Jump to content

Can't Get Brake Drum Off a 1930 Franklin


Bill Jewell
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello,

I recently acquired a 1930 Franklin 145. I am attempting to get one of the rear brake drums off to work on the brakes and cannot get the drum to budge. The brake pads do not appear to be holding it. I went to the auto supply store to rent a hub puller and it is much too small for the lug bolt pattern. Can anyone assist me with this?

Thanks!

Bill Jewell

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sure about how wide the spacings are on a Franklin, but the Mopars from the 40's and 50's ( up to around 62?) used a keyed on drum that required a heavy puller as well. You might want to check with someone familiar with those cars. The one I borrowed was a large cast unit designed to smack with a big hammer... those early drums can be very stubborn. No place for a wussy Chinese puller.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Shown are two types of drum puller for drums that fit a keyed and tapered axle shaft end. Packard, Chrysler, and others used this type of drum attachment for decades and these pullers are common, either for sale new (about $175), often found for rent, or perhaps you can borrow one from another hobbyst. The one in use is on an early 30s Packard. When you go to pull the drum, leave the retaining nut on by a few threads so the drum doesn't come off abruptly and go flying across the room and damage you or it. And when you reassemble, NEVER use any lubricant on the axle taper or drum hub, it should be a dry fit.

post-49751-143141812613_thumb.jpg

post-49751-143141812615_thumb.jpg

Edited by Owen_Dyneto (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I completely agree with Owen above. I have a puller exactly like the first pix. The arm for striking the tool can be removed. The end of the shaft has a hex that an air impact wrench can be applied. 150 pounds of air with a 1/2 drive will usually do the job. If not, heat the hub with a acetylene torch while the puller has pressure on it. If it doesn't pop loose now, put the arm on and strike it sharply with a 4-5 pound hammer. As Owen stated above, BE SURE the hex nut is partially threaded on the axel shaft. This method has never failed me. Oh, be sure the lug nuts securing the puller arms are tight to the drum.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 weeks later...

Steve , The wire wheel hub/drums also have the the threaded area where the screw on puller can be screwed on. I had a drum I could not get off. And Ive taken off most likely over 100 of them on various makes over the years. I backed the nut off about three turns and drove the car about 3 miles and it broke free. Be carefull using any puller to leave the nut on to preserve the end of the axles threads. Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...