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Has anyone ever powder coated a set of wire wheels? I'm trying to decide on paint or powder coat for the (welded) wire wheels on my 1932 Dodge DL. I was wondering if the powder coat could get into all the nooks and crannies that a wire wheel would have. I've often heard that sometimes it's hard to get complete coverage in objects with deep recesses and odd angles. The car will be a driver, not a show car, so I'm looking for looks and durability. Thanks for any advice or suggestions.

RT

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Powder coating is applied much like paint, if the applicator cannot get his material into all the little nooks and crannies than you may have a problem. Fortunately the powder is just that, powder and so unlike paint it is a much finer particle that is being applied and the material is actually drawn onto the surface unlike paint.

In truth paint is drawn onto a surface as well through a static charge but nothing compared to the powder coating.

I have never powder coated a set of wire wheels but I would not have it any other way were it my wires. The durability and maintenance cannot be beat, cleanliness is the key factor for the coating.

Edited by 1930 (see edit history)
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Seems like my post went away from the Technical forum so.....

The wire wheels on my '31 DB were powdercoated by the previous owner of the car. He worked at a powdercoating shop. The coating came out beautifully and it covered all of the worrisome areas. The only issue that I had was getting a flat tire every day. It took a week to find the culprit. Turns out that when the guy did the work, he wrapped a wire around the only place he could to suspend the wheels...the inner rim. I finally figured out that when he coated the wheel and the suspension wire, it bonded the wire to the wheel. When he detached the wire, it left a jagged edge all around the inner rim. It ended up poking holes in the inner tube liner and inner tube. I simply filed the jagged edge down all around the wheel and never any troubles with them again. The little bit of rust you see on the wheel is from the rusty inner hubcap base. I thought your car would have come with adjustable wire wheels, not welded. Got a photo of one?

post-37352-143141749026_thumb.jpg

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Hi,

For my two cents worth...I'm with Jason and agree its in the preparation. Have the rims rounded and balanced before any work is done on them. Have them blasted ( get someone who does a lot of small car parts and when they are done have them etch primed. This will give a good base for the powder coating and should come up looking good. Powder Coating is a little duller than the finish given from painting but if that dosn't worry you then go for it provided they have the colour you want.

Ian

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Hi,

For my two cents worth...I'm with Jason and agree its in the preparation. Have the rims rounded and balanced before any work is done on them. Have them blasted ( get someone who does a lot of small car parts and when they are done have them etch primed. This will give a good base for the powder coating and should come up looking good. Powder Coating is a little duller than the finish given from painting but if that dosn't worry you then go for it provided they have the colour you want.

Ian

Ian, I had no idea that you could use etch as a base, I have always been under the impression that the metal had to be perfectly bare and clean including any traces of oil from fingers, thats why I have always worn gloves when I have done that sort of work.

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[ATTACH=CONFIG]177909[/ATTACH]We are having a pair of wheels coated as we speak, I will not see them for a couple of weeks however as my partner took them home to Seattle to have them done.

Since we are only doing these wheels for an appearance sake as the car has dual side mounts we are going to clean up a couple of tires and stick them on there just to look at. Let me ask this, How can I put the retaining rings on without damaging the finish? These were a bear to get off with a couple of pry bars. Will a porta power with that little finger attachment work?

My partner tells me that they have a silver that wont quite be chrome, but close enough for a butcherd up project like this.

Edited by JACK M (see edit history)
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Hi Jason,

My chassis, running board brackets, cross members were all etch primed prior to powdercoating.

I don't know their exact process though to give a full explanation.

I had to have all body panel to bare metal prior to a two pack epoxy primer being put on.

Ian

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Hi Jason,

My chassis, running board brackets, cross members were all etch primed prior to powdercoating.

I don't know their exact process though to give a full explanation.

I had to have all body panel to bare metal prior to a two pack epoxy primer being put on.

Ian

I may be wrong Ian but I believe you etch primed them just to stop any flash rusting and they were prob. once again stripped prior to the powder coating but if you are able will you confirm that with whomever did your coatings, the heat needed to bake the coating onto the wheel is greater than any etching primer I am aware of will tolerate but always trying to learn something new, thanks

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[ATTACH=CONFIG]177909[/ATTACH]We are having a pair of wheels coated as we speak, I will not see them for a couple of weeks however as my partner took them home to Seattle to have them done.

Since we are only doing these wheels for an appearance sake as the car has dual side mounts we are going to clean up a couple of tires and stick them on there just to look at. Let me ask this, How can I put the retaining rings on without damaging the finish? These were a bear to get off with a couple of pry bars. Will a porta power with that little finger attachment work?

My partner tells me that they have a silver that wont quite be chrome, but close enough for a butcherd up project like this.

You might try wrapping the rim in a heavy trash/leaf bag and then slide the ring over it. Then just pull out the plastic and fill tire with air. I have seen that done.

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I know/have heard that there is a new filling primer that can be used prior to powder coating, I do not know if it is sandable, I have never used it nor seen a can of it, I am sure that is specifically engineered for the P.C process.

Eastwood carries a nice little inexpensive powder coating kit.

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