Bleach

Vintage Hearses, Funeral Coaches and Flower Cars On Main Street Anywhere: A Pictorial

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I just can't seem to shake the image of this thing doing an involuntary wheelie up a steep San Francisco hill. Just absolutely pathetic and hilarious all at once. I'm also envisioning my people, the Irish, using something like this for a rolling wake. Lord knows if they would ever show up at the cemetery.

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Edited by Hudsy Wudsy (see edit history)

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Now that I see you're taking ambulances... By Yellerspirit

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Northeast Harbor's first ambulance, parked in front of the Fire Station and Municipal Offices. The Packard was purchased in 1937 and cost $4000

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I found this particular last ride so remarkably artistic and dramatic that I looked into it a little. It's one of those Spanish hearses referred to earlier from a Hemmings blog.

Spanishfuneralcars_02_1500.jpg

This hearse is based on a 1928 Latil, a French truck manufacturer that was in business from 1898 to 1955. I haven't been able to determine who did the coachwork. The statue of the weeping woman depicts "La LLorona", a mythic woman who figures in Spanish and Latin American lore. She drowned her three children in order to win the heart of the man she loved. When she died, she was turned away from the gates of Heaven and told that she must find her lost children in order to be saved. Thus, she was condemned to wander the earth in tears searching for them. There are a two more photos of it at the Hemmings blog site:

hearses and flower cars | Hemmings Blog: Classic and collectible cars and parts

I think that one of the things that I find so very striking and unique about it is the copper colored base coat that appears to be misted over with a black antiquing. If you look closely, you'll notice the spots on the front fenders where the black mist top coat is missing. If any of you see it differently, please correct me. I'm mostly just guessing on my assessment of it. If it is, however as I guess it to be, it's seems somewhat ahead of it's time paint-wise. Regardless of the technique, it makes for a gorgeous effect, doesn't it?

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I came across this picture of a Lasalle in a big hurry. It's from "Dr No" ('62) which, I think, was the first James Bond movie. If you go to the Internet Movie Car Data Base site you'll see photos of it hurtling off of a cliff. Not to fear, though! If you look closely at the stills you'll see that it turns miracously into an English Humber before it explodes at the bottom of the cliff. Where the LaSalle is now is anybody's guess, but at least it didn't meet it's doom that particular day.

Here's the Internet Movie Car Data Base site: IMCDb.org: 1939 LaSalle Funeral Coach Miller Combination [series 50] in "Dr. No, 1962"

i011838.jpg

Edited by Hudsy Wudsy (see edit history)

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^^^ Clowns still give me the creeps.

Here's an unknown vintage hearse from the UK possibly.

800px-Hearse_-_Bodywork_by_O%27Gormans.jpg

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Faith and Begorrah! I never knew that there were Irish coach builders! O'Gormans was located in Clonmel, County Tipperary, Ireland. Here's a link to a short Wiki article about them:

O'Gorman Coach Builders - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

They did some nice work. Since the O'Gorman's were Ford dealers, the car in the photo is a Ford. Now I know why it looked very familiar to me.

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This is an awesome thread keep them coming! Is it just me or do the South Americans take their hearses to whole new levels? Completely hand carved body sections are pure art. Did any of these ever make it to the states?

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The French word for hearse is "corbillard". "Chevrolet" is, obviously, a French name. Maybe it follows that the French feel some affinity for Chevrolets. Here are some Corbillards Chevrolets a la Francais:

'63 Chev:

chevrolet_corbillard_1963_france.jpg

More Chevs:

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQzaMWPK0VVekhWLTXY3k3pTD36IjkrB9SObuxDD2lIr85aH_VtKQ

S0-Corbillard-tuning-le-comble-du-mauvais-gout-140517.jpg

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pics-med-13659-296592-chevrolet-impala-corbillard-1958.jpgpics-med-13659-296593-chevrolet-impala-corbillard-1958.jpg

corbillard19ke.jpg

Is it the angle, or are these '64s stretched?:

8371497028_f575facc83_z.jpg

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Edited by Hudsy Wudsy (see edit history)

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8371497028_f575facc83_z.jpg

The '64s are most certainly stretched as seen by the extra rear quarter window on both cars.

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A Swedish "likvagn" based on a Volvo.

begravningsbil.jpg

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A vintage Swedish likvagn photo from 1932.

image?type=IMAGE&uri=http%3A%2F%2Fbild.ylm.se%2FTheodor1%2FStora%2F10167.jpg&size=FULL_DOC

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Another vintage Swedish likvagn.

1M16_A88318.JPG

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Another vintage Swedish hearse.

010x1930%20Skoda%206R%20%20sodomka.JPG

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A 1936 Finnish Chevrolet hearse.

chevrolet_1.jpg

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