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Paint colors for 1933 Plymouth PD Convertible Coupe


1935EB
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Is it known if the floor pan used on the PD came from earlier models where that cover had a purpose, just a thought. My reason for asking was that if you take a line between the 2 uprights that support the parcel shelf it comes over top of the cover, now I am assuming that the panel behind the seat that divides the cabin from the rumble seat fixes to those uprights as shown in the photo below of a PE.

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Hi Chris, Can you tell me who did your chrome work and If you don't mind how much the cost on the windshield parts? thank you, Erick

If/when you get around to plating the windshield frame, be sure that the hollow inside is properly rinsed and neutralized. I didn't and in a few years the frame rotted from the inside out. Fortunately you can get very good quality new frames from N/C Industries.

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Ply33,

We cleaned the inside of the top of the windshield frame and than poured primer paint down into it. In one of the photo's on page 9 of this thread you can just barely see the gray color inside the frame through the holes to mount the rearview mirror.

These parts are plated but our hands covered them with grime and smudges as we positioned them on the car for a test fit and for the upholsterer to begin fitting the top.

Erick,

I use Speed and Sport Chrome Platers of Houston to do this work.

The breakdown was as follows but prices will vary due to condition, pitting, broken parts etc.

Side Posts 2 x 262.00, 524.00 Total (includes repair of a crack)

Top Bar 225.00

Lower windshield frame 2 x 475.00, 950.00

Seal retainers 2 x 40.00, 80.00

Knobs 2 x 120.00, 240.00

Total about 2019.00

Craig and Kevin 713 921 1132 are my contacts.

They do an excellent job and are known in the area for their work with pot metal and the repair of pot metal.

I use the following criteria when looking at platers.

Proven quality by looking at other VCCA or AACA members cars

Do they break parts in the plating process?

Do they lose parts?

These folks at Speed and Sport have not lost or broken any of my Plymouth or Chevy parts. This is important especially for parts that are almost impossible to find.

They are probably more expensive than most but you tend to get what you pay for. You also know you will get your parts back.

As for platers in general the cost of this has gone through the roof as City, County, State and Federal environmental laws and regulations really impact this business.

As for your parts, they are now experienced with 1933 Plymouth Convertible parts.

Hope this is helpful,

Chris

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Dave,

Look closely at photo 2. You see a little metal strip that shows right above the tire. It is still connected with one bolt. This strip is about 3/4 inch wide and maybe 6-7 inches long. A piece of rubber is vulcanized to it and it rubs against the bottom of the transmission. That is called the "steady rest". And yes, it is a part that I need. I will send it off to the Antique Parts Cellar with my motor mounts to have the new rubber vulcanized to it. Send me a PM and we can discuss. Thanks!! Chris

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Hi Steve, is $20.00 for the three spring bumpers good? Erick

2 are in good usable shape the third may need new rubber,$25 plus shipping will do it. so if you want the toe board cover ( $15 ) and the 3 springs,

send Money order only for $55 that should cover shipping .

Thanks

Steve

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2 are in good usable shape the third may need new rubber,$25 plus shipping will do it. so if you want the toe board cover ( $15 ) and the 3 springs,

send Money order only for $55 that should cover shipping .

Thanks

Steve

Hi Steve, What is your address? I will take the 3 spring bumpers. Is the cover an original Plymouth? if so I will get that also. thank you Erick
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  • 2 weeks later...
Thanks for your patience. We had a very busy Thanksgiving Holiday, etc.

Work has begun on the interior or at least getting ready for the interior. The seat frame is from a 4 Door Sedan which is the same for coupes, 4 doors and the convertible. The Convertible has no separation between the back of the seat and the rumble area. The coupe does have a panel. On convertibles I have seen, not that many, there is no separation. If someone knows otherwise please add your comments, soon. The 1934 Plymouth and 1933 and 1934 Dodges are similar. The lower half of this seat back had carpet, the top half was upholstery. This convertible will have the leather trim which means dark brown vinyl on seat frame, front and back. Lower half of seat back carpet. Kick panels, door panels rumble area panels all dark brown vinyl. Rumble seat cushions dark brown vinyl. The front seat cushion and back rest is genuine leather. Package tray is covered in dark brown vinyl.

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The seat tracks need to be sandblasted, disassembled, and soaked in penetrating oil to get them to work. These get bolted to the floorboard. You can see where the seat adjusting handle is broken off. I have seen this to be the case on a lot of cars and I think it was a design weakness. I have nickel plated the other part of the adjusting handle and will reattach it by using a splint that will be unnoticeable and make it stronger.

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I will post more seat frame pictures including the original before cleaning up and painting as time allows.

Chris

Chris

I am trying to remember which way the tapered seat riser faces ( wood shim ) under tracks, tapered down to front?

Thanks

Steve

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  • 2 weeks later...

Some progress being made. The guy's at Old Parts Cellar (Then and Now Automotive) did a great job on the parts that needed rubber vulcanized to them. Their service was excellent. I gave them a week before checking to see if they had received the parts and when I phoned they had the parts ready to go and were waiting on me to give them a credit card to charge. Can anyone tell me which direction is front on the rear axle bumpers? Even the motor mounts are marked with which direction is front.

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Steve has done his best to restore the gas tank apron which was in pretty poor shape as most are. He has done well with it. The cowl is now black as was noted earlier in the thread.

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Progress has started on the rag top. Initial fitting is taking place. Steve wants this top finished before he applies the color coat on the car as he does not want to deal with scratches and dings caused by fitting one.

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It is interesting to note the differences between convertibles of the time period. The Chrysler products did not use anything more than canvas to keep water from flowing up and over the top of the side windows. This is in contrast to my Chevrolet Cabriolets which have a metal bar with a weather seal on it. I think the chevy was a little more water tight (maybe). I show a picture of a friends 1933 Chevy side seal assembly. I believe Chevy owners removed these bars in good weather and left them off until cold weather arrived. This also explains why many of these are lost and missing on these cars.

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It took a bit of explaining and a visit to AACA Club Member John Doerfler's nice 1933 Plymouth Convertible to show the upholstery man how this all fits. Keen's great pictures earlier in the thread shows this as well and was helpful to the upholstery man.

Thanks, Chris

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​Chris provided I'm looking at the correct part it's a bit of a toughie, there is hardly any difference, what I did notice was that the outside edge had more angle to the side and the corner rad was slightly bigger. In the photos I took the right hand side bumper off to get a better look, the blue end is the front.

post-72422-143142468059_thumb.jpg ​Sorry about the quality of the pics,

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​Chris provided I'm looking at the correct part it's a bit of a toughie, there is hardly any difference, what I did notice was that the outside edge had more angle to the side and the corner rad was slightly bigger. In the photos I took the right hand side bumper off to get a better look, the blue end is the front.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]243097[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]243098[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]243099[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]243100[/ATTACH] Sorry about the quality of the pics,

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Hi Tom,

The ones you are showing are the rears. I meant to ask about the other ones that are for the front. I had them mixed up. None of mine had any rubber on them and if I had not looked at the Then and Now website I would not have known they existed other than the metal plates. I have come to discover that everything has a purpose and to not ignore things like this. Your bumpers look in great shape for age of them.

Chris

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Happy Easter to all. We give thanks for all God's blessings.

Tom thanks for showing the orientation of the rubber bumpers.

Steve finished most of the work on the front of the package tray. A few more welds and also the fabrication of the top iron rests comes next. The new part will be welded into place on top of the package tray.

This red one is what it should look like (photo from Scott B.).

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This is how my new one turned out. It is made from subassemblies that are welded together. You can find earlier photos of these in earlier postings.

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Thanks for looking, Chris

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That new upstand piece is looking good, will that be spot welded in position? On the red body is that the 2 trim pieces that go over the rear valance and wing (fender) joint, that I spied closes to the camera.

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Tom--I'm back after a hiatus with too much work going on to have time for my Plymouths. Yes, what you see in the photo of the red convertible are the rear splash apron to fender seam covers. Keep in mind that the red one is a 34, not a 33, however I believe they are identical in that area of the body. If you need some photos of the rear seam covers, which are two piece, let me know and I will send.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Bump for Scott.

Chris any idea what these treaded holes are for 1/4" unified 4 off

Thanks

On the L.H.D. cars, they hold the bracket that holds the throttle control rod in place. Pedal attaches to one lever on the rod, another lever off it runs the throttle linkage to the carburetor and a third lever attaches to the control for the automatic clutch. It is setup so that the starter actuating pedal linkage will press against it to slightly open the throttle when you actuate the starter. I think the R.H.D. cars have a similar part but setup so that the pedal lever is on the other side of the car.

P.S. Firewall should be black regardless of body color but I did not know that when I was fixing the car up.

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Thanks Tod, your office is never closed. If I'm seeing correctly the throttle rod passes over the top of the gear box where on a RHD the linkage to the carburettor is much simpler being that the pedal is on that side. The colour of the paint don't matter, the metal doesn't mind.

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Thanks Tod, your office is never closed. If I'm seeing correctly the throttle rod passes over the top of the gear box where on a RHD the linkage to the carburettor is much simpler being that the pedal is on that side. The colour of the paint don't matter, the metal doesn't mind.

They might still have had that rod arrangement on the R.H.D. cars to allow for controlling the optional automatic clutch.

How does the starter pedal linkage work in a R.H.D. car? Do they just leave it way on over to the left? If so then the rod may also be there for opening the throttle slightly when the starter pedal is pushed.

edit: I see from the images you posted on the other thread that the starter pedal mounts in the same place as for L.H.D. but is bent toward the right side. Guessing that the R.H.D. car should probably have that throttle control rod too.

edit 2: Yep. Parts book shows part 613212 "Accelerator or throttle cross shaft assembly -- (R.H.D. Only)" for PCXX and PD models. Which is different than the one called out for "normal" cars (613204).

Edited by ply33 (see edit history)
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  • 3 weeks later...
Hi Steve, What is your address? I will take the 3 spring bumpers. Is the cover an original Plymouth? if so I will get that also. thank you Erick

Hi Eric can you tell me what part of the floor that plate you bought from me fit? had a 1/2 round end and the bend fit the floor board bend.

Thanks

Steve

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  • 1 month later...

Thanks for the kind words.

Dave the photos of the blue Dodge are very revealing. Note the Dodge convertibles have a chrome plated top iron set this I think is right for 33 and 34. For 33 Plymouth they are painted glossy black, for 34 Plymouth they list them as "white metal" what ever that is.

The photo showing where the top center bow is attached to the lock pillar shows a thin rubber pad that I never knew existed. This looks like it can be made from a rubber pad. Thanks again!!

Chris

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