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gonzafj

Chrysler 1929 serie 75, wood on floor - doors and others

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Hello Friends,

I am new in this forum, sorry if I am wrong on section...

Well, I need helpme about wood for a Chrysler 1929 serie 75. I don´t know what type of wood do you use on floor, frame doors and reinforce structure.

picture or photos reinforcing structure?

my english is dire, but treat

regards and Thanks for your answer

gonzafj (Francisco Gonzalez)

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Ash is the best. I used it on a 1929 Plymouth restoration with very good results. it's a hard wood and not all that easy to work, but its durable and flexible. Make sure you screw the new wood framwork together as it was originally done. The structure has to have some flex. A buddy of mine glued everything up tight as a drum on his roadster and the wood started cracking after a few years due to vibration that had no where to go. If you replicate the factory method you'll have the best results.

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Thanks Restorer32 and Taylormade.

Here in Chile is easy get oak. Do you have any special recomended treatment for wood?...I think sealent and varnish

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Francisco;

I used Oak on my Durant to replace much of the wood. The original pieces that were not rotted I left alone, but what I had to replace I used Oak. It too is a hard wood and here in Florida we cannot get Ash or it would be cost prohibitive to have enough shipped down here. Oak should be fine to use.

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If you use oak, make sure it is White Oak not Red Oak. White oak is harder, more durable and in similar environments, White Oak resists buckling, bending and warping better than Red Oak. And use marine plywood on the floors as it's designed to resist moisture.

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I would stay away from Poplar. As an example check the hardness rating for the following woods.

White Oak 1360

Ash 1320

Red Oak 1260

Pine 690

Poplar 540

Poplar is easy to work but does not have the strength for auto body applications. Notice that Ash is slightly softer than White Oak, but Ash is often recommeded due to it's superior flexibility - it can bend better without breaking, yet is still very hard and durable. You won't go wrong with White Oak or Ash.

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Thanks for the imput. I guess Poplar is not the way to go. I only need new floorboards in my car and am not looking forward to lugging around that oak

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For floorboards I'd use marine plywood. Sills should be oak or ash, but it's not necessary for floorboards. My 32 Dodge has the original plywood floorboards and they've held up pretty well. I'm lucky, though, as the rest of the body is all steel. The only wood is the floorboards, some small pieces to nail interior trim to and the top. The 29 Plymouth was a complete wood framwork with the sheet metal nailed over it. A real pain to restore!

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Actually the designation "Marine Plywood" has nothing to do with moisture resistance. It is no more moisture resistant than any exterior grade plywood. "Marine Plywood" has no voids in the interior layers so as to better resist damage from bumping into things when used as the exterior skin on boats.

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There actually is a difference - Marine plywood has five or more layers that are bound together with waterproof adhesive, which allows it to bear heavier loads and repel moisture from its core. As a result, you can use a thinner sheet that will have the strength of a thicker, regular sheet of plywood. Regular plywood has fewer layers with little spaces and air pockets in each layer, marine plywood has substantially fewer. Exterior plywood layers are stuck together with a lower-grade glue that is - as you stated - further compromised by the voids between the layers. It is often water-resistant instead of waterproof. It's the waterproof glue that makes Marine plywood more desirable.

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There actually is a difference - Marine plywood has five or more layers that are bound together with waterproof adhesive, which allows it to bear heavier loads and repel moisture from its core. As a result, you can use a thinner sheet that will have the strength of a thicker, regular sheet of plywood. Regular plywood has fewer layers with little spaces and air pockets in each layer, marine plywood has substantially fewer. Exterior plywood layers are stuck together with a lower-grade glue that is - as you stated - further compromised by the voids between the layers. It is often water-resistant instead of waterproof. It's the waterproof glue that makes Marine plywood more desirable.

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I replaced the wood in my 29 Dodge bros truck and used white oak. Works out real well if you have the skills and correct tools available.

You will need to understand the way the the wood is rough sawn to determine where it is best used. Some rough sawn woods are priced buy method cut.

My floor board was plywood also. I will use marine grade.

thanks for suggestion of not glueing the connections.

post-71470-143141815635_thumb.jpg

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Just a bit more on Marine Plywood.

It is a lot stronger because all the layers used have no knots in them and therefore no voids as already stated but also the grain direction on all the layers are positioned at 45 degrees to the layer next to it for maximum strength. In normal ply the grain can be going in any direction to get the maximum use out of all the wood layers as it is being made.

Also as stated the glue is much more superior to type used in waterproof ply. If you look at the edge of a marine ply sheet you can see the glue lines are black but on waterproof ply they are clear and you can't see the glue at all.

Apart from the A grade finish on the surface of both sides of the sheet (but some waterproof ply has that also) the glue lines are about the only way you can identify it is marine grade.

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The 1930 Fisher Body Service Manual instructs you to glue and screw most of the body joints to make the body as rigid as possible. If the wooden frame is not made rigid and allowed to flex it will squeek, the paint and metal panels will crack and the screws will work loose.

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The 1930 Fisher Body Service Manual instructs you to glue and screw most of the body joints to make the body as rigid as possible. If the wooden frame is not made rigid and allowed to flex it will squeek, the paint and metal panels will crack and the screws will work loose.

I don't claim to be an expert on Fisher Bodies and you may be correct.

When I restored my 1929 Plymouth U all of the top wood and the floor sills were rotten and had to be replaced. This meant a total disassembly of the body. The car was a two door. Chrysler designed it so everthing behind the doors came off in one piece - actually it was three pieces welded together but acted it as a single unit in removal. That left me with the doors - some wood for support, and the front cowl with wood supports for the winshield area and door hinges. The only wood in the car that was glued together were the two large roof beams on each side above the doors. They were so large the factory opted to make them out of several pieces glued together with finger joints. The rest of the wood framework came apart when I unscrewed the screws and bolts holding them together. They were never glued together. This wasn't a situation where the glue dried out or anything, it was obvious from the surface of the joints that no glue had ever been used. The uprights were held to the floor with metal castings and locked into the top beams with a mortise and tenon joint held together with a screw - no glue.

Fisher Bodies must have had a different method. I know most of the bodies in the twenties consisted of many smaller panels nailed to the wood framework with the joints covered by a decorative strip. They didn't have the larger, more solid one-piece back and probably needed the glue. Like I said, I'm no expert, but I do know that the gentleman who helped me with the woodwork told me, "If the factory didn't glue it, don't you glue it." The car was squeak free and solid as a rock.

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We have rewooded several dozen bodies, most were glued. Bacteria loves that old hide glue so just because there was no evidence of glue doesn't mean it wasn't there originally.

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I surrender. In my case there was plenty of evidence in the joints that were glued. I do find it hard to beleive that other joints would be free of any traces, but as I stated, I'm no expert. One car does not qualify me to give anything but an opinion based on limited experience.

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I didn't say you're was not glued just that most cars we have seen were glued. There are always exceptions.

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On 21/3/2013 at 9:47 AM, gonzafj said:

Hello Friends,

I am new in this forum, sorry if I am wrong on section...

Well, I need helpme about wood for a Chrysler 1929 serie 75. I don´t know what type of wood do you use on floor, frame doors and reinforce structure.

picture or photos reinforcing structure?

my english is dire, but treat

regards and Thanks for your answer

gonzafj (Francisco Gonzalez)

Hello Fco

 

I allso have a 1929 Chrysler needing woodwork 

Allso in Chile.

Did you found drawings for sills or other woodparts ??

 

 

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