Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Taylormade said:

I’m sure Bob’s stands by their work.  I did the boiling water test when they first sent it back and it was dead on.  Thanks, it’s a good tip and an easy way to test the gauge.

 

1 hour ago, zeke01 said:

If I may offer a suggestion, test the temperature gauge in a pot of boiling water before installing. Stand over the bulb and see if you smell any chemical smell. Those bulbs don’t always seal up completely.  Knowledge gained the hard way. Zeke

 

 

100% correct on both points, I tested, came back dead, both fuel sending and temp, sent back and Bruce at Bob's made it good, and super fast.

Edited by Surf City '38 (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes you get lucky, but what happened today was downright ridiculous.  I went to the local parts store, where we are still welcome as long as we wear a mask, and bought some gasket material.  I couldn't find anything that was quite as thin as I wanted, so I settled for something a little thicker - 3/64th of an inch.  More about that later.  Well, the sun was out and I've been inside for the last two weeks, so I decided to take a short ride out in the country and get some fresh air.  We live in a tiny town in Central Illinois, so it takes about four minutes to get into the woods and cornfields.  I took a narrow country road I'd never noticed before and was cruising along when I went over a rickety old bridge spanning a little creek.  Out of the corner of my eye I spotted a rusty something or other buried in the creek bed.   It appeared to be automotive.   I pulled over and walked back to see what was up.  Sure enough there was the battered cowl of an early thirties car down there.  i started to go back and get my phone so I could take a picture of it and realized I'd left it at home.  i wasn't happy about that, but I went back and half walked, half slide down the creek bank to the wreckage.  It turned out to be what was left of a Chrysler, barely identifiable by the firewall tag.  There wasn't much left, the bottom having been submerged for years and totally rusted away.  Nothing was salvageable - or so I thought.  Then I took a closer look at the firewall and noticed something familiar poking through from inside.  It was the ends of the firewall clips I had been searching for - these things...

 

327137830_Dash3.thumb.jpg.7f2c20f4880ced129655bda12a8fda81.jpg

 

I couldn't believe it!  How they had survived all this time is beyond me.  I got the cowl turned over and managed to get six of the little buggers out, more than I needed.  I'm going to go back and get a picture of the cowl when I get a chance - it still bugs me that I forgot my phone.  Here are the little beauties - lots of surface rust, but they are still solid and perfectly usable once I clean them up.

 

1079239053_Dash2.thumb.jpg.3d23a20d6493cdde7cd33d73f00764cd.jpg

 

On a more mundane note, I was curious to see if my C and C machine would cut clean gaskets from the thicker material I brought home.  No problem.

 

1914816022_gasket1.thumb.jpg.8d895eab399ed1ee8aa38a1a79733bc9.jpg

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WOW! Talk about the planets aligning! What an odd, but wonderful score. I have found some odd stuff. One time while in Death Valley I found two radiator shells up in the hills around Panamint City. I had a 1926 Chrysler 58 and my 1931 Dodge at the time. The shells were for a Chrysler and a 1931 Dodge....nothing else from those cars were there.

57b1177c591ca_Picture1969.jpg.7371f064ada8042a032264138f6a5308.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Taking a poll.  I’m ready to put the gaskets on the u-joints and put the drivetrain together.  The gaskets are 3/64 of an inch thick and rather soft and crushable.  They are there to contain the grease in the u-joint, which is thick, but can weep fairly thin liquid if left standing for a period of time.  Do I need to apply  gasket cement to the gaskets, or do I just put them on dry?  The cement always seems to make a total mess no matter how carefully I try to apply it, but safety is probably the best policy.  What do you think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was my thought, but if I have to take this u-joint off one more time I may run screaming down the street in frustration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would add a very thin coat of 30wt oil to the gasket to seal it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want to be confident of having no leak then some sealant is the best bet (regardless of technicalities).  I’ve always used hylomar, if you want it to be an even coating they do a spray on version.  If it works for Rolls-Royce on jet engines I’m sure it can work for Dodge:)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I liked the sound of the spray on Hylomar until I saw the price - sixty bucks for an aerosol can.  I bought some Permatex Aviation Sealer for four bucks.  The Hylomar overspray would have cost me that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Crikey, that’s nuts - you can get it for ~20 here.  Still expensive but it is good stuff:) permatex is good too.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And I’m sure you’re correct, I was ready to buy a can as soon as I saw your post.  Why it’s four times as much here makes no sense.  Thanks for the suggestion, though, I wasn’t brushing you off, I’m just too broke to try it!  😀

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Just spent many hours going through this project. Your doing an incredible job and it's turning out beautiful. I commend you for your persistence.  Thanks for taking the time to post the excellent photos. 

Now for the bad part, there is no way in heck this is going to turn out original if it doesn't leak oil or grease. ☺️

 

Edited by Fossil (see edit history)
  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don’t worry, the transmission still weeps a bit of oil and I’m just going to live with it.  And thanks for your kind comments.  I hope my trials and tribulations have helped you and others with their cars.  Lord knows folks on this forum have helped me immensely.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s a great forum isn’t it. I have had so much help from people......even just a photo sent to me has helped more than some people could ever imagine. Doesn’t sound much, but when your not sure, these things can make all the difference.

Keep up the great work.


Ian

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can vouch for that Ian. Anthony Bryant aka Gundog has been of immense help to me with my 2249 Touring. As you said a photo or some measurements are just the ants pants especially when there was so much of the rear part of my car that was missing  These forums get a big thumbs up from me 

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This part of the restoration is about as interesting as watching paint dry - which is about all I did this morning.  I'm getting ready to put the windows back in and the exciting job of cleaning up the metal glass channels fell to me.  They were actually in pretty good shape, just some surface rust that came off with a wire brush and a little elbow grease.

 

A close shot of the channel.  Still some factory black paint left on the surface.

 

IMG_1408.thumb.jpg.75f21e48b5539d706a0e8b73b87003ee.jpg

 

About halfway through.  The channel is cleaning up nicely.  notice the Syracuse decal applied by PO Phil Kennedy back in the sixties.

 

IMG_1411.thumb.jpg.62455a2f08c5bee669c682186582744c.jpg

 

Fresh coat of black paint and they are ready to install.  Pretty hard to get a decent picture of this - clear glass and black paint.

 

IMG_1419.thumb.jpg.bf026687553ba7bb501cbd36d1823306.jpg

 

The winding mechanisms are in really good shape.  They just need a bit of cleaning.  What would you use as light lubrication for these?  White lithium grease?

 

IMG_1409.thumb.jpg.e657101caca815615a458e85d540cca7.jpg

 

IMG_1428.thumb.jpg.61b5f5c6de5b069d647764202ebf8e46.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's what I use.

Its even available in a spray can.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made a large commitment yesterday and bought a ton of stuff from Restoration Specialties and Supply.  Supposedly arriving Friday are new smooth grain top material, top padding, firewall panel board, door panel board, jute underpayment, and an assortment of rubber grommets.  I’m also getting new door glass for the driver and passenger front side windows which were cracked.  So now I can get my firewall pad finished and finally install my restored dash gauge cluster and all three cables (throttle, choke and free-wheeling) and get the under dash wiring hooked up.  I have also cleaned and painted the window channels and hope to get all the side windows in this week.  My outer door handles have been back from Paul’s Chrome for a bit and they will go on once the windows are in.  June should be an interesting month.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kinda never ending aint it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Question.  I'm in the process of installing the windows and have come across a problem.  The lower area between the window glass and the body is open maybe a 1/8th of an inch.  Any water that gets on the glass will run down the window and into the door with nothing to stop it.  When I took the car apart there was nothing there, but I assume a strip should be installed in there to prevent water from getting in.  Restoration Supply has what they call Belt Weatherstrip  which appears to be what I'm looking for, but I can see no way of installing it short of gluing it in place.  They also have nothing specific for 1932, only going back to 1935. The back door windows have two rivets just hanging there that appear to have mounted something, but there is no sign of any mounting on the front window or the small back windows.  i want to keep Daphne looking authentic, but also want to keep water from getting inside my doors.  Has anyone solved this problem or can someone give me a clue as to what is installed in their cars?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I had a similar issue on my 27 sedan and had exactly the same thoughts. What I did is found a rubber mould that I fixed to the bottom of the window before I put it in. So basically when you roll the window up it came up and jammed in between the glass and the inside of the window frame. It’s not perfect but I’m sure it stops a bit of water getting down there and you can’t even see it unless you’re looking for it. 
mill take some pictures this morning when I go out into the garage. It might help explain a bit better what I mean. 
The only problem with doing it this way was when the window is down even a little it doesn’t seal at all. But I couldn’t see any other options. 

Edited by Mattml430 (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now