Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

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Oh man, if it isn't one thing it's another! A quick fix might be the old "stop leak" stuff. As I recall it's a bit like paper mache. It might affect  cooling capacity(?) but probably not much. No doubt there would be arguments against it but it was used and this is a tiny leak. Good luck!

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18 minutes ago, Taylormade said:

I'm starting to think my car may be better suited to a museum rather than driving it on the road.  I filled up the radiator the other day and came out to the garage this morning to discover water on the garage floor.  At first I thought the lower radiator hose clamps weren't  tight enough, so I tightened them up and wiped all the excess water away.  That's when I discovered it wasn't a leaky hose connection, but a problem with the radiator itself.  My old radiator was toast and I found a good one (I thought) at Hershey.  When I got it home, I took it to a radiator shop and had it cleaned and checked.  They said everything was A-Okay.  It turns out everything isn't A-Okay and the water is coming from a pinhole in the lower radiator fitting connection.   You can see it in the photo below.  If you wide it away, the tiny bubble forms within a few seconds

 

IMG_0859.thumb.JPG.76f72a3887e1063e9c10ebccceefc0b9.JPG

 

Naturally, I have the radiator on the car, with the shell attached, hoses attached - the works.  I am assuming that some sort of solder repair is the fix for this situation, but I'm no expert.  If soldering would fix it, I'm trying to figure out if it could be done with the radiator in place.  I'd obviously have to remove the hoses and put some sort of heat shield around the fitting so I don't un-solder it from the radiator, but there is enough room to work on it.  Another option might be JB Weld, but I'm not sure if it would work in this situation.  If I cleaned the area thoroughly, made sure it was completely dry, and covered it with the JB do you think it would hold?  We are talking about hot water here.  The good news is that this isn't a pressurized system, so there won't be that much stress on the repair.

 

Any thoughts appreciated.

 

I would contact the radiator shop and see what they have to say.  Considering they checked out the rad and gave it the O.K. I would expect them to fix it for free.

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I agree, but  I have moved since then and would really like to avoid taking the entire front of the car off to get the radiator out so I could take it to them.  They are now 100 miles away.

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Having just been through a radiator job, I feel your pain. But I am afraid the only good job here is one by a radiator shop. You might like to take the old radiator along; the bottom fitting might not be so corroded on that one.

 

A cheap fix might be to put a self tapping screw in the hole with a rubber washer under it!

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I must preface this comment by stating that I am yet to put water in my DA radiator. However, a couple of years ago I had my radiator dismantled cleaned by a radiator specialist near here. He came recommended as someone familiar with working on old radiators. When I picked it up, he commented on it being pretty good, but also said that because of its age, there may be a weep or two when in use. He recommended NOT to use any standard additive, only distilled water plus soluble oil like we used to do before additives were available. This also meant (and he advised to do this) that you could use "Silver Seal Radiator Sealant" if there were any leaks. As I said, I have not yet done this for the DA, but I have used this product (and also a very similar Gold product which I cannot get here anymore) for a number of years with great success in a number of vehicles, most recently in my old tractor. It is a small file of what looks like silver metal filings that you add to the water. I have never had any luck with the cans of liquid stuff (Bars Leaks) but this stuff works great and in fact is stocked by at least a couple of radiator repairers that I know of, but is sometimes hard to get at other places around here. I now always carry some in my 4X4 and historic vehicle in case of mishaps.

I think it may cause reaction with some additives, that is why only water and soluble oil was recommended.

Google it and have a look.

Good luck

 

 

 

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My experience has been that "stop leak" additives don't work well in non-pressurized coolant systems. Stop leak needs pressure to force treated coolant out the hole until the hole seals. Zeke

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My tractor is not pressurised and the additive works great, in fact it is the only type that I have ever used successfully. I last used it in a mate's car that blew out a welsh plug (300 Km from home). We plugged it with a piece of wood then used Silver Seal to seal it. We left the radiator cap not done up tight so that there was no pressure to blow out the piece of wood. It lasted some months that way before he got around to fixing it properly. Silver Seal must be added when engine at running temperature and the engine kept running for some time.

I have always been reluctant to use such additives if I can avoid it, and if I it was in a modern vehicle that I could fix properly, I would and have always done so. 

But my previous experience with this stuff means that I will not hesitate to use it in the DA when the time comes.

But each to his own, of course.

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My son has soldered radiators in place using just a propane torch, keeping from heating too much & affecting solder elsewhere in the radiator. He says: drain the radiator, of course, clean the leak with steel wool, use flux and solder it. He has used the sliver seal which works ok but the solder is a more reliable perminant fix. I think you said the leak was reachable in place.

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I would not be afraid of the Barsleak. I have used it successfully.

I am told that GM supplies some leak proofing with every one of their Target Master replacement engines.

Follow the instructions. I am sure that you are supposed to run the engine at temperature at least after the application.

Don't start the engine without at least water in it as you may damage the water pump.

 

By the way, I have repaired radiators on the race cars with a hot glue gun. Usually aluminum radiators.

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Well, I had a come to Jesus moment with the guys down at the local auto parts store, small town America, where everyone has an opinion - including three customers, two countermen, both who worked in radiator shops in the past, and the owner.  Unanimous conclusion - take the radiator out and have it repaired correctly.  So I’m off to Effingham, Illinois, a sixty mile trip one way,  to the only radiator shop in the area that still works on old radiators.  They come highly recommended, so fingers crossed.  First I have to take the hood bracing off, take the radiator and shell off the car without chipping my newly painted fenders, remove the radiator shell without scratching the new chrome, load the radiator into the SUV, and head out on yet another road trip.  It is really frustrating to have to disassemble and reassemble something you thought was ready to go.  But I want to drive this car - to the Springfield, Missouri National Meet next year - so it needs to be dependable.

Now, pardon me while I throw up.

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)
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Hang in there. I know how very frustrating it can get. Just when you thought it was all under control....

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Radiator out, shell stripped off, ready to take a shower and head to the radiator shop.  No damage, no problems, lots of sweat and skinned knuckles.

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I feel the pain. How easy is it to get the radiator in the shell? I got the radiator shop to put mine in - it was a tight fit.

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I too feel your pain. At the end of the day, the solution that you are confident with is always the right choice.

Good luck.

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3 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

I feel the pain. How easy is it to get the radiator in the shell? I got the radiator shop to put mine in - it was a tight fit.

 

Pretty easy, it just slips in and out.  It’s held in by five flathead screws and nuts on each side and two on the top.  The only problem is the screw heads are under the welt padding that is riveted to the shell.  Luckily, it’s flexible enough to work the screw out with a little effort.  I’ll shoot some pix when I put it back together.

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And only two hours.

I had  a mechanic once that was getting to many come backs.

He told me that any job worth doing is worth doing twice.  (and he wanted to be paid twice)

He wasn't around after that.

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I am greatful that you tagged me in this build forum, my transmission just started making noise, when I back up the Transmission makes a bell ringing sound every few seconds and when I drive forward, the transmission has a slight ticking sound. I know think I will have to remove the transmission to rebuild or repair it. not sure, but I guess its just in need of a resto. 

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Glad you were able to remove without damaging anything.  I had no doubt you would!     frank

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Picked up the radiator yesterday with leak repaired and everything pressure tested for any other leaks.  Everything checked out fine.  Total cost - 25 bucks.  Putting everything back together tomorrow.  My extra fabric arrives from LB tomorrow and I’ll get that over to the upholstery shop so he can finish my seats.  Planning  on getting the motor started this weekend, then making new floorboards.

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Put the radiator back in last weekend.  Some interesting details in this assembly.

First, the water leak that started the problem.

 

306768326_IMG_0859-Copy.thumb.jpg.79915cc54a150355fd080c62d848e84f.jpg

 

And the repair.  The area cleaned and soldered.

 

IMG_0863.thumb.jpg.2bd9d0549ce59254d6f30cc63cdb6e33.jpg

 

The lower section of the radiator has this stamped steel piece that, I believe, helps direct air up and into the radiator.

 

55967884_IMG_0864-Copy.thumb.jpg.b3bf5ab0197b0cdd677ba1f41a60cc9d.jpg

 

It attaches with these screw head bolts and nuts.  Thankfully, they didn't break when I took things apart.  I don't know where I'd ever find replacements.

 

IMG_0868.thumb.jpg.2dfedc325a6b21cd25d2714c96602f4e.jpg

 

They go through the honeycomb of the radiator.  This obviously would be a major problem if the radiator was re-cored with a modern core.

Here are the bolts in place.

 

IMG_0870.thumb.jpg.bdd2d8a5ad8f2b3ec7df1d93a142ec78.jpg

 

Here you can see the scoop on the radiator.

 

IMG_0866.thumb.jpg.935e211cf936e5b21a42fecf10889a6f.jpg

 

Everything assembled and ready to go.  Now I dropped it into the grill shell.  Everything fit perfectly - for a change.

 

IMG_0871.thumb.jpg.6b5542fe33f50cc52071a32537884801.jpg

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The radiator attaches to the shell with flat head slotted screws and nuts. 

The pain is you have to stretch the hood lace away enough to get the screw in there and then get a screwdriver

on it to tighten things down.  It's a long and tricky process.

 

IMG_0872.thumb.jpg.af81f838ceb414acc06808a63f57a6d2.jpg

 

Then it was time to put everything back on the car.  Lots of protection for the fenders.

 

IMG_0874.thumb.jpg.25b688a3aa9472841387debecac17326.jpg

 

Things went smoothly and the shell dropped into place with no damage, scratches, cursing or other problems. 

Filled with distilled water after hooking the hoses back up and no leaks or other difficulties,

 

IMG_0875.thumb.jpg.2796ce933c4aff451914fd2150b96d24.jpg

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That is EXCELLENT news! Hopefully, your next post will include a video of a very smooth running 1932 Dodge Brothers sedan!

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I noticed there is a big hole in the upper radiator tank. Do you have the thermostatically controlled radiator vanes? I do not see the control on the engine....

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31 minutes ago, keiser31 said:

I noticed there is a big hole in the upper radiator tank. Do you have the thermostatically controlled radiator vanes? I do not see the control on the engine....

 

As far as I know, all 32 radiators have that hole.  My car did not come with the thermostatically controlled shutters.  The original owner opted for side-mounts and wire wheels, but no shutters.

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So, I've taken over 4000 photos during the restoration of Daphne.  Apparently, that just wasn't enough.  I'm going through the exhaust system, getting ready to hook everything up.  As I documented in earlier posts, I had the mounting bracket just behind the muffler remade (mine was missing) and the frame bracket re-vulcanized by Then And Now Automotive.  So, all I had left was the rear mounting bracket.  The problem is, I have two bags labelled "rear exhaust mount." 

 

This one...

 

IMG_0877.thumb.jpg.5f8fc1ee7f927f47227e819d110aaffc.jpg 

 

And this one...

 

IMG_0884.thumb.jpg.c812c2329f93b64bd733ab8297843f65.jpg

 

I went back through my frame disassembly photos and found these.  It's obviously the first bracket, here on the rear of the frame...

 

IMG_2199.thumb.jpg.5e98fa34dd96776174ad47ce34417f09.jpg

 

And here in a shot where i had the frame turned over.

 

IMG_3206.thumb.jpg.ee8d6e4e43e31b3c81d0a56bdb93ab3d.jpg

 

This looks like a jury-rigged setup to me.  The other bracket looks a lot more substantial, but i can't find a single

photograph of it on the frame.  Exhaust systems are one of the items that have usually been changed on these old

cars, so what is original and what isn't is always a crap shoot.  If anyone has a 32 (or even a 31) with what they think

is an original exhaust system, I'd be curious if there is anything like bracket two under there.

 

How it got into the bag (with my writing on it) where is came from, and what it actually is, remain a mystery. 

I have come across a few bags with leftover parts from my long gone 48 Plymouth, but I never did anything to

the exhaust on that car.

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