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jeff_a

Owners of 1924 Peerless Model 6-70 Cars

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A third Peerless 6-70 has been found: a 1925 6-70 Five Passenger Touring Phaeton in excellent condition. It will be up for auction in S.E. Saskatchewan on September 15th by Mack Auction Company of Estevan, SK, Canada. There will be 18 antique other cars(including: ´23 Buick Touring project, restored ´37 Packard 120 Convertible Sedan, ´30 Erskine Regal Coupe project, ´65 Mercury Pickup restomod) and a Cessna plane in the sale...about 100 miles north of Minot, ND. That makes two 6-70 5-P Phaetons and one 6-70 5-P Sedan known out of 2,786 built.

 

6.jpg

6A.jpg

 6B.jpgThe Peerless Six-70s have aluminum 289 Cu. In. Collins sixes designed by the Cadillac Engineering Dept. & built by Peerless for 14,000 Peerless 6-70, 6-72, 6-90, & 6-91 models 1924-1929.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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This great car sold at the Rose Hansen Auction yesterday for $11,000 Canadian to someone from Sidney, Montana:

Image may contain: car

 

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Yeah, it's gold-plated compared to the deal on the nearly identical one 12 years ago.

 

In reply to a November 12th post estimating the USD conversion would be about $9,000 and thought the poster might be able to pay that if able to find the new owner. The conversion would have made it $7,700 USD unless there were more auction fees. I go to the town the new owner lives in a lot, but have not been able find who they are. It'll probably pop up on some sale venue next year. For those in the antique automobile business, it would probably turn out to be an astute purchase to get something like that, if that 's what happens. Unless there are some serious deficiencies in the '25 Peerless not visible in the photos, the time to buy it was at the auction. It was a good sale to go to...a farm auction with better-than-average vehicles...in an area not picked over by "pickers"...and most of the items had been in the same collection for decades(not sold and resold on the auction circuit like a lot of cars).

 

Who knows -- the new owners might cherish the car for what it is -- 1 of 3 Survivors from 2,786 Peerless Six-70s built in 1924 & 1925 -- and keep it a long time. The nice Packard 120 Convertible Sedan at the sale sold for closer to a price I expected than the Peerless(I think it fetched over $30,000 CDN vs. $11,000 CDN)....despite being a cheaper car when new. Regarding deficiencies, one of the locals at the sale did say some of the cars kept indoors had not been run in 30 or 40 years, so it's not like these cars were started every month and driven on tours..

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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I tried to tell a lot of people about the auction, here on the forums and elsewhere, but it was "too far away to attend". Of course, for an extra 400 bucks one could have phoned in a bid and never shown up. The Facebook comments(over 100) were like this:

  • My uncle will def buy this!
  • I want dad to buy this for me!
  • Would make a great rat rod. (no, riveting together junkyard bits will make a great rat rod)
  • Jay Leno will come to this sale and buy it.(yeah, he buys all antique cars)
  • Wayne Carini will hear about this and fly here(Glen Ewen, SK?).
  • I bet the Packard and this were gangster-owned!

So, not a real heavy concentration of antique car authorities to draw on in that part of the province. 

 

Anyone could have bought the car for any reason, I suppose. Sidney, Montana isn't known as an antique car mecca, but it has more $ going through it than anyplace in, say, Iowa, Kansas, or Idaho. It's in the middle of the Bakken Field oil boom. The last time I went to the Wells Fargo bank in Sidney, the guy in line in front of me dumped 32 grand in cash out of his briefcase for a deposit. No big deal there. The McDonald's there was closed a couple days a week for several years because they couldn't staff it 7 days with wages of only $15 an hour. Sidney is less than 200 miles from the auction, so a short drive for a prestigious  Roaring Twenties car may have been the right combination.

 

The 10/17/18 post in the "New Peerless Discovered" thread shows nice photos of all 3 known Peerless 6-70s. I arranged  3 pics of the 3 cars next to each other with the same 3/4 view. The car you are talking about in Maine is a 6-72, not a 6-70. The family probably still has it. A big difference appearance-wise(rad shell, hood, rear deck* of coupes and roadsters), time-wise(1924 and 3 months of 1925 vs.1925, 1926, and 1927), and in production numbers(2,786 vs. 5,550). Mechanically they were the same. Spock would say the analogy is almost like comparing a '79 Camaro and a '79 Firebird, except the 6-70 & 6-72 weren't produced concurrently, as were the Camaro & Firebird.

 

Survivors: three  6-70 Peerlesses.......nine 6-72 Peerlesses, that I know of.

 

 

* Peerless' Coupes and Roadsters did not have boattail rear decks in 1924, but after the April, 1925 appearance of the Model Six-72 they did, as well as on the Model 6-80('26-'28), Six-60('27-'28), Six-90('27), Six-91('28), and Eight-69('26-'28). 

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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The 1925 Peerless 6-70 Sedan in North Carolina has just changed hands.

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Question on the 6-70 that sold to someone in Sidney, Montana - do you or could you get that contact information?  That car and the Maine car (6-72) are essentially heirloom cars that would be used for benchmarks provided anyone ever restored the L.A.- Montana car now owned by Bill.

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I don't know, Bryan. I was never able to find who it is. I faxed a data sheet for the auction company to fill out before the sale...they couldn't find it, not returned. I also emailed them after the sale to get the new owner's name...cannot be provided due to privacy laws. Both the '25 Peerless & the '37 Packard went for less than a chrome job on a 50s blob-mobile, and it would have been a great auction to hit. Too bad S.E. Saskatchewan doesn't overlap with your family's idea of a dream September vacation or you might have attended. I'm up around there all the time, but in June. If you had been there, could you have afforded 11,000 CDN/7,700 USD? What would you have done with it? Or were you thinking about someone else or just as a theoretical?

 

In theory and in hindsight it looks like a good buy -- but word on the street was the farmer put together most of his informal museum 30 or 40 years ago and hadn't driven them since. The auction company copy said "partially restored in the 70s", and "turns over, doesn't start", I think. Despite that, to me, that means a chap buying this versus the '24 6-70 Phaeton would be around a hundred grand ahead.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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Sept. 13, 1923 Automotive Industries, the Automobile, VOL 49, Issues 10-13, p. 522:

 

    "  'Collins Six' Will Soon Join Forces With Peerless

    When R.H. Collins left the General Motors organization, expecting to join forces with W.C. Durant, he developed a six-cylinder car which was to be called the Collins but would have been part of the Durant line.  Before manufacturing plans had been completed he had an opportunity to acquire control of Peerless and disposed of most of his stock in the Durant enterprises. In the relatively short period which has elapsed since then he has brought Peerless out of a deep hole and has turned a heavy loss into a profit. Now, it is understood, he expects soon to begin production of the Collins as a companion to the Peerless. It will be a six-cylinder job and it is reported that it will be in the same general price class with Buick and Studebaker. The lower-priced car will give Peerless dealers an opportunity to go after business which they are not now able to get."

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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