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The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL


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2 hours ago, Taylormade said:

Keiser, do you have a close shot of your horn mount?  Preferably on the car - assuming it's still on either of your cars.

I will get a photo of it for you tomorrow. Neither one is attached to a car right now, but I will show you what it looks like.

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Dick...This is probably as good an answer as any.

This is a close up I took of that very original blue sedan up in Vermont that was for sale recently. It's an early production car like yours. The horn is mounted towards the front and the mount looks pretty original to me.

(Yes, it was missing the loom for the ignition wires.)

32 DL Horn Bracket.jpg

Edited by Phil 32DL6
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Interesting fan on that first picture in post 1276. It looks to have the blades in pairs rather than at about 90° apart.

 

Another question: is the loom different in cars with the horn forward? I note in one picture with rear mounted horn the wires are only an inch or two long out of the firewall grommet. What does your loom fit?

 

Update: the parts book only shows one number for DL horn wire, plus another for special equipment (twin trumpets).

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)
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Dick...

 

Here's another one. This is from the green '32 RS Coupe near me that was for sale.

Again, this is a very original, early production car, the bracket is mounted forward, and, not only looks original, but looks to be the same as the other one I posted.

Note that the horn is slightly different (shorter housing in back).

32 DL Horn-2.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Been a while since I last posted.  Cold weather is making it tough to get much done out in the garage.  Today it's sunny and 68 degrees, so I sanded down my four hood pieces, the running board shields, two vent doors and the rear frame/gas tank cover.  They're off to the painters on Monday.

 

l'm having a problem with some leakage from my brake fittings.  I think the copper washers are too hard and haven't crushed properly when I tightened things down.  I did put double flares on all the brake lines and I think that was the correct way to go when replacing the lines, although the originals were single flare.  I'm not getting any indication of leaks from the fittings on the lines, just around the copper washers.  I know the synthetic brake fluid tends to find its way out more often than conventional stuff, but had I used that, there would be no paint left on my backing plates and rear axle.

 

Once these last parts have a coat of paint, I should be ready for Spring assembly.  I have all the chrome done, all paint will be finished by the end of the month, the upholstery will be done March first, and I have the frame and all mechanical work finished at this point.  Three and a half years.  I thought I'd be done at least a year ago, but it's been a fun ride and I've really learned a lot - on my own and from the many helpful folks on this forum.

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20 minutes ago, Taylormade said:

Been a while since I last posted.  Cold weather is making it tough to get much done out in the garage.  Today it's sunny and 68 degrees, so I sanded down my four hood pieces, the running board shields, two vent doors and the rear frame/gas tank cover.  They're off to the painters on Monday.

 

l'm having a problem with some leakage from my brake fittings.  I think the copper washers are too hard and haven't crushed properly when I tightened things down.  I did put double flares on all the brake lines and I think that was the correct way to go when replacing the lines, although the originals were single flare.  I'm not getting any indication of leaks from the fittings on the lines, just around the copper washers.  I know the synthetic brake fluid tends to find its way out more often than conventional stuff, but had I used that, there would be no paint left on my backing plates and rear axle.

 

Once these last parts have a coat of paint, I should be ready for Spring assembly.  I have all the chrome done, all paint will be finished by the end of the month, the upholstery will be done March first, and I have the frame and all mechanical work finished at this point.  Three and a half years.  I thought I'd be done at least a year ago, but it's been a fun ride and I've really learned a lot - on my own and from the many helpful folks on this forum.

Hello Taylormade,

I've discovered your post with great interest. I live in Belgium and I feld in love with a DeSoto SA 1931. You've done a fantastic job with your car and your posts are so interesting. It help me so much for restoring my car.

I send you a picture of it. 

Thank's a lot and good continuation...

 

Gabriel

IMG_20160424_185909.jpg

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Perhaps you could anneal the copper washers? It is easy enough. Heat to cherry red, then either quench in water or let air cool (depending on which web site you look at!).

 

I struck this problem on my DC-8 recently. I had the hose end of the banjo contacting the head of a wheel cylinder mounting bolt so it didn't mount flat against the copper washer. It looked OK (couldn't see a gap) but it wasn't.

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)
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9 hours ago, Gabriel S said:

Hello Taylormade,

I've discovered your post with great interest. I live in Belgium and I feld in love with a DeSoto SA 1931. You've done a fantastic job with your car and your posts are so interesting. It help me so much for restoring my car.

I send you a picture of it. 

Thank's a lot and good continuation...

 

Gabriel

IMG_20160424_185909.jpg

 

'Love your roadster!  Many similarities between our cars.  Have fun with the restoration.

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1 hour ago, Spinneyhill said:

Perhaps you could anneal the copper washers? It is easy enough. Heat to cherry red, then either quench in water or let air cool (depending on which web site you look at!).

 

I struck this problem on my DC-8 recently. I had the hose end of the banjo contacting the head of a wheel cylinder mounting bolt so it didn't mount flat against the copper washer. It looked OK (couldn't see a gap) but it wasn't.

 

Annealing was going to be my next step.  I tightened the banjos today and we'll see if that works.  I found out only one was actually leaking at this point, and that one turned the most, so I may be okay.

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  • 4 weeks later...

With the weather warming up I'm finally getting around to the initial valve adjustment I was going to do last month.  With the plug in the head removed (using a rod set on top of number six cylinder) and the timing mark on the flywheel, I have no problem finding top dead center and I can tell by the position of the valves that I'm on number one cylinder firing.  Since this is the first start up, I won't be setting the clearances hot.  My good friend Phil Kennedy found that his DL liked .014 exhaust and .012 intake settings.  He says there is a bit of valve noise, but he gets the best performance with these settings.  He drove from Connecticut to Michigan with no problems, so I'm going with his initial settings.  I have a crank, so it's easy for me to turn the crankshaft by hand, but the new rebuild is still stiff enough that turning the engine backwards is more of a chore (the crank doesn't work going backwards), so rocking it back and forth to accurately see when the valve stems are free is a problem, even with the plugs out.  So I was worried that I wouldn't be able to get the clearances set accurately due to not having the tappets totally clear of the cam lobes.  Doing some research on the web, I discovered this tech tip from the excellent P 15-D 24 site.  They say you can set the clearances with just two turns of the crank.  I know there are some differences in the later Chrysler Company flathead sixes, but the early engines are very similar and I'm hoping this approach may work.  This is directly from their tech page...

 

Turn the engine  over to Top Dead Center (TDC). Verify piston #1 is in firing position by checking the position of the distributor rotor. If should point around 7 o’clock. If it points to the 1 o’clock position, you have piston #6 in firing position. Manually turn the engine one full revolution and you are ready to start. Remove the valve covers and use the following sequence for the order of the valves to adjust.

Stage A, #1 and #6 at TDC, #1 in firing position
Stage B, #1 and #6 at TDC, #6 in firing position
To move from Stage A to B, manually turn the engine 1 revolution.

Stage A – Adjust #1 Both valves, #2 Inlet valve, #3 Exhaust Valve, #4 Inlet valve, #5 Both valves.
Stage B – Adjust #2 Both valves, #3 Inlet valve, #4 Exhaust valve, #5 Inlet valve, #6 Both valves.

 

Has anyone set clearances with this method?  It seems too simple to be true, not having to turn the crank trying to find when both tappets are clear.  On my engine, you have to use three wrenches - one to hold the tappet from turning, one to loosen the adjusting nut and one to adjust the clearance, plus using the feel gauge at the same time.  My seventy-year-old hands lack the dexterity to handle this, so my lovely bride of 48 plus years has offered to manipulate the two bottom wrenches while I do the actual adjustment.  We'll see if our previously successful marriage survives.

 

Any comments on the above would be most appreciated.

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Not familiar with this particular motor, however this method in not uncommon.

I would go with these adjustments, It should be easy to tell if the lifter is on the cam is in the right place.

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What a simple system! Has to be good because of that. It will be a great deal easier with no fenders, manifolds etc. getting in the way. Taking the wheel off too might make access easier to get two of you in there.

 

Its great to see you back on the job!

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Sounds simple (and you'll soon know if it's too simple to be true! ;))

 

Reading through the procedure I noted that there's some duplication (ie. Stage A, #2 inlet, Stage B, both valves) but I guess you can use that as a double check.

 

Using 4 hands? Now that's cheating!!

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keiser31 asked for some shots of my u-joints to help a friend of his.  Looks like the 31 and 31 DBs used the same unit.  I discovered my front unit was in bad shape when I took it apart to check things out.  Luckily, the rear joint and the spare I got with the transmission Larry Yirga gave me in return for helping him rebuild his transmission were both in good shape.  Here is what they look like on the car.  The rear u-joint is actually part of the driveshaft, so if you need a new one, you're going to have to find a driveshaft with a good unit.  The front is standard operating procedure.  Lucky it was my front one that went bad.

 

Rear...

IMG_7329a.thumb.jpg.8afd38963c6956642fd595d549b5ffaf.jpg

 

And front...

IMG_7330a.thumb.jpg.61c044842f896c11a7cf93ba3815e3ca.jpg

 

When I took mine apart, I discovered the  bearing had been turning in the housing and had worn the housing so badly there was no saving it.  The spare turned out to be in excellent shape.  Here's what it looks like inside after removing the outer spring and two bolts, and sliding off the ball shaped cover.

 

IMG_6775.thumb.jpg.788ea917fbe003bd508ea6e7f298c8fc.jpg

 

This is the area where the bad unit was worn out by the bearing turning in the housing.

 

IMG_6776.thumb.jpg.d026d3846e8baf5c439648a7edae3d19.jpg

 

I discovered the cork gasket in the cover was toast.

 

IMG_6777.thumb.jpg.eef9ae86d0347923011365de9f84b634.jpg

 

I bought some cork sheets, cut strips to the proper size and put them in the groove in the cover.  Worked like a charm.

IMG_6794.thumb.jpg.778486f8ba11ef867bfddfdb556289e6.jpg

 

  As you can see. there is not too much to these units.  Whether you could find replacement bearings is a question I can't answer.  I'm also sure the bearings must be exactly centered in the mount or they would wobble all over the place.  I hope this helps.

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I got back to my door latch mechanisms today.  It seems mine had all developed cracks in the housing due to a very bad factory design.  Between welding up the cracks and using the units graciously sent to me by board member Ply33, it looks lie I'll be opening all four doors in the near future.  Everything cleaned up nicely.  I'm going to have to turn some stepped rivets on my lathe to complete the assembly on some, but that shouldn't be much of a problem.  One of the assemblies had already been jury-rigged.  Now I know why that rear door never opened right.  In fact, Phil and I couldn't get it opened the day I visited Daphne the first time in forty years.

 

A finished assembly.IMG_7774.thumb.jpg.7fad4d33d3a2ae2426c8b49ad05bc911.jpg

 

Lots of fiddly parts in these things.

 

IMG_7781.thumb.jpg.5913f51102bee394160469558816261a.jpg

 

One of my units on the right and Ply33's on the left.  They thickened the gauge of the steel between 32 and 33 but those sharp bends and thin areas of metal couldn't handle the stress over the years..

 

IMG_7776.thumb.jpg.3b09f2d55253ec92c6025409d10d084d.jpg

 

Any suggestions on the best lubricant for these things?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Spring has finally sprung around here and it looks like it's going to be assembly time this March.  I still have to start up the motor, but I have the coil and a new battery.  Just a valve adjustment and static timing and I'll be ready to turn her over for the first time.

 

The car is finally completely painted.  It's not going to win any awards at Pebble Beach, but as a fun driver I think it will do just fine.  All single stage black, mostly shiny, a few dust nibs and the occasional defect in the metal (some from the factory) , but I want to drive the car before I take the big dirt nap, so it's as good as it's going to get.

The hood panels hardening in the sun.  They suggest you wait 30 days before you really handle them (as in assembly), so March it is.

 

IMG_7792.thumb.jpg.7c00a2b90b5e80d2998cc5ef27a92bfa.jpg

 

IMG_7793.thumb.jpg.ea83eec53698e985f35dcf65b27ca7ef.jpg

 

These are the splash panels above the running boards.  You can also see the hood vents hiding underneath.

 

IMG_7796.thumb.jpg.cf0634e06f74094f0a110e97268b5d2a.jpg

 

IMG_7797.thumb.jpg.07f636d85c9b5db851f39cb0b4526f62.jpg

 

The hood side panels.  Tough to photograph black paint inside with just overhead lighting.  The cloth padding makes them look kind of wrinkled, but they are actually very straight.

 

IMG_7798.thumb.jpg.16bc37d85ec281ff9c1d1dfc9c3a10af.jpg

 

IMG_7799.thumb.jpg.f58f96791088ef4663051cc52c82e652.jpg

 

The rear gas tank trim cover.

 

IMG_7801.thumb.jpg.f1314051be86c202197d15968a6ff78c.jpg

 

Front fenders - very dusty at the moment.

 

IMG_7803.thumb.jpg.9f0a726a824ba9d2b68a225c05867dd3.jpg

 

IMG_7804.thumb.jpg.d0bacbd0104211ee5f5b7d1ec80cb1eb.jpg

 

Rear fenders - equally dusty.

 

IMG_7809.thumb.jpg.f899e265bbfe342c3c8ed584dfe7903c.jpg

 

Just got my exterior door handles back from Paul's Chrome.  These two piece handles can cause problems due to different metals, but they came out looking great.

 

IMG_7811.thumb.jpg.e05be69c88fdb5c2453684d3d03c97cb.jpg

 

IMG_7814.thumb.jpg.b4bb20f23a14294c3136da985518f3fd.jpg

 

Flattening out the running board rubber and waiting for a little warmer weather to glue it on.

 

IMG_7816.thumb.jpg.cf612ffc6e785b5cd03eb3792ad17eb5.jpg

 

The rest of the chrome pieces ready to go.

 

IMG_7817.thumb.jpg.bfed039a87b281913cd9248de2cffef2.jpg

 

IMG_7818.thumb.jpg.d576e1dc3000ed95d582f47e5202d15a.jpg

 

The bare bones, ready for the topsides to go on.

 

IMG_7819.thumb.jpg.c667076df49cd07ab96e6275ee4bfceb.jpg

 

Lots of work to do this Spring, but it will be a lot more fun than disassembly and cleaning!

 

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The body on this car doesn't sit on the frame, it's actually channeled over it and attached to the side of the frame.  The only webbing used is on the very back part of the body where it meets the gas tank cover.  There are rubber pads for the frame to body mounting areas.

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