Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

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Working on the steering box.  Not very visual when it comes to photos.  I also put the taillight together and just got my resorted temp and fuel guages ready to put back in the instrument panel.  Super cold here at the moment which makes working in the garage almost impossible.  Thanks for thinking about me - still plugging along.

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I'm putting in my windows and discovered I'm missing a few small parts.  This is for my 1932 Dodge Brothers DL sedan, but I assume these were used on many other cars.  They are the little rollers that prevent the window glass from rattling.  I have one and need three more.  They were apparently only used on the front window glass, one outside, one inside just below the window opening.  I also assume they had a rubber roller over the steel shaft - mine is long gone.  If anyone has any extras or knows of a source, let me know.

 

Here is what they look like.

 

Roller.thumb.jpg.1c17ae5d3eb57bd1df6f294b79af0222.jpg

 

Thanks.

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31 minutes ago, Taylormade said:

I'm putting in my windows and discovered I'm missing a few small parts.  This is for my 1932 Dodge Brothers DL sedan, but I assume these were used on many other cars.  They are the little rollers that prevent the window glass from rattling.  I have one and need three more.  They were apparently only used on the front window glass, one outside, one inside just below the window opening.  I also assume they had a rubber roller over the steel shaft - mine is long gone.  If anyone has any extras or knows of a source, let me know.

 

Here is what they look like.

 

Roller.thumb.jpg.1c17ae5d3eb57bd1df6f294b79af0222.jpg

 

Thanks.

It looks like you might be able to slit a tube of rubber down the side and slip it on and glue it onto the roller.

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Posted (edited)

When it comes to cutting gaskets, I'm about as bad as it gets.  We have a Cricut machine which we use to cut out paper, cardboard and light plastic.  I use it to build models.  It makes very accurate cuts and can cut perfect circles.  When I was working on a project with my daughter, I suddenly realized that the machine would be ideal for making gaskets, so I thought I'd give it a try.

 

This is the machine.  It's just really just a C and C machine and works cutting on two axis.

 

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I took what was left of the gasket to my Steering box and taped it to a sheet of paper.

 

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Then I scanned it and brought it into Adobe Illustrator and used it as a pattern to make the shape of the gasket.  I set it up so I could cut two at a time, just in case.  The artwork was saved as a PNG file with a transparent background.

 

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Then I put the files into the Cricut's software program and had it cut the gaskets.  This is on cardstock, but it will cut gasket paper just as well.  I was amazed at the fit.  And the cuts are absolutely clean and flat.

 

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It's always great when a plan works out.

 

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)
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It is great to see the progress on this car and that man and machine are together.

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Put the steering box back together today.  The bearings as races were in pretty good condition so I just cleaned them up and then repacked them before assembly.

IMG_1200.thumb.jpg.ab1f1c37e4fcea5c90bc2c44691557e5.jpg

 

 

I figured it would be a pretty straightforward job as it's just a sandwich, with the bottom race already in place (how you get it out of there is beyond my pay grade and it didn't need to be removed, anyway) the bottom bearing, the worm gear, the other bearing and then the upper race.  The upper race proved to be more of a pain then I expected.  If I'd had a large piece of pipe I could have probably done better, but the local hardware stores are all closed because of you know what, so I had to try a tap it in slowly with a small drift and a hammer.  Tapping is probably a bit mild, as it took a lot of force to get it started.  About the time I was about to give up and call it a day, my final "tap" sent it down into place.  You can  just see it down there in this shot.

 

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The steering shaft and worm gear turned smoothly so I guess i got things right.

 

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There are no other bearings in this Gemmer box, just the bushings for the gear shaft.  Both the shaft and the bushings are in good shape.  Clearance is about .002 as near as I can measure.

 

I just made the gasket for this application, so it's time for cleanup and paint, and then final assembly.  I'm using Corn head grease as lubricant.

 

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I did have one question.  The outer steering tube screws into the steering box.  i discussed my problems with the threads in an earlier post.  According to the owner's manual, you screw in this outer tube to adjust the load on the bearings.  It says to tighten it down with the front wheels off the ground until you feel a slight drag on the steering wheel, then back it off a quarter turn.  This makes some sense, but as hard as it was to get the bearing race in there, it seems as if you tightened it down and then backed it off, the race wouldn't back off as it's not attached to the outer column.  Maybe just using the steering for a bit backs it off, but I'm a bit confused as to how that would work.  They don't give any play specifications as to bearing clearance in this unit.

 

Going to start putting the windows back in tomorrow.  

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Since I need to get my dash wired, I finally got around to addressing the problem of my firewall pad.  This is very visible in my car and the original is in really bad shape and has also separated.  The black surface faces inside and is visible.  There are also many unnecessary holes drilled in the firewall, so I will have to determine which holes should be punched in the new pad.  I found a company called Quiet Ride Solutions that will make me a new pad.  They didn't have a pattern for a 32DL, but I told them I had the original pad and they offered to make me a new pad based on my old one and only charge me half price since I was supplying them with a pattern for this model.  At this point I know I should have filled the excess holes in the firewall, but I'm just going to install rubber plugs and call it a day since I would like to drive Daphne before I die.

 

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5 hours ago, Taylormade said:

 I found a company called Quiet Ride Solutions that will make me a new pad.  

 

Great company and if its not right, they will make it right, on them....be sure to get the kick panels too, that way the patterns will match.

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Kevin BC here

 

Just as well the bearings in your box were in good shape, I replaced mine in my 1930 DC 8, a couple of years back , got the bearings, and outer cones OK but got the last inner cone avaiable  in Australia, so had to have the other made, but all turned out good, my point being that if you see bearings & cones in your travels grab a set. I did find that the cones & bearings appear to be the same or very similar as in the old grey Fergi tractor , so that could be a possibility if anyone  gets desperate in the future.

 

Just a point of interest  on the steering  box, do all the readers of this forum realise that the worm gear in the steering box here in Australia wont work in the US in the same box,and vice versa as the worm is cut in the opposite direction for right hand drive. Its not just a matter of turning the worm around.

 

Regards

Kevin

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Fiddly stuff today, but it needs to get done.  Once I get my new firewall pad back I can run all the wiring, the choke cable, the throttle cable, the speedometer cable, oil pressure line and the temperature gauge line through the firewall and install and wire up the dash insert.  I had my temperature guage and the sending unit and the fuel sending unit and gauge restored by Bob's Speedometer, so they are back and ready to go.  All the wires and tubes run through a rubber grommet in the firewall.  This is from Phil Kennedy's car.

 

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My grommet was toast - hard as a rock and coming apart - although that slit is supposed to be there.

 

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I can't find any repo rubber for this part so I made my own.  I bought a 1/2 inch thick rubber pad off Ebay.

 

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After a disastrous attempt to cut the rubber to shape with an angle grinder and a cut-off wheel - that totally melted the rubber and left my garage smelling like a family of skunks had unloaded - I discovered the rubber cut very nicely with a utility knife lubricated with soapy water.  So I cut it to the correct shape and tried to figure out how to get it to the correct angles on the sides.  Sanding by hand would have taken a week, and my table-top disk sander gleefully melted the rubber again, even at slow speed.  I finally discovered my bench grinder with a rough stone wheel would take the rubber off fairly cleanly without turning it liquid.  It came out pretty well and was a perfect fit.  A little uneven around the edges, but that's hidden by the outer cover.

 

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Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)
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As you can see, it looks pretty good inside the cover.  All I need to do is drill the correct holes in the rubber.

 

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  I was a bit worried the drill might catch and tear the rubber, but my forstner bit made a very clean hole with no problems.

 

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Posted (edited)

EXCELLENT! I am gonna have to make one of those for my coupe.

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Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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I've got plenty of rubber left.  I can make you up one if you need it.  I'd just need to know hole sizes and spacing if there is enough left to tell.  I think the 32s had a few more wires and cables (free-wheeling), but the cover looks the same.

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, Taylormade said:

I've got plenty of rubber left.  I can make you up one if you need it.  I'd just need to know hole sizes and spacing if there is enough left to tell.  I think the 32s had a few more wires and cables (free-wheeling), but the cover looks the same.

Interesting....I have two holes with plates. One has about 4 1/4" center to center screw holes and the other has about 2 3/4" holes center to center screw holes. That larger one looks like yours with 4 cables/lines running through it. The other looks like it only has 2 cables/lines running through it. I hope I can find the smaller outer bezel....I know it's out in my shop....somewhere.

IMG_7609 (2).JPG

IMG_7610 (2).JPG

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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Both of mine are the larger size, maybe 4-1/4 or 4-3/8 inches center to center screw holes.  The Free-Wheeling cable in a big one and goes through the driver's side grommet along with the oil pressure gauge line, the water temperature gauge line and I think the large distributor wire that goes to the coil behind the dash panel..  I'm actually having an email discussion with Phil Kennedy, the PO, who owns a very original 32DL.  here is how his car is laid out - with my graphic comments.  Both distributor wires may go through there, I'm not sure at the moment.

 

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1564929577_Firewall-Passside.thumb.jpg.6e4bc465dd2b48128ad22a829f23d697.jpg

 

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The cover and overall shape of that wire grommet look the same as on my '33 Plymouth. Mine is located on the passenger side of the firewall while it looks like your earlier Dodge has it on the driver side.

 

I was thinking about making a mould and pouring a new one from something like urethane. But it looks like your method is simpler for. Thanks for posting!

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Yeah, I have two, one on each side.  Same size, different hole patterns.  It only took about half an hour to make two.  Still have to drill the holes, but that won’t take much time.  Thanks for looking!

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Not sure if it helps but when I cut some rubber bump stops for my car I found that they sanded a little better when cold - so stuck them in the freezer overnight.  Helped a little.

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I made my own firewall pad for my '36 Dodge using the painted cowlboard , homosote and a couple of layers of the felt jute. i used my old one as a pattern, then made several patterns until it fit correctly. With the 1/2 homosote and jute I was able to make it to the same thickness.The homosote mimicked  the pressed fiber backer and was very easy to cut. I was even able to incorporate the rubber flap at the bottom of mine to seal the floorboard. Your's doesn't look very much different than mine. Cost me about $60 for materials, really enough to do 2 parts.

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I’m curious where you found the jute and the cowlboard.  I have a sheet of Homosote left over from another project.

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I bought both the jute and cowl board from Restoration Specialties. of course, I had to paint the board the right color as they only stock a light gray and black since the suppliers imposed purchasing in standard packaging only! I used upholstery adhesive to glue everything together. I glued the cut out board to the homosote and then trimmed the homosote to fit the contour with a razor knife. I glued 2 layers of jute together to get the approx. thickness of the insulation then roughly trimmed it to shape. Final trimming was done after glueing it to the homosote. All holes were then carefully drilled or cut with  hole saws and the cable grommet openings were trimmed out with a sharp knife. Always a learning curve. I made one for another guy which came out even better! If you need any sheet rubber I use rubbersheetwarehouse.com. A lot of sizes  and types at reasonable prices.They carry strips, rolls, sheets and blocks. Here are a couple of shots

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Very cool.  I checked Restoration Specialties and their catalog says they have black painted board and the jute padding - they call it floor padding.  What did you use to cut the board, the edges look very clean?

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Posted (edited)

I just cut it with a utility knife with a new blade. The homosote cuts really nice too then can be clean up with a file or sandpaper. The jute is harder to cut. You really have to hold it down and you need a sharp blade to keep it from pulling. A good pair of sissors will also do the trick. Sharp hole saws make quick and clean work of the round holes.

Edited by jpage (see edit history)
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