have found to install them is to set the sill first. Then set the ends of the upper band onto the sill and press with the palms at the top corners to pop them into place. If you can have someone hold the bottom ends in place while you pop the upper ends in place, you are less likely to damage the sill.

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Another thought; if the top edge is hidden from view then perhaps material could be taken from there. Just enough to allow the upper frame to slide over the protected sill. The correct position would then be established when it is screwed home.

Ray

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I do know for certain that the easiest way I have found to install them is to set the sill first. Then set the ends of the upper band onto the sill and press with the palms at the top corners to pop them into place. If you can have someone hold the bottom ends in place while you pop the upper ends in place, you are less likely to damage the sill.

There ya go!

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