Sign in to follow this  
aussiesteve

1930 engine

Recommended Posts

Hi, hopefully someone can help me. I am rebuilding my 1930 Chrysler 66 engine it has 3 1/8 bore. I would like to know when all main bearing caps are tensioned down without the bearings what should the inside measurement be so when it's line bored, we can get all the caps to pull down evenly. Any help will be greatly appreciated. Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Steve, I am also rebuilding a 1930 Chrysler 66 engine and it has a 3 1/8 bore as well. We are in Grafton in NSW and have had the car for about 5 weeks and have finished the gearbox and now doing the engine. If you want to contact me and we can have a chat would be fine - I have the manual for the book where I may be able to find something to help you - Wally

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Gentlemen, I'm Gary from Hallett Cove, South Australia.

Sorry to bombard you with questions but you may know the answers, As I'm also attempting to restore a 1930 Chrysler 66. I've just tried to get the motor back together as it was not complete. Pistons are good, The Sliver Dome head has been refaced and returned to the block with a new copper gasket & nuts torqued up.

I have a Stromberg U1 carby does not fit, as I believe it should be a U2. I've modified it to fit, however the fuel bowl on the carby is real close to the steering box. Can you confirm i need a U2 - or is there other carby model options? I've seen a U2 on ebay, but it's $600 and need to be sure this is the best option!

I dropped the sump and cleaned the oil pick up 'gauze'. it was clogged, but OK now.

Can you get replacement oil filter canisters? The one that I have seems to be totally sealed, except entry pipe on top and return line to the block on bottom. I have seen picture of other units that seem to have a lid on top, suggesting you can open them up?

I've also wired it up to hopefully turn it over and start it using a 12 volt coil. I've got new Champion D16 spark plugs, and set the point gap to .020. There does not seem to be a condenser in the distributor - was there originally a condenser, if so, where was it placed.

The starter turns over the engine quite well, remembering that it's 6 volt and using it with caution!

My AC fuel pump needs a new diaphragm, which is on order.

Thanks for your help in advance, Gary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The carburetor should be a Stromberg U2, the U1 is correct for a 1928 Model 62.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Gentlemen, I'm Gary from Hallett Cove, South Australia.

Sorry to bombard you with questions but you may know the answers, As I'm also attempting to restore a 1930 Chrysler 66. I've just tried to get the motor back together as it was not complete. Pistons are good, The Sliver Dome head has been refaced and returned to the block with a new copper gasket & nuts torqued up.

I have a Stromberg U1 carby does not fit, as I believe it should be a U2. I've modified it to fit, however the fuel bowl on the carby is real close to the steering box. Can you confirm i need a U2 - or is there other carby model options? I've seen a U2 on ebay, but it's $600 and need to be sure this is the best option!

I dropped the sump and cleaned the oil pick up 'gauze'. it was clogged, but OK now.

Can you get replacement oil filter canisters? The one that I have seems to be totally sealed, except entry pipe on top and return line to the block on bottom. I have seen picture of other units that seem to have a lid on top, suggesting you can open them up?

I've also wired it up to hopefully turn it over and start it using a 12 volt coil. I've got new Champion D16 spark plugs, and set the point gap to .020. There does not seem to be a condenser in the distributor - was there originally a condenser, if so, where was it placed.

The starter turns over the engine quite well, remembering that it's 6 volt and using it with caution!

My AC fuel pump needs a new diaphragm, which is on order.

Thanks for your help in advance, Gary

Hi Gary

I'm over 40 years out of date with my 66, but here's a few comments:

1. Don't know the Stromberg U1, but in the 60s, I replaced a crumbling U2 with a Carter BB1 carburettor. I think I had to make minor changes to the manifold bolt hole spacings to make it fit. It performed perfectly for many years after that.

2. Yes, I also found the oil pickup gauze blocked. I suspect today's use of more modern oils and more frequent changes will keep it clean. Incidentally, I used to find that very steep inclines would lead to loss of oil pressure, so there was a Chrysler sump design problem there. Maybe make sure that your sump is always just slightly overfull.

3. I could buy sealed replacement oil filter canisters 40 years ago.. they were compatible, but not quite as large as the original.

4. The distributor condenser was bolted to the outside of the distributor.

5. Re the fuel pump: Because of its close proximity to the exhaust pipe, vapour lock was a common problem. The quick fix used to be either an asbestos wrap (not smart any more!) or a dousing of the fuel pump with cold water when the problem occurred. The current owner of my old 66 fixed this by installing an electric fuel pump somewhere in the pipe from the tank.

Regards, Bruce

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gary - we also are in Australia at Grafton in the north of NSW and my husband would like to have a chat with you as he is doing the motor on our 66 also - when I saw your avatar photo was amazed as it looks like the car is the same as the one we bought - same colour as well - our email is wiscott@bigpond.com if u wish to contact us and we can perhaps give you a phone call - am hoping we may help each other - we have finished the Chrysler 52 (1928 model) which has been in the family since 1937 and now started on the 66 - regards Wally

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this