Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

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Have you a plan on how to make the reinstatement of the instrument cluster cable fittings easier than they were was to get out? I would have thought perhaps you could make an alteration to the design to make the job less of an ordeal.

Ray.

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Who is doing the electrical work on starter and Gen, do they have experience with these particular units, (?) I am assuming they are both original Delco units (?) Do these 32 units have any of the pot metal we see in the earlier units like end plates ect, I am thinking by this time they got away from this but would like confirmation.

Any details on the work being done would be helpful, prices would also be nice.

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The wiring on my '41 Buick was in a similar condition, a fire just waiting to happen. The scariest thing was that the PO. actually drove it in that condition.

Great looking work on your car, and love the story. Keep it coming!

Keith

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I have a few questions about my water pump for all the experts out there. it seems like a very simple unit. I'd like to rebuild it, if possible.

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I have some pretty severe movement in the shaft fore and aft. You can see the extent of the movement in these side-by-side shots.

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Since the fan mount and the belt pully are both pinned to the shaft and can't move along the shaft, the only thing that would cause this movement is the impeller being too far toward the rear of the shaft. Or am I mistaken about this? I looks like it's on about right and pushing it further onto the shaft would leave the shaft sticking out from the impeller.

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So, what's the fix? How tough is the impeller? I don't want to damage it trying something I shouldn't.

Also, is this hole for lubrication, or does some sort of grease or oiling fitting go there?

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And finally, it's still pretty greasy, but I wasn't able to move this nut, which I assume is the packing nut. It's tough to get a wrench in there. Am I doing something wrong?

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Thanks for any help.

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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Have you a plan on how to make the reinstatement of the instrument cluster cable fittings easier than they were was to get out? I would have thought perhaps you could make an alteration to the design to make the job less of an ordeal.

Ray.

If I clean up the threads I can pretty well finger tighten them to where they'll just need a half turn or so more to finish the job. I always hate to modify things - it seems to come back and haunt me in ways I never saw coming.

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The only answer I can give to any of those questions is that you need a special wrench for the packing nut. I don't happen to have a photo of one at the moment. You may be able to alter a tool that you already have in order to do the job.

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Who is doing the electrical work on starter and Gen, do they have experience with these particular units, (?) I am assuming they are both original Delco units (?) Do these 32 units have any of the pot metal we see in the earlier units like end plates ect, I am thinking by this time they got away from this but would like confirmation.

Any details on the work being done would be helpful, prices would also be nice.

I'm going with:

AER

16574 S. Baver Road

Grand Ledge, MI 48837

I talked to owner Jason Smith, who does all the work himself. He completely rebuilds the electrics, powdercoats the unit in the correct semi-gloss black finish, replates anything that was originally plated, and installs new Delco labels - the metal ovals, not sure of the correct terminology - with correct stamped numbers. He charges $350 per unit.

He told me that about the only thing remaining from the original unit are the exterior metal pieces. He specializes in rare and antique units. I'm not sure if the end pieces are pot metal or not. They were just too greasy for me to bother with when I got home. Jason said my parts are very common for the period.

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The only answer I can give to any of those questions is that you need a special wrench for the packing nut. I don't happen to have a photo of one at the moment. You may be able to alter a tool that you already have in order to do the job.

I'm assuming it is a wrench that has very thin sides to be able to slip into the narrow opening and still turn. I may have to grind something down to fit.

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I am not familiar with the 32 pump ( but your pump looks nearly identical to my own ) but the earlier pumps have a flange on the backside of the impeller that once assembled properly dictates end to end movement, yours is prob. worn, maybe not so bad that simply taking up the slack by moving the fan side inward may correct the problem, chances are the shaft is worn from overtightening and overuse of packing material so it will have to be replaced.

There is a special water pump wrench that is used to loosen the nut, I do not believe they were reverse thread on your pump.

The earlier pumps had an oiler, it was a fitting that had a small ball that when pressed would allow the proper oil to seep down past the ball and go where it needed to go, I think by 32 they would have had a zerk fitting of some sort, should be in the instruction manual how to maintain the pump, maybe look and see if there are threads down inside of the opening for a fitting to screw into.

Attached picture is the special water pump wrench used on 29/30 Dodge maybe others. The two little notches on this wrench at the head were done long ago by someone just to give a bit more clearance. Not original to the wrench but often seen.

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Edited by 1930 (see edit history)

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I'm going with:

AER

16574 S. Baver Road

Grand Ledge, MI 48837

I talked to owner Jason Smith, who does all the work himself. He completely rebuilds the electrics, powdercoats the unit in the correct semi-gloss black finish, replates anything that was originally plated, and installs new Delco labels - the metal ovals, not sure of the correct terminology - with correct stamped numbers. He charges $350 per unit.

He told me that about the only thing remaining from the original unit are the exterior metal pieces. He specializes in rare and antique units. I'm not sure if the end pieces are pot metal or not. They were just too greasy for me to bother with when I got home. Jason said my parts are very common for the period.

Is he able to re-wind, I am thinking not but would like confirmation either way.

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IMG_1975_zpscafc7dc0.jpg

There are 3 places to lubricate this pump. The two holes in the main casting each take a drop or two of plain motor oil from time to time. I do it every couple of months, or so. I actually also add a drop of oil where the shaft disappears into the casting in several places. That's more oiling than they ask for, but I figure it can't hurt.

Then there's that fitting towards the back of the casting. That takes grease...water pump grease is best and still obtainable from several sources. Me? I've still got 3/4 of a can of water pump grease I bought at a Western Auto back in the 70s!

Don't squirt in too much grease or it may end up in the cooling system.

Edited by Phil 32DL6 (see edit history)

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There are 3 places to lubricate this pump. The two holes in the main casting each take a drop or two of plain motor oil from time to time. I do it every couple of months, or so. I actually also add a drop of oil where the shaft disappears into the casting in several places. That's more oiling than they ask for, but I figure it can't hurt.

Then there's that fitting towards the back of the casting. That takes grease...water pump grease is best and still obtainable from several sources. Me? I've still got 3/4 of a can of water pump grease I bought at a Western Auto back in the 70s!

Don't squirt in too much grease or it may end up in the cooling system.

Phil, dont you think there would have been some sort of fitting here originally, if not than anything and everything would have the ability to get inside of there and screw up the impeller shaft quickly including sand. Does the instruction book show a fitting ?

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Thanks for the sidemount details. Now I know what I should be looking for when I dig through all these parts that have been collected over the years. There should also some other parts for attaching the wheel to the support.

As for your upholstery, I vote the thinner, more original material.

For the instruments, I have noticed that the instrument faces are currently a "gold", however, this gold was probably some other color originally before fading/yellowing to this current tint. The reason I mention this is that I've noticed the same/similar color on my 1938 Chrysler, and also on my 1965 Valiant (Dart instruments - it's a Canadian car). On the 1938 Chrysler, one gauge was replaced, and is showing a lighter color that is more silver than the other gauges which show gold, on the Valiant, one replace gauge shows silver vs the other's light gold, which leaves me to believe that perhaps all these gauges might have been some silvery or other lighter color vs the gold tint they currently are. The Valiant gauges look to be brushed aluminum that was clear coated, and the coating may have yellowed, but I haven't tried stripping any of my gauges to see. The 1938 Chrysler factory brochure (although hand illustrated) shows silver gauge faces.

Anyhow, I just thought I would point this out to say that restoring the gauges faces is probably a bit more work than just matching the existing paint color.

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Phil, dont you think there would have been some sort of fitting here originally, if not than anything and everything would have the ability to get inside of there and screw up the impeller shaft quickly including sand. Does the instruction book show a fitting ?

Just a fitting at the rear. The front two oil holes are open. (See attached diagram from manual.) BTW, '31s have only one oil hole.

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Thanks for the sidemount details. Now I know what I should be looking for when I dig through all these parts that have been collected over the years. There should also some other parts for attaching the wheel to the support.

As for your upholstery, I vote the thinner, more original material.

For the instruments, I have noticed that the instrument faces are currently a "gold", however, this gold was probably some other color originally before fading/yellowing to this current tint. The reason I mention this is that I've noticed the same/similar color on my 1938 Chrysler, and also on my 1965 Valiant (Dart instruments - it's a Canadian car). On the 1938 Chrysler, one gauge was replaced, and is showing a lighter color that is more silver than the other gauges which show gold, on the Valiant, one replace gauge shows silver vs the other's light gold, which leaves me to believe that perhaps all these gauges might have been some silvery or other lighter color vs the gold tint they currently are. The Valiant gauges look to be brushed aluminum that was clear coated, and the coating may have yellowed, but I haven't tried stripping any of my gauges to see. The 1938 Chrysler factory brochure (although hand illustrated) shows silver gauge faces.

Anyhow, I just thought I would point this out to say that restoring the gauges faces is probably a bit more work than just matching the existing paint color.

As far as the instruments go, all I have ever seen in a 1932 DB are gold faced instruments behind a light face plate. I am certain the gold is original.

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I also have only seen the gold and believe that to be original.

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That's not to say that the gold has yellowed and become more gold over the years, but both Phil and my car have the same shade of gold instruments. But then, we both have the same shade of "tan" upholstery - that used to be brown.

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We all know how accurate those old sales brochures are...NOT!

But in light of this discussion on whether the silver dash really had gold gauge faces originally or not, I thought this was especially ironic. :rolleyes:

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We all know how accurate those old sales brochures are...NOT!

But in light of this discussion on whether the silver dash really had gold gauge faces originally or not, I thought this was especially ironic. :rolleyes:

The artist who did the rendering may have misheard the colors to be applied. Very common to see non-production items and colors on the sales literature.

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<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>And notice the entire dash is wood-grained in the brochure illustration instead of the correct wood-grained top and black bottom.

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I'm going to send my water pump to:

Flying Dutchman Pump Rebuilders

200 Davis Creek Road Selma, OR 97538

They quoted me $95 for a total rebuild with a 24 month warrenty. They also use a modern seal rather than the style old packing, although you can't tell from looking at the pump.

I'll show you how it comes out when I get it back - supposedly a week or less turn-around.

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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The '32 water pumps came with either a zirc fitting (later production) or a grease cap (earlier production)...you know, the type you unscrew a cap, fill it up with water pump grease, put it back on and screw it down 1/4-1/2 turn every 300 or so miles. You might ask the rebuilder if you have a choice and let him know. Me? I like the caps, although many were swapped out by mechanics along the way.

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IMG_1975_zpscafc7dc0.jpg

I'm going to send my water pump to:

Flying Dutchman Pump Rebuilders

200 Davis Creek Road Selma, OR 97538

They quoted me $95 for a total rebuild with a 24 month warrenty. They also use a modern seal rather than the style old packing, although you can't tell from looking at the pump.

I'll show you how it comes out when I get it back - supposedly a week or less turn-around.

Thats cheap, I hope they know what they are getting into. modern seal is the way too go in my opinion

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