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Paint colors for 1933 Plymouth PD Convertible Coupe


1935EB
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  • 2 weeks later...

post-78478-143142642634_thumb.jpgHi All,

Just bought this picture off of ebay. Always looking for period correct photos. Here are a few notable observations;

1) photo dated May 3, 1934 from Acme Photography (New York City) (stating 1933 Dodge convertible coupe)

2) photo is to advertise the "electrically heated women's scarf via the cigar lighter"

3) several posts ago, Scott B posted an artists rendition (car in parked in front of a theater) of a 1933 Dodge Cabriolet. It was noted that the driver door (top of door to the first reveal) was painted a different color, orange like. If you zoom in on this photo you will see that this car is painted in the same location with a lighter color.

Mike

Edited by jed85
I think it is a 1934 Dodge Cabriolet, due to the hood vents (see edit history)
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Following are some pictures of the instrument cluster. The oval cover plate is nickel plated, glass has been cleaned. There is a round rubber seal about 1/16 inch similar to a large o-ring that is sandwiched between the glass and the instrument case. I carefully wiped the dust from the face of the main instrument panel being careful to not scratch it or remove the reflective gold paint. The pictures show the actual instruments they have not yet been wiped down.

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The instrument case will need a light sandblasting and it looks like it is gray on the outside and flat white on the inside.

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As most temperature gauges go they all seem to need attention and this one is missing the bulb that goes into the cylinder head. Some guys in the Vintage Chevy Club use "The Temperature Gauge Guy" ( Mr. Martin in Burlington VT 802-862-6374 ). He can repair and has information on most temperature gauges, including the tubing length, bulb size, threaded retainer nut, etc. He will rebuild mine for about 110 to 120 dollars. He will supply new capillary, bulb, and retainer nut. I assume this will be calibrated as well. He will reuse the spring wire that is wrapped around the capillary tubing.

More pictures as this part moves forward.

Thanks for your patience with my recent absence. My Mother has been in the hospital twice in the last two months. I pray for a healthy and speedy recovery. She is 8 years older than this Plymouth and in better condition.

Thanks, Chris

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Mike,

Those inside door panels and the outside door handle escutcheon indicate Dodge or Desoto. 1933 PD Plymouth has oval outside door handle escutcheon.

Chris

That is a GREAT photo! Car is a 34 PE Plymouth. You can see the cutout in the window sill garnish for the lever that throws the 'double acting' front window mechanism, which was unique to the 34--the 33 has a single window, without a breaker window. In addition, those teardrop shaped escutcheons on the outside door handles are 34, and the late 34 models had them like that with the hidden screws. If you look closely you can also see that the handles have the 'winged' and pointed shape of the Plymouth handles instead of the curved inward handles found on the 33-34 Dodge. Chris is right that the 33 Plymouth had oval escutcheons with the screw heads showing. Final tip off is that you can just see the Plymouth PE hood door in the open position--unique to the 34 PE. Now all I need is to find one of those scarf heaters...SMB
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That painted section on the door top is interesting. Most 1933 convertibles I have seen have these and they are red. In a black and white photo red usually appears to be a light gray or even white when it contrasts against a dark color like black or navy blue. The photo shows good detail on the top boot cover. I think this is a 1934 Plymouth as well. It is a shame you cant see any of the top iron detail that would indicate chrome plated or painted (white metal). Chris

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  • 5 weeks later...
I would like to know if the window frames on the 1933 PD convertible are stainless steel or chrome plated? thank you Erick
I believe they are actually a steel frame with a stainless shell crimped over the top. Or they are in fact chromed steel. I have a NOS or very early takeout 33 Plymouth convertible coupe window and frame assembly, picture attached. While it looks like stainless steel, it holds a magnet. If you look closely at the inside edge of the channel, you can see that the edge appears to be crimped over, perhaps over a steel core. Chris has a set of 33 frames he got from me which do not have the glass in them so he can probably give you a better idea.

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Keen25 and Scott.

They are made of carbon steel with a thin laminate of stainless steel wrapped over them. They tend to rust from the inside out if water gets in past the seals and glass. The lamination makes it difficult to straighten a bent section as they end up with wrinkles. The stainless part does not rust under normal conditions and does respond to polishing with the right equipment. I will post pictures later when I get a chance. Chris

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Hi Scott and Chris Thank you, once I was given the clue what to look for it became very clear how the stainless steel is on the frame, thank you, Erick

I am posting my progress on the window frame, I am putting in new glass soon. I tried to show some of the rubber part that are in the channel - the two little ones that hold in the draw rod are interestingpost-69877-14314270111_thumb.jpg.

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A few pages back the question of the placement of the holes for the rear tail lights was asked, that question just hit me also. The '33 PD Convertible with rumble seat I am working on had originally only one tail light and during the car's life someone welded in a patch to install an odd set of tail lights. I wonder is the location the same as the sedan, I have attached pictures of ones I have. thank you Erickpost-69877-143142701118_thumb.jpg

post-69877-143142701115_thumb.jpg

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I also found that you can modified a four door sedan's front window regulator to work in the convertible if you need to by cutting the arms down and putting in new holes. Here are some picture of mine. My teeth were to sharp and the gear train shot.post-69877-143142701123_thumb.jpg Erick

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I am posting my progress on the window frame, I am putting in new glass soon. I tried to show some of the rubber part that are in the channel - the two little ones that hold in the draw rod are interesting[ATTACH=CONFIG]267478[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]267479[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]267480[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]267481[/ATTACH].

Bottom channel is steel

The suround is stainless. We have the reproductions that Al Smith had made up. Have about 6 for sale.

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Well things are getting a bit more back to normal now that my Mother is out of the hospital. She is doing well, and thanks for your kind thoughts and prayers.

Since we have had recent input on door window frames I wanted to post photos of the door window frame tracks. I hope these pictures show the detail. I will be sandblasting these and painting them dark gray primer. They attach to the door at the top and bottom.

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They are not lined with rubber or felt but instead the window frame travels on metal rollers. It is important to note that only the convertible had the window glass supported within a metal frame so these may be different from the closed cars.

Some notes. On the one marked driver front (third one up from bottom) you see a small bracket attached with a screw. This bracket is missing on the passenger front. I bought these from a guy who said they came from a '34 Plymouth. The '34 convertible was only available in the 112 inch wheelbase version and only with a vent window that the '33 did not have. I am wondering what this bracket is attached to and if it only was used on '34 models. These window frame tracks are the same as '33 otherwise. In fact I had only one track that came with my car and it matches up with the new ones.

In the center are two piece strips that I believe hold an "L" shaped rubber weather strip that prevents rain water from flowing down into the door. The weather strip might also "squeegee" the water from the window glass as it moves up and down. These also came with the '34 window frame tracks and I think the reason there are two pieces is to accommodate the vent window mechanism in '34 convertible models. A '33 convertible would be one continuous strip? Hopefully someone with an original door intact can shed some light on this.

Other progress to report is that the engine has been made ready for the engine rebuilder. I will be delivering this next week. I see where Kanter's has complete rebuilding kits for these cars, bearings, valves, pistons, etc. I have heard good things about Kanter's and would like your feed back as well. Please let me know.

Chris

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Here is a photo of the Engine placed on an "EZ Run Cart" that makes it easy to move around.

I have been having a tough time removing the water pump. The photo shows the pump. It is attached with three nuts on the bottom that are threaded onto three studs. The passenger side and center are loose. I can see day light between the pump housing and the front of the block. The pump housing is frozen to the stud on the driver side which you can see in the close up. I have used PB Blaster and WD 40. No help. I have hammered on this with a flat ended punch until I felt I would do damage in continuing. I have applied heat but maybe not enough. I do not think this is a unique problem and that it may be problematic with early Plymouths. Any experience and advice before I really heat it up and use a hammer chisel with a blunt chisel to force it off the stud????

1933PlymouthPDEnginea.jpg

1933PlymouthPDWaterPumpDetaila.jpg

Easy Run is the name of the cart and you can find them on eBay or direct by searching for it.

Chris

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...I have been having a tough time removing the water pump. The photo shows the pump. It is attached with three nuts on the bottom that are threaded onto three studs. The passenger side and center are loose. I can see day light between the pump housing and the front of the block. The pump housing is frozen to the stud on the driver side which you can see in the close up. I have used PB Blaster and WD 40. No help. I have hammered on this with a flat ended punch until I felt I would do damage in continuing. I have applied heat but maybe not enough. I do not think this is a unique problem and that it may be problematic with early Plymouths. Any experience and advice before I really heat it up and use a hammer chisel with a blunt chisel to force it off the stud????

I don't recall anything special about that water pump mounting stud. You can easily replace it if you get it out damaged. But be careful of the water pump housing: The insides are pretty common and they can be rebuilt but the casting is unique to '33 and '34 so you don't want to break that.

Can you just double nut that stud and unscrew it from the block? I believe it goes into the water jacket so it might be a bit rusted up on the threads but it could be worth a try.

Nice stand. Wish I knew about things like that when my motor was out of the frame for all those years.

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Hi Chris,

I don't know about Kanter's but they have been around for a long time. The engine in my car was rebuilt and runs great so did not mess with it. I have attached some pictures of a block which I pulled a pump from, there is a lot of surface area for adhesive. This block was rebuilt about 2003 and the pump still a very painful task to remove, I broke a stud. I would use a good amount of heat and take your time.post-69877-143142708935_thumb.jpg

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Erick and others,

For those with an intact 1933 PD Grille can you provide the dimensions as shown on drawing? I hope the drawing is legible.

1933PlymouthPDGrilleBracketDetails.jpg

The temperature gage is back and "The Temperature Gage Guy" did a very nice job. The turnaround was about 1 week.

IMG_1978.jpg

I sandblasted the lower side door window channels and the instrument cluster housing. I spray painted with dark grey primer.

IMG_1950.jpg

IMG_1948.jpg

Thanks, Chris

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Many thanks Erick!

It would not surprise me to learn that the window parts were galvanized. Mine looked like they could have been. I think for restoration purposes the paint will work fine. In a wet and humid area like Houston I think the paint will be better than galvanize.

Is the rubber channel available from a supplier that you Know?

The more you see good original cars the more you learn. Is that a round rubber bumper riveted to the front of the grille at the top?

On the window glass I was thinking of using black window setting tape and cut it flush with a razor blade. The little rubber bushings (anti rattle) on the metal rod will be replaced with a longer rubber hose like a vacuum line.

Thanks, Chris

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Hi Chris,

I am going to most likely get a close rubber channel from McMaster-carr. I will try an see If window bedding tape works and also use a piece of vacuum hose. The Grill has rubber bumper which are attached with split rivets so they will come off very easy. Erick

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  • 1 month later...

This is the cowl vent assembly. Envision it as though you are on the floorboard looking up at the bottom side of the cowl. As with a lot of parts on this car I had to find the handle from another car. I found the spring in my cars "miscellaneous box" as well the "L" shaped cam follower.

I discovered the little bracket to which this "L" bracket attaches with a clevis pin. Do I have the handle assembled correctly?

1933PlymouthPDVentDetaile.jpg

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1933PlymouthPDVentDetaild.jpg

Thanks, Chris

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This is the cowl vent assembly. Envision it as though you are on the floorboard looking up at the bottom side of the cowl. As with a lot of parts on this car I had to find the handle from another car. I found the spring in my cars "miscellaneous box" as well the "L" shaped cam follower.

I discovered the little bracket to which this "L" bracket attaches with a clevis pin. Do I have the handle assembled correctly?

Thanks, Chris

Looks like the same setup as on my two door. Except that it uses a compression spring between the "L" piece and the cowl rather than an extension spring. Hard to get photos under the dash, I hope this shows what I mean.

post-30650-143142797168_thumb.jpg

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  • 1 month later...

Some progress to report. The engine has been disassembled, hot tanked, and clean. The engine rebuilder, G&G Performance in Tomball TX, tell me that this is the first rebuild for this engine. I do not know how many miles were on it. The water jackets were full of rust, there was some ridge around the top of the cylinders. They were able to bore the cylinders .030 over.

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As many of you know the lifters on the 1933 are unique to this engine. G&G say they will re machine mine. I will order a engine rebuild kit from Kanters. It should arrive in January and than G&G will reassemble the engine. Than the engine will go to the paint shop and be installed in the frame. Once in frame the sheet metal can be painted and installed along with the top and upholstery. I'm optimistic!

Notice the pesky water pump has been removed. It took heat and penetrating oil to break down years of rust that had this stud frozen tight to the pump flange. I am hopeful the pump can be rebuilt as this is also unique to the 1933.The 1934 and up have a nice bypass that probably improved circulation.

Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays and Happy New Year to ya'll.

Chris

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. . .

As many of you know the lifters on the 1933 are unique to this engine. G&G say they will re machine mine. I will order a engine rebuild kit from Kanters. It should arrive in January and than G&G will reassemble the engine. Than the engine will go to the paint shop and be installed in the frame. Once in frame the sheet metal can be painted and installed along with the top and upholstery. I'm optimistic!

Notice the pesky water pump has been removed. It took heat and penetrating oil to break down years of rust that had this stud frozen tight to the pump flange. I am hopeful the pump can be rebuilt as this is also unique to the 1933. The 1934 and up have a nice bypass that probably improved circulation.

Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays and Happy New Year to ya'll.

Chris

"Lifters" meaning tappets? My parts book shows part 610628 for the standard size tappet for PC, PD, PE and PF so they are the same for '33 and '34.

According to my parts books, the 1934 PF had the same water pump as the 1933 PC and PD. PE had the bypass style thermostat with the top inlet to the pump but it mounts to the block the same as the PC, PD and PF.

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