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HOW DID YOU/ME, BECOME A BUICK SUPPORTER??


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Maybe this thread has been introduced, but maybe NOT.

I love to see the pictures of Buick's, and would love to hear your story too.

For me it was a NATURAL thing. I was born in Normal, Il, 1937. Dad was the grease monkey at the local Buick dealership. When I was about 4 he advanced into the service department, and loved working on all the straight eights.

Soon he was service manager, and with the approval of the then owner of the agency he would purchase a 1941 wrecked Buick, and bring it home to rebuild in our basement garage. I recall as if it was yesterday sitting and spend hours watching, and ASKING questions. No surprise there....

We always had a new Buick, so that in its self kept my interest. The dealership was right downtown, uptown to some, LOL. It was a cool brick building, two floors with a very neat car elevator. I'm sure it wouldn't pass inspection today, for sure.

The second floor was wood, it is where cars that needed lengthy repairs landed. I loved to take a creeper, run and flop like on a sled, and the sound over the wood floor was so neat.

In the early 40's Buick sent the dealership a complete rolling chassis, and the reason was to show off the GIANT X FRAME. I loved that piece, sat on the orange crate of a seat many times. By now you can see WHY I am a LOYAL Buick person. I was one of 4 boys, and the only one that has stuck with Buick.

Dad ended up as the dealer, then retired to Texas, and was sales manager for a very large dealer in Austin.

He died with Buick in his blood, he gave over 65 years of his life to Buick. He would say, IF YOU DON'T DRIVE A BUICK, WELL, YOU ARE THE SCUM OF THE EARTH, then laugh, but I'm not to sure he didn't believe such.

I have owned many a Buick, at present a 41 Limited, modified, and a stock 46 Roadmaster. Well I own a 46 scale parade piece too.

I like Dad, will die loving Buick's

What's your story?

Dale in Indy

Edited by smithbrother (see edit history)
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Love your story. My dad was a salesman for Kaiser on the west coast. When the '56s came out, I could not get the '56 Lincoln Continental out of my mind I tried to sketch it in a two seater, but could not match the styling even close. Then when the '57s came out the '57 Chevy including Corvette was my choice, followed by the T-bird and the Buick. All had to be convertibles. During my career, I have owned one of each (Excluding the Continental). Now I have a Roadmaster and a Super project.

Dan

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Edited by Caballero2 (see edit history)
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Even though I do not have a Buick at this time I still love Buick's. It's common knowledge that Harley Earl had a thing for Buick. It's no wonder some of the best body designs appear on Buick. That's why I'm a Buick lover.

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I have some of this out there on a few other posts but......

My Buick love interest/obsession came when Dad found a 58 Buick Limited 2 door that a young fellow wanted to sell and Dad needed a car to drive back and fourth to work 60 miles each way daily back in 1968. At the age of 15 after helping him wash & wax this chrome beast for about two years (even though it was a well worn car), I was with him on December 24th and about three blocks from home when the rear universal joint broke! He walked home to get his 64 Olds and a rope, told me to steer the Buick behind him and we parked it on the front lawn of our house!

That spring I was 16 and time to get my license and..... tells me I cannot buy that 37 Chev with the 283 that a guy from school is selling! Instead, he & I will change out that U-joint together, fix the exhaust (my cost) and I can have the Limited. I'm now INDEPENDENT, ya hooo!

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About a year later, I get a call from a fellow Car Club member of Dad's that asks if I might be interested in a 58 Buick convertible? One look at a red Buick convert and..... done deal! This is while I was in high school but working stead weekends and one night a week so money seemed to be no object then....

Dated my wife in this car before putting it away in storage after buying a house in 1980....

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Then....

I see an ad in Old Autos for a 58 Buick Roadmaster convert and Dad & I take a road trip. It wasn't something that would be on the road immediately but the bug had taken a hold!

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Then...

There is another ad in Old Autos about a 1958 Buick Limited 2 door not really far away... (the wife is now starting to question my sanity). Drove it up on the trailer but had trany issues (typical). It was however, identical in colour, options and interior to my other Limited which by now had almost 160,000 miles on it and this one only showed 54,000 so.... "You know dear, it just makes sense to get this car and I will have extra parts to make it a really nice one, right?"

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I'm still married to that same girl (she is a keeper) after 34 years and....

still have those Buick's too!

YES, I'M A BUICK SUPPORTER! (but there is an agreed hold on any more..... for now?)

Doug

BCA# 35039

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Great stories. I love these kinds of threads. I may have posted this before but what the heck, here's my story.

My Dad had a succession of Buicks that I can remember. A 50 Special jetback, a 55 Special 4 dr stick shift, and then he got my eldest sister a 53 special 2 dr hardtop ( stick shift) for college. He drove used cars all the time till in late 60 he bought a new Olds 98.

My two brothers were gaga for that Olds. And it was a torque monster with the 394. Dad used to take our family of 8 to the ice cream store on Saturdays and always lit up the tires at one secluded intersection. I distinctly remember looking behind us once however, and thinking I could not tell the difference between the smoke from the tire and the burnt oil from the rings. At this same time my Aunt was returning the 55 Special as she felt she could no longer drive.

So my two brothers raised novenas to that Olds and I took to the lonely old Special in the driveway. Taught myself how to drive the stick shift two years before I had my license. I grew to want that car! My older brother got his license first naturally and Dad relegated him to the Special. Andy beat the crap out of that Special, and when the clutch went Dad had had enough. He sold it a scant few weeks before I got my learners permit even though I begged him for that car.

I had my permit about a week and passed my road test and then a week later dad brings home a 65 Electra custom. It was never in my name but it became my car. Dad would even ask me before he took it out. I polised that thing to the nth degree and drove it all over. Dad also replaced the 60 Olds with a 66 Dynamic 88. A 425 w/ 2 bbl that could burn rubber forever, and my brother proved it. But the olds never generated a spark for me. That Electra set the hook and with few exceptions I 've had lots of Buicks ever since....

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I grew up with oldsmobile and buick cars, my mom drove a 1979 2 door delta88 all the way up to 2005. So I spent my whole childhood riding around in the comfort of crushed velvet velore. I loved that car but it was too rusty and used up by the time I got around to driving age. My grandparents and aunt always had Buicks. When I turned 16 I got my grandparents 1994 Lesaber Custom. I drove that car until the transmission gave out(young male driver abuse). I loved how that car floated down the road. I met my girlfriend in that car and now we have a wonderful 4 month old son and have been together 4 years. That car had power, got great gas mileage and fit me and 5 people comfortably for road trips. Buick is a name that will forever be a part of me and I love them. The least I can do is redo my 47 special. Buick is my brand!

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I have always loved many different brands of cars. My Dad had bought a slightly used 1967 Buick Special with factory trim that made it look like a Skylark. It had a V-6 and a stick shift. That was a great car. I graduated high school in 1982 and got a job working at a place that sold and repair collectible cars. In the yard was a 1953 Buick that had been brought in for brake work. The owner couldn't pay for the work and the car sat there for years and eventually turned it over to the shop owner. He then wanted it out of the yard and asked all the employees if anyone wanted to buy it so he didn't have to scrap it. I offered him $ 500 for it on the condition that it ran. One of the mechanics got it running for me. I didn't know anything about the car, so I made a call to a friend who was working for an old time mechanic that knew a lot about old cars. I said to my friend, the car is a 1953 Buick but I don't know what model it is. I don't know if it is top of the line or a cheap model, but it has four portholes on each fender. I know that the more portholes a Buick has, the better the model and since this car has four portholes it must be a pretty good one. Better than having only one or two. When he called back he told me that our friend said that if it has four portholes and runs, for $ 500 Buy It ! So I bought it. Upon my next trip to Carlisle, I bought literature and some parts. Shortly after, I was at a local auto store to buy a front brake rotor for my 1970 Mercury Cyclone GT daily driver. The store owner asked me about the Buick hat I was wearing. So I told him about my ' 53 Roadmaster 2 dr. hardtop. He asked if I belonged to the local Buick club. I said no. He said he was a member and that all club members get a discount at his store, and if I promised to come to the next club meeting and join, he would give me a discount right then and there. I agreed, and went to the next meeting and joined, and then found out that I had to join the BCA too. So I learned a lot more about my Buick, and many others too.

Then in the early 1990s a very good friend, whom I had met from the local BCA chapter, bought a 1940 Buick Limited model 81. He got it from an estate sale. I got to drive it a few times and fell in love with it. When he decided to sell it, he gave me the first chance to buy it, and I jumped on it !

The '40 is my current driving old car. I still have my ' 53 that is waiting to be put on the road again, and I still have my '70 Cyclone which is waiting to be restored.

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As I teenager I was never impressed with Buicks. My high school hot rod was a '50 Olds and straight eight Buicks simply wern't popular with So CA teenagers. That was until 1954 when the new Century certainly got our attention. Of course not many teenagers were driving new Centuries.

I had always been a car buff since the age of two when I'm told I could identify the different makes. Years later, in 1972 I felt I was finally able to justify buying a vintage car. The wife was supportive if not enthusiastic as long as it was a station wagon she could occasionally drive. I went along with the wagon idea but it had to be a woodie since I grew up surfing in So Ca. We looked at a Plymouth and several Ford and Mercury woodies but all were in such bad shape I passed. We then found a low mileage '47 Buick Estate Wagon that we actually drove home. It was complete and we could start enjoying it immediately. I used to collect brochures so I knew Buick woodies existed but I had never actually seen one. It wasn't a cute little surfer wagon but it had class! The wife drove it about three times before demanding a new Volvo wagon so the Buick became a weekend hobby car.

Forty-one years later we still have the Buick. My children are now in their 40's and remember most of their childhood riding in the Buick. It now has a 120,000 original miles. We put on over 2000 miles last year attending car shows. We joined the BCA in 1972 and the national Woodie Club in 1976 and are still active. I'm amazed at how well built the Buick is. A 390 rear end makes for comfortable cruising at freeway speeds. It still amazes me that a bone stock 66 year old car continues to perform as well as it does. It's undergone several cosmetic restorations and could use a new paint job. We are currently rebuilding an engine to replace the factory rebuilt which the original owner had installed in 1960. Several vintage cars have come and gone through the years but the Buick has definitely been a keeper. I don't have much faith in advertising slogans but Buick's slogan years ago "When Better Cars Are Built, Buick Will Build Them" certainly proved to be true. We bought a couple of new Buicks in the '80's but sadly by then the old slogan simply wasn't true.

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Strangest thing! Being an Old Farmboy, one day I was walking acrossed the field and slip in some manure what a big time cattle dealer drove over with a Buick. That Buick that drove over it must have left some Buick Seeds in the pile of fertilzer cuz the next thing you know it dun started to grow. I went down to the pasture purty near every day watchin what was growing in the well fertlized patch and I could see that sumtin big was happening. I told my Pa bout it. I said, "Pa, I do believe I see'd a Buick seed that has taken root out in the middle of the 20 acre grazin lot." He said, "Son you better go fence it in aforn the cows go in an trample it to death, or worse yet, eats it." So I took the old Ally Cat tractor what had a loader and filled it full of fence posts n wire and put up a fence round that there spot. That thing was a growin in a growin like a weed and the weeds was over taken it. Bout two moons later it done out growed the fence and I had to make it a little more sizable. Back for the Ally Cat. More posts, more wire, fencin plyers, hammer, wire staples, crow bar, -n- fence streacher. Now by the end of the Growing season them weeds was taller in the tallest Buick ever built. The forth full moon of the growing season was nighon into Fall and Pa said, "Son, it's time to harvest." So I gets me back on the Ally Cat with a loggin chain -n- cuttin plyers and heads down to weed patch where them Buick seeds was first sliped apon. I cuts the wire and pulls out the posts one by one with the mighty Ally Cat Diesel powered farmin tractor with the delux fully hydraulicated e-z controlled loader. Then I finally stomped down them powerfull big weeds round about and there she sat gleaming in the Sun the mostest Bea-u-ti-ful thing what I ever did see. My eyes welled up with joy just like when ma put me to cuttin up onions. My throat got all choked up like bein overcome with a wiff of smoke from the wood stove. I was ner speachless. What was intoduced to the world that day was the most Famous Buick of all, The Chartruce Lady. It was love at first sight.

Another slightly Twisted Tale by Dandy Dave! ;)

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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Like many of us with old cars, my father “infected” me with this great hobby. During my teen years, he helped me work on my first cars and I got my first taste of working on old cars when I helped him restore a 1927 Chevrolet. Many years later, during his recovery from quadruple by-pass heart surgery in 1985, he bought a blue/black 1913 model ‘31 Buick. This was the car featured several years earlier in the center color portfolio of the book “THE BUICK A Complete History” which listed Tom Hinsch as the owner. Since this model Buick could not easily be fitted with an electric starter, my father needed a “starter/driver” to help him enjoy his new old car while he fully recovered. After he taught me how to start, drive and maintain that Buick, I was hooked!

Everyone in our family got to go touring with Ma & Pa Shaw in the car that became known simply as “The Thirteen”. My parents joined and toured with the Horseless Carriage Club of America (HCCA), and I had the chance to tour with them and observe other brass era cars with T-head & L-head engines. I soon gained an appreciation for Buick valve-in-head engines and also learned that Buick had engineered some elegantly robust cars. We have continued to tour only in Buicks ever since!

Touring with “The Thirteen” for several years had taken its’ toll on the older restoration. So my son and friends helped me remove and strip down the body to bare wood for it’s’ (second) restoration & repaint just in time for my daughter’s wedding in August 1999. We didn’t restore it to be a show car, but as a historically correct and reliable touring car for my parents to enjoy in their retirement. About five years later, when my father could no longer comfortably maintain & drive “The Thirteen”, it came from Santa Cruz, California to reside with the next generation of our my family in Vancouver, Washington.

1913 had many firsts for Buick. “The Thirteen” is a “nickel car”. All its brass trim pieces are nickel plated. It is believed that nickel plated brass cars became popular because they didn’t require never ending polishing to keep the brass lights and accessories bright and shiny. “The Thirteen” also came equipped with electric headlights, combination oil /electric side & tail lamps, and a Vesta Magneto Generator to keep the battery charged and all the lights working. “The Thirteen” also has a Prest-O-Lite tank to run the DIVCO Automatic Starting System. Yes, Buick had automatic starting in 1913! I understand this was the only automatic starting system offered By Buick in 1913 because the electric starter-generator had not yet been perfected to the satisfaction of Buick engineers.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it....

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I infected myself with the mechanical workings of cars. There was no one in my family much interested in how they worked. Anyway, my first car at the age of 17 was a 78 Buick Regal. However, our family always had a Buick. Estate Wagons(family of seven). Later on Regals. We even had three Buick Opel(Izuzu version). The infection really set in with my 54. Just beautiful and different from other cars of the era.

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Great, great stories. FOR SURE!

Dandy Dave, YOU ARE A DANDY......LOL Only a Mother would love a guy like you, hehehe.

Can't wait to read the next story.

Dale in Indy

I guess it is OK if I laugh at myself as long as everyone is Laughing with me ...:o So, I suppose now all y'all. want to hear the untwisted version. :D Dandy Dave!

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No, No Power Block in my 1937 BO Orchard Tractor. My BO still has the original Fairbanks-Morse mag, An original cork float in the Carbuetor, and a washable brass oil filter as equiped from the factory. The tractor is on Iron. Back later to untwist the Buick Tale. ;) Dandy Dave!

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Dandy Dave has B O !...snicker snicker snicker :D

Yep, Been accused of that after a hard days work a time or two. :o Been poked fun of about that John Deere tractor a time or two also. B is the model. O is for Orchard. Actually these are a rare model and are highly prized by John Deere Collectors. Dandy Dave!

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I just can't resist sillyness sometimes or a play on words.

I resemble that remark... Ahhhh, wize guy eh...Poke, poke. Nuk nuk nuk. It's OK as long as you laugh with me. :P

I'm working on a 1980 FIAT Spider with a customer at the moment. His claim to fame is his Daughter inlaw is a great grand niece to none other than, The Three Stooges. Dandy Dave!

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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.....I said to my friend, the car is a 1953 Buick but I don't know what model it is. I don't know if it is top of the line or a cheap model, but it has four portholes on each fender. I know that the more portholes a Buick has, the better the model and since this car has four portholes it must be a pretty good one. Better than having only one or two.....

How about NO portholes? Just saying that your statement in red is not 100% correct when referring to 1953 and 1954 Buick's.

Al Malachowski

BCA #8965

"500 Miles West of Flint"

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Al, I suppose you're referring to the Skylarks. At the time, I didn't know anything about the 53 - 54 Skylarks. I thought Skylarks only had come out in the 60's. I had a pretty good knowledge of old cars at the time, but still had a lot to learn. But I was just out of high school and my old car knowledge was far beyond most kids my age. So I knew a little bit about Buicks and liked them. I know better now. :)

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