Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

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If those wood pieces are like my 1931 pieces, they are covered with hardened drive line grease, oil and transmission fluid and probably not asphalt roofing stuff.

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You may be correct on that.  It’s a mess, whatever the gunk is!  I always assumed it was some sort of protective coating, but the more I think about it, the more I think you’re right.  I should have learned by now - never assume anything when you’re restoring a car.

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Maaaybe, but that stuff was so evenly coated on most of the underside that I always assumed (like you) that it was some sort of aftermarket undercoating.

 

Usually stuff from a leak shows a pattern originating from the source.

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You both may be correct.  Phil is correct, the stuff is evenly coated and rock hard.  But the concave metal plate screwed to the rear-most floorboard is loaded with grease, that also splattered over some of the floorboard.  This deposit appears to have been donated by a leaking differential, or, possibly, the rear ball joint.  So, keiser31 may be correct, also.  Either way, it’s a mess.

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Got the three rear most floorboards cut out and routed the edges.  The rear floorboard has the mounting holes drilled and the cutout for the differential plate.

 

IMG_0946.thumb.jpg.a92640d4bd1c20e1bd879614138e4f58.jpg

 

The attaching edges are routed for an overlapping fit.  I still haven't sanded the edges, cut out the battery access, or cleaned things up.

 

IMG_0945.thumb.jpg.be2c09899e07b23219781437dbccea5d.jpg

 

The routing was done on my Bosch router table.  I was worried about tear-out on the plywood, but I got very clean cuts on all the boards.

 

IMG_0948.thumb.jpg.6bb7c5001317072ed58c3caa232bed6f.jpg

 

Each floorboard has a mounting pad made of wood, and attached to each short end, that rests on the top of the frame rail.  The wood is 1-1/8" thick, three inches and a quarter inches wide, and the length of the floorboard.

Getting lumber of that dimension proved impossible.  Rather than having a sawmill plane it for me, I bought some oak from a big box store and glued two pieces together.

 

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This gives me a chunk of wood 1-1/4" thick and 3-1/2 wide.  I'll use my router to knock off an eight of an inch of the thickness and a quarter inch off the width, and then I can cut the resulting stock to the correct lengths.

I should have everything wrapped up by tomorrow evening.

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)
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The results are in, the Stat-O-Seal washers did the job on my leaking brake connections.  Once I installed them, the leaking stopped - period.  Not a drop of fluid anywhere.  They are a combination crush washer and rubber seal.  Don't get the steel variety, get the aluminum, as they act as a crush washer and rubber seal.  I got mine from Speedway Motors.  I needed two sizes, one for the outer part of the banjo bolt and the other for the threaded section.

 

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I also got most of the floor spacers done for the floorboards.  They rest on the frame and keep the actual floorboards at the correct level.

 

Here you can see the old and the new.  The holes in the old piece are there to clear rivets and bolts on the frame.  I haven't drilled them yet on the new spacers.

 

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Sitting in place on the bottom of the floorboards.

 

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The old floorboards before I removed them from the car.

 

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And the new ones partially finished.

 

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Excellent work....and saw the video of the engine start.....well done.

Been off the forum for a while and just started back on the car now everything has settled down. Should be posting again soon.

 

Cheers

Ian

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Starting and running the engine a few times and some minor problems have cropped up.  The oil pressure is running 65 pounds, which I think is too high.  Looks like I may have to adjust the pressure relief valve.  I found a small oil leak at the bottom of the timing chain cover.  I tightened the cover bolts and it seems to have stopped the leak.  I certainly hope so, as the thought of having to replace the cover gasket is not something I want to consider.  I also found a leak around the pressure relief valve cover - which is more of a screw on  domed fitting in the side of the block.  This will need some investigating.  I’m not sure if there is a gasket involved or just the tightness of the unit being screwed tight into the block is supposed to be sufficient.  If I have to adjust the pressure relief valve, I guess I’ll find out as that cover is how you access it.

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There may have been a very thin gasket around the domed base.

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Had to make a gasket for mine ,doing same oozing . Counter clockwise nut to lower your pressure , after removing cotter pin .

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Is there a gap between the cover and the block?  I don’t think mine is screwed all the way in.  Any pictures would help.

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1 hour ago, Taylormade said:

Is there a gap between the cover and the block?  I don’t think mine is screwed all the way in.  Any pictures would help.

Here is the cover on my 1931....I suppose a wire brush would have helped a bit....

Picture 27589.jpg

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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I think there should be a gap (about 1/16") showing between dome hex nut and block surface, at least there is on my CD8 block. Mine has a copper washer (about 1/16" thick) sitting in the slight recess in the block, and the round mating surface of the dome nut fits tight against it. The copper washer is only about 1/8" wide, don't know if any are available, probably could make one out of any suitable material. My car's operation manual says oil pressure relief valve should never need adjusting, and has lots of cautionary advice. Gauge may be giving a misread. Before adjusting pressure, try another gauge or pressure device, a relatively easy test. Just hook a temporary gauge to outlet coming from block.

Edited by Gunsmoke (see edit history)

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My engine rebuilder said it might need adjusting.  Not sure why he thought so - I’m giving him a call Monday.  I used a new temporary gauge, not the original, to test the oil pressure.  I’ll try the original gauge and see what that reads.  At least I have too much pressure rather than not enough.

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Not sure what the spec is for these engines but 65lbs doesn’t sound like a big issue if it’s cold.  Takes quite a while to get the oil up to temperature and it’s likely to be quite different then.

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17 hours ago, Gunsmoke said:

I think there should be a gap (about 1/16") showing between dome hex nut and block surface, at least there is on my CD8 block. Mine has a copper washer (about 1/16" thick) sitting in the slight recess in the block, and the round mating surface of the dome nut fits tight against it. The copper washer is only about 1/8" wide, don't know if any are available, probably could make one out of any suitable material. My car's operation manual says oil pressure relief valve should never need adjusting, and has lots of cautionary advice. Gauge may be giving a misread. Before adjusting pressure, try another gauge or pressure device, a relatively easy test. Just hook a temporary gauge to outlet coming from block.

I see about 1/16" gap on my '31.

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53 minutes ago, Mattml430 said:

My 29 runs  up around 70-75 cold and around 50 once warmed up. 

 

Wow, that is high. Way too high in my uninformed opinion. What oil are you running?

 

Thick (higher viscosity) oil leads to high pressure and low flow. I hope you are not taking Penrite's advice and running their 20W-70. That is far to thick for a "new" engine. Use what it was designed for, probably SAE 30 so use a 0 or 5W-30 (once run in).

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)

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On 11/4/2018 at 7:01 AM, Taylormade said:

The oil pressure is running 65 pounds,

I agree it is too high. What oil are you running?

 

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On 11/5/2018 at 6:09 AM, Spinneyhill said:

Wow, that is high. Way too high in my uninformed opinion. What oil are you running?

 

Thick (higher viscosity) oil leads to high pressure and low flow. I hope you are not taking Penrite's advice and running their 20W-70. That is far to thick for a "new" engine. Use what it was designed for, probably SAE 30 so use a 0 or 5W-30 (once run in).

I’m using a 25W 50 mineral oil. 

I’ll take your advice and use a lighter oil. I’ll put some 5W 30 in it and give some feedback on the oil pressure. 

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Hanging in there and trying to lose some weight before I have knee replacement surgery.  I actually got my newly reupholstered front seat back a few weeks ago and I’ll post some pictures after the holidays.  I’ve also completed all the wood floorboards and am waiting for a warm day to paint them.  I’m also working inside, wiring my headlights and cowl lights.  It’s very difficult to get around at the moment with bone on bone arthritis in my right knee, but I am making progress - mostly from a seated position.

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Trying to loose weight over Christmas. Now there is a challenge! hope you have better luck (willpower?) than me.

Good luck and Seasons Greetings anyway.

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Ouch! That is a serious challenge at this time of year. Keep your eye on the ball!

 

It is very good to hear you are keeping busy through the pain. It must have been exciting to receive the new seat. All the best.

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