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Vintage Hearses, Funeral Coaches and Flower Cars On Main Street Anywhere: A Pictorial


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I am the owner of the "modern" Packard shown here. I have spent the past hour typing and retyping a brief history of both this car and of the company that built it, but these forums refuse to accept my post, so I give up. Short answer, it is based on a 1985 Buick Riviera. Longer version, follow this link....

http://www.coachbuilt.com/bui/b/bayliff/bayliff.htm

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^ Guess that proves the first three letter of funeral........ :rolleyes:
Per the web site where I found the pic the woman is the photog's mother. She is a cancer survivor and has her pic taken in the casket alongside the hearse every birthday. Her and her son build the casket.

In other words, she has a healthy outlook on life!

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As much as I admire all of the intricate cast and carved embellishments on these, I really have to applaud the sheet metal benders who crafted that beautiful roof on this '56:

184932d1364432240-vintage-hearses-funeral-coaches-flower-cars-image.jpg

that is a 1954 Cadillac, not a 1956. Charles Coker, 1953 Pontiac tech advisor.
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  • 1 month later...

The Ford was modified by the Shop of Siebert, a company that started out in 1853 making buggies. They shifted their focus in the 1880's to commercial vehicles including funeral wagons. They used Fords exclusively from the mid teens all the way into the 60's. I think they "closed shop" in 1966.

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Nice looking Pontiac, tin. Good proportions and simple, clean lines. Do you see a paint job for it in the future, or are you going to keep it as is?

Thanks, at this point in time there is no real plan to paint it. I know the paint is shoddy, but the old saying applies, "they're only original once"

I've had many many people say not to paint it coz of the patina it has.

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  • 4 weeks later...
My '54 Pontiac built by Superior. Number 206 of 207 that year.

new_001.jpg

Your landau bars are mounted upside down. Theround "bump" in the center is always up. If the top were actually to fold with the landaus mounted as they are the folded irons would stick out behind the body. A commonly seen mistake on many antiques and one of my pet peeves.

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  • 2 months later...

The landau bars are 100% correct the way they are.

Your landau bars are mounted upside down. Theround "bump" in the center is always up. If the top were actually to fold with the landaus mounted as they are the folded irons would stick out behind the body. A commonly seen mistake on many antiques and one of my pet peeves.

LandauBars_zps853ac291.jpg

Edited by Evilstretch (see edit history)
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Sorry, your landaus are wrong. Think about it. If they were real folding landaus the pivot point would be in the middle of the round "knob" and they would extend out past the back of the body if actually folded. Find a factory pic and prove me wrong and I will happily admit defeat!

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Not saying the landaus weren't installed that way at the factory. A review of vintage hearse pictures shows them both ways but functionally speaking, if they were real they would have to be installed with the bump in the center facing up. And, after all, aren't they meant to mimic a convertible top?

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64519.jpg

A custom coach made to look like a modern Packard?

This is one of the last Bayliff-Packard vehicles and an online slide show is available and also an article with more details, all of which were sent to me by the former owner. Apparently two were built on special order and Bayliff, at the time, owned the Packard name.

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Your landau bars are mounted upside down. Theround "bump" in the center is always up. If the top were actually to fold with the landaus mounted as they are the folded irons would stick out behind the body. A commonly seen mistake on many antiques and one of my pet peeves.
Sorry, your landaus are wrong. Think about it. If they were real folding landaus the pivot point would be in the middle of the round "knob" and they would extend out past the back of the body if actually folded. Find a factory pic and prove me wrong and I will happily admit defeat!
Not saying the landaus weren't installed that way at the factory. A review of vintage hearse pictures shows them both ways but functionally speaking, if they were real they would have to be installed with the bump in the center facing up. And, after all, aren't they meant to mimic a convertible top?

Hearses are NOT convertibles. Regardless of the amount of life experiences Restorer32 has, none of them obviously have been first hand with hearses. A hearse's landau irons were never meant to mimic those on a convertible top - ever. Nor have there been working, folding landau irons on hearse - ever. These were dignified design cues meant to swoop from upper window frame gracefully downward. When the center section is not balanced symmetrically, the bulk goes BELOW center line without exception. Doing so not only appear more aesthetically balanced but more importantly does not break eye's sweeping downward gaze when viewing, as designers intended.

[There is ONE exception; which is not on a hearse (but related). When some formal Series 75 received short stubby non-working landau irons on C pillar, then yes, the bulk of center section points upward. Those are meant to mimic a convertible. Again, not a hearse.]

Do you think Meteor would have used this early (rare) prewer landau photographed in front of their own factory for period advertising with an upside down landau? Not a chance.

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Or were you asking for factory printed lit?

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Or would you prefer I continue with factory photos?

14761148067_f3f6793532_b.jpg

If this hasn't been enough, you can try picking up any 1 of about 18 books on professional cars that have been published since 1973. Or you can continue assuming every landau iron ever put on by (minimum) 10 coach builders has been "incorrect".

Edited by R W Burgess (see edit history)
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