Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

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And it only took you 65 pages and 1618 posts....?

 

MUST BE AN AWESOME FEELING!!!

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Congrats. Seems to have been a long time coming.

We want to see those tail lights going down the road.

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Good going! Reminds me of the feeling when I got her going again after 15 years of sitting idle!

 

Can't wait to get a ride in her once again!

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Congratulations!  What a thrill that was.  So special to have your granddaughter there.

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Good Job !!!!!!!  We hope you are still wanting to drive Daphne when the time comes.

I have been prepping our DeSoto for the Glidden Tour in Twin Falls, Idaho.

 

Bob and Sally

 

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Another annoying problem has reared its ugly head.  I noticed a slight engine oil leak this morning.  I filled the car with oil several months ago and have been monitoring for any leaking ever since.  Of course this was before I started the engine for the first time.  After the motor ran with full oil pressure, I discovered this tiny leak - in the worst possible place on my car.  The Floating Power feature on my DL has the front of the motor mounted on a single rubber mount placed on the top of a stamped steel cradle that straddles the frame.  You can see it in the picture below.  The rubber pad is just under the waterpump, with the cradle straddling the frame.  The cradle has a hole in the center so you can take it off over the front pulley, but this can only be done with the motor out of the car or the pulley off.

 

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The front of the engine has a plate and the timing cover attached, held on by some common bolts and some exclusive to the plate.  Here you can see both the plate and the cover during engine disassembly.

 

1645271678_leak1.thumb.jpg.d25fbf52ce218dd58a4709a893f08ac3.jpg

 

This is what it looks like with everything in place and not covered by the cradle.

 

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Obviously, once I got the motor started and running, oil was forced under pressure into the timing cover for the first time.  That's when the leak became apparent.

The very tiny leak is coming from right here on the bottom of the motor.  it's coming from the area between the plate and the motor, not from between the timing cover and the plate.

 

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With the motor in the car and the mounting cradle blocking access, it's very hard, almost impossible, to get up under there and tighten anything.

I did manage to get a wrench on the two lower bolts that hold the cover and plate in place.  I could tighten them slightly, but there still seemed to be seepage after I cleaned everything off.

Needless to say, if this doesn't solve the problem, I'm in trouble.  The only way to fix this seems to be a long a tedious road.  I'd have to remove the radiator and all hoses, support the front of the engine on a hoist, pull the front pulley, remove the cradle,

remove the cover and plate, get new gaskets, clean everything and put it all back together.  I'm strongly considering just leaving it alone and resigning myself to cleaning off the engine pan after each trip.

The leak is so small, if I can get it clean enough, maybe just a tiny bit of silicon rubber (ugh!) in the crack would fix things.

 

Daphne is fighting me at every turn, no doubt as revenge for leaving her all those years ago.  Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned.

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Before the last post I tightened the bolts that hold the plate and timing cover in place - the ones  I could get to.  Checking two hours later, it seems to have helped.  Not sure if the leak is completely stopped, but it's definitely slowed.  A check after 24 hours should confirm if the problem is solved.

 

I'm currently working on the firewall insulation pad found on the inside of the firewall in the passenger compartment.  It's in pretty bad shape, and has come apart, the front "decorative" piece coming unglued from the pad.  I was surprised to find not just the expected jute padding, but a molded piece between the jute and the cover.  I suspect this molded piece is loaded with asbestos, as this was the material of choice for heat and fire protection back in the day.  It will be carefully disposed of. 

 

Here is a shot of the pad and cover, both facing into the interior.  You can see the molded section on top of the jute.

 

2126223760_firewallpad1.thumb.jpg.35b6fb51ad95836f64ef3b19d71d2415.jpg

 

Here's a close shot of the jute and the molded piece.

 

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I was thinking of buying this to replace the pad.

 

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My only concern is that without the molded piece for support, would this pad tend to sag or distort over time?

 

The two removable front floorboards also have what I suspect is a similar material attached to the board, facing the

motor.  Again, this must be for heat protection - and probably contains asbestos.

 

IMG_0850.thumb.jpg.c90fb9182a24269ab4df0ace224555e2.jpg

 

It's disintegrating, and the fibers can get into the air.

 

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I found this material that seems to be about the same consistency and is the right thickness, but I worry about its ability to handle heat from the motor.

 

1923577750_firewallbuy2.thumb.JPG.28651da79b896736442b89bc3f041267.JPG

 

I don't want to use something that might be flammable, and this may be.

 

Then there is this stuff that has the right properties and thickness if i use two layers, but it will hardly look original with the reflective, shiny outer surface.

 

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Always something to try and figure out.  Someone, somewhere must have solved this problem at some point.

 

Maybe just paint the surface with hi-heat flat black and go with that.

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dcmclassics.com sell ABS firewall pads. They list '33-35 Dodge, but not '32. quietride.com also list a 33 DO but no '32. Hmmm, looks like '32 is the forgotten year.

 

You could ask the vendor of the universal pad if it will sag? You have a good number of screws with large washers to hold it to the firewall too.

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)
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13 minutes ago, Spinneyhill said:

dcmclassics.com sell ABS firewall pads. They list '33-35 Dodge, but not '32. quietride.com also list a 33 DO but no '32. Hmmm, looks like '32 is the forgotten year.

 

You could ask the vendor of the universal pad if it will sag? You have a good number of screws with large washers to hold it to the firewall too.

Yes....1931 and 1932 are quite the scarce ones for finding anything new.

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I doubt that anything you see aftermarket will have the thick insulation like the original pad. I've  been thinking about glueing up several layers of the new "jute" material, which is really nothing more than a felt carpet pad, or glueing several pieces of homosote together as an insulator. The homosote should be available from any good lumber company. Then the outer panel board can be glued to the insulation. The insulation on my '36 is about 1 in. or 11/4 in. thick. Homosote also has a similar consistency as the original insulation. I would imagine that your firewall pad is held on by those split bubbleheaded push pins.

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I found Homosote at a Menards.  I live in a small town in the middle of nowhere, so it’s a 70 mile round trip, but they had some with a good fire retardant rating and it was the right thickness - 1/2 inch.  The pattern on the outer covering  matches that of the firewall pad, really lucky.  Thanks, jpage for the heads up, Homosote was the answer to my problem.  I’ll post some pix tomorrow.

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My guess is that originally Homosote was treated with creosote, which is carcegenic. Hopefully, they have better products to impregnate it with now.

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Twenty  years from now they’ll probably discover that all the current safe and environmentaly friendly products contain a deadly material that has been poisoning us for decades.

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If Homosote is indeed impregnated with Creosote, it will have a distinct odor that will likely concentrate in the confines of a closed car.  Might want to get a good whiff of it before purchasing. 

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Here are some shots of the Homosote cut and in place on the two floorboards.  It proved to be easy to cut with a jigsaw.  I cleaned up the edges with sandpaper.  These panels were originally black, so I'm going to give them a quick coat of H-Temp flat black.

 

IMG_0911.thumb.jpg.50fe5f3d025d016992f43c00322a2a26.jpg

 

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IMG_0916.thumb.jpg.3238c78e8ce6dddf592415d400d10b6f.jpg

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While crawling around under my car checking on the leak from the bottom of the timing cover (tightening the bolts seems to have almost stopped the problem, nothing is dripping or flowing, but I still can see a tiny bit of oil seeping) I discovered another problem.  My brake lines are still leaking around the banjo fittings.  This after I got new copper washers and annealed them so they would crush properly.  I found an article on this problem and they recommended these washers...

 

384508612_brakewasher.JPG.8b4a5be60050954a2854d9d153e2d04c.JPG

 

Funny, since I just bought some smaller ones for my transmission leak problem.  Has anyone tried these on brake fittings?  The article, from The Toolbox site, says they work every time.  They have no skin in the game and do not advertise this product, so maybe it's legit.

I have silicon brake fluid in the system, and I suspect this may be part of the problem.  I have heard it is more prone to leak than conventional fluid.  Nothing else in the system leaks, all my brake line fittings (which I made and flared myself) are fine.  Same with the master cylinder.  It's an ongoing and annoying problem, so I may give these washers a try.

 

 

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OK, I take my doubt back about Homosote. The web site says " Homasote products are non-toxic, wax emulsified for moisture- and mold-resistance and integrally protected against termites and fungi". Sounds good. 

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Celetex is an exterior sheathing that is impregnated with a creosote type material and also looks like the original insulator pad. Homosote, to my knowledge was always white and for interior use. We used to make platform boards for toy trains with it.Neither product is in high usage today. Glad to hear that it worked for you!

Edited by jpage (see edit history)

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7 hours ago, Taylormade said:

While crawling around under my car checking on the leak from the bottom of the timing cover (tightening the bolts seems to have almost stopped the problem, nothing is dripping or flowing, but I still can see a tiny bit of oil seeping) I discovered another problem.  My brake lines are still leaking around the banjo fittings.  This after I got new copper washers and annealed them so they would crush properly.  I found an article on this problem and they recommended these washers...

 

384508612_brakewasher.JPG.8b4a5be60050954a2854d9d153e2d04c.JPG

 

Funny, since I just bought some smaller ones for my transmission leak problem.  Has anyone tried these on brake fittings?  The article, from The Toolbox site, says they work every time.  They have no skin in the game and do not advertise this product, so maybe it's legit.

I have silicon brake fluid in the system, and I suspect this may be part of the problem.  I have heard it is more prone to leak than conventional fluid.  Nothing else in the system leaks, all my brake line fittings (which I made and flared myself) are fine.  Same with the master cylinder.  It's an ongoing and annoying problem, so I may give these washers a try.

 

 

I’ve always used the dowty seals when I can - brakes, oil, fuel - and never had a problem.

 

Ive also found with Cooper washers they are not always that soft from new and sometimes re-annealing them can make a big difference.

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I'm working on the wood floors of the body.  It seems strange that they still used wood for the flooring in 1932, but it is what it is.  I would have loved to use the original floors (there are four pieces) but I couldn't. 

 

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The tops of the pieces is in pretty good shape, but at some point a previous owner had the bottom of the car sprayed with some sort of asphalt rustproofing and this stuff is impossible to get off.  It clogs up any type of sandpaper I've tried to use, and heat is only going to set the wood on fire.

 

Nice top surface...

 

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Crummy bottom...

 

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Plus the floorboard around the transmission area was badly degraded by years of water leaking through the cowl vents.  You can

see the delaminating plywood.

 

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I'm cutting the new floor pieces out of marine plywood, which uses waterproof glue and is designed to stand up against moisture and wet conditions.

 

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Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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