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Should I get a 60's-70's car as daily driver?


RedVac
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Guest GrabberOrangeBullit
Instead of getting a decently collectible car like a barracuda, you might wanna go for something less desirable, like a 4 door sedan, thats what I did.

"Less desirable" is car folk talk/code for way less money (wink, wink). But truthfully, knowing that he's in his 20's...I can sure as heck say that I didn't want any part of driving a 4-door car when I was our originating poster's age.

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Guest GrabberOrangeBullit
i drove my '68 impala wagon from Ventura (west of LA) to kingman AZ two weeks ago (350 miles) and got 15 mpg. bad thing I also used 7 quarts of oil. a gasket needs to be replaced under the intake manifold.

Readying for a replacement gasket session ourselves to lessen the oil loss...multiple gaskets arrived in the mail this week. Just need to wait for a three day weekend to get all the gasket work done (since the car us used daily, got to have her up and running during the week.) As for consumption, I guess it is what it is. We travel with a quart of oil (among the fuses, tool, gloves, wire, jumper, test light, electrical tape, ohm meter etc.)

What size engine does that wagon run? 15mpg seems pretty darn good when considering most larger body, pre 74' V-8's.

Edited by GrabberOrangeBullit (see edit history)
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Very well put, marlin65--I agree.

Be careful with that Corvair, by the way. Best not to try taking any corners with it!

(I have the same "issues" with my swing-axle VWs!)

Absolutely nothing wrong with a swing axle car. If your inclined to take a car way beyond sanity you can make one handle just as good as anything. This particular 200+ mph grand prix car designed by Porsche is where VW and Porsche's get their's (along with torsion bars) from. http://www.motorstown.com/images/auto-union-type-01.jpg

When traction becomes a problem in the thirties and because of tire technology of the time you just make it a dually!

http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6061/6072754910_6de2470d00_z.jpg

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You guys are not listening to RedVac are you? Lets start again, he says;

I've been thinking about getting a late 60's-early 70's muscle car as a daily driver. :rolleyes: I look at the cars I could replace my aging Geo Prizm with, something modern and cheap, or even modern and expensive, but I keep going back to this idea of a classic car. I want something with style, and frankly all the newer cars I see just don't do it for me. I'd rather save the money than spend it on an invisible car. When I love something, I can often put up with impracticality, but to a degree of course.

A 1974 Cutlass is not a muscle car. In fact NO Cutlass is a muscle car...Not even a 442 after 1972 is! Regardless of that the 1974 Cutlass and it's 350 after three years of compression reduction and camshaft smog revisions and much lower numeric axle ratios is pretty anemic.

RedVac goes on to say this;

One thing I'm sure of is that I'll have money in the future (say 10 years from now) to set up a personal garage and get a classic car. I'm a bit bummed because I wanted something I could "grow up with" and work on throughout these years, you know, develop a bond with a car, but I think it's wiser to put that aside for now. Along with packing light I also value anonymity and a Geo Prizm provides that in spades. I don't see any point in going halfway, I'm an all-or-nothing kind of person. Better to focus on career and get the money faster so I can drive that MoPar sooner, less distractions that way, more freedom on the other side. ;)

Perhaps I'll fix up the Prizm, for the heck of it. :confused:

But everyone goes on and on when RedVac is done!

Edited by helfen (see edit history)
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Guest GrabberOrangeBullit
You guys are not listening to RedVac are you? ...A 1974 Cutlass is not a muscle car. In fact NO Cutlass is a muscle car...Not even a 442 after 1972 is! Regardless of that the 1974 Cutlass and it's 350 after three years of compression reduction and camshaft smog revisions and much lower numeric axle ratios is pretty anemic.

Neither is a Covair for that matter. I think, however, that folks are trying to offer up some ideas/alternatives for an admitted newbie to perhaps think about. Ultimiately, is it not best to avoid biting off more than one can chew (in the way of time, money and repair experience that is) and work one's way up and make some expected mistakes on something that is not a dwindling commodity?

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Neither is a Covair for that matter. I think, however, that folks are trying to offer up some ideas/alternatives for an admitted newbie to perhaps think about. Ultimiately, is it not best to avoid biting off more than one can chew (in the way of time, money and repair experience that is) and work one's way up and make some expected mistakes on something that is not a dwindling commodity?

You missed the part where RedVac says this;

One thing I'm sure of is that I'll have money in the future (say 10 years from now) to set up a personal garage and get a classic car. I'm a bit bummed because I wanted something I could "grow up with" and work on throughout these years, you know, develop a bond with a car, but I think it's wiser to put that aside for now.

His thoughts aren't any clearer than this;

I think it's wiser to put that aside for now.

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Absolutely nothing wrong with a swing axle car. If your inclined to take a car way beyond sanity...

Nah, helfen, that was just a wisecrack on my part. I am very much of a "low impact" type old-VW driver! Though I did add a "camber compensator" to my '60 Bug.

Once several years back I hit a downhill s-curve exit ramp (with little to no "slow down" lane) off of our belved Merritt Parkway here in CT, in my '50 Bug (w/o any sort of camber compensator), and I got that "odd sensation," which thankfully never turned into anything worse than a sensation!

Looks like vintage Spitfire drivers also had similar opportunities for cornering excitement:

post-34222-143141750145_thumb.jpg

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Steve I remember that Spitfire picture from one of my old Triumph books, each wheel, it seems wants to follow its own path! :D:D

The Spit was bad, but the Mark 1 GT6 with roughly the same chassis & swing axles and 50% more horsepower (+double the tourque) in a package more routinely raced than almsot any other car....now that was a scary ride!!!:eek:

post-30638-143141750687_thumb.jpg

post-30638-143141750683_thumb.jpg

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I am trying to track down a spectacular vintage photo of a stock swing axle VW Beetle cornering with gusto. From what I recall, it makes that Spitfire photo look comparatively tame.

EDIT: Just found it--turns out it is a scan of a printed picture (from a book) that someone sent me. Now that I look at it, I am not sure if this looks better or worse than the Spitfire picture--but either way, I'm sure it was a memorable ride...

post-34222-143141750946_thumb.jpg

FURTHER EDIT: Big tail lights and small license plate light suggest this was either a '62 or '63 Bug...

Edited by stock_steve
Add picture and a few additional descriptive details... (see edit history)
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You guys are not listening to RedVac are you? Lets start again, he says;

I've been thinking about getting a late 60's-early 70's muscle car as a daily driver. :rolleyes: I look at the cars I could replace my aging Geo Prizm with, something modern and cheap, or even modern and expensive, but I keep going back to this idea of a classic car. I want something with style, and frankly all the newer cars I see just don't do it for me. I'd rather save the money than spend it on an invisible car. When I love something, I can often put up with impracticality, but to a degree of course.

A 1974 Cutlass is not a muscle car. In fact NO Cutlass is a muscle car...Not even a 442 after 1972 is! Regardless of that the 1974 Cutlass and it's 350 after three years of compression reduction and camshaft smog revisions and much lower numeric axle ratios is pretty anemic.

RedVac goes on to say this;

One thing I'm sure of is that I'll have money in the future (say 10 years from now) to set up a personal garage and get a classic car. I'm a bit bummed because I wanted something I could "grow up with" and work on throughout these years, you know, develop a bond with a car, but I think it's wiser to put that aside for now. Along with packing light I also value anonymity and a Geo Prizm provides that in spades. I don't see any point in going halfway, I'm an all-or-nothing kind of person. Better to focus on career and get the money faster so I can drive that MoPar sooner, less distractions that way, more freedom on the other side. ;)

Perhaps I'll fix up the Prizm, for the heck of it. :confused:

But everyone goes on and on when RedVac is done!

Ditto! .............I can't believe a simple thread like this went on & on for more than a hundred posts! :eek::eek:

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True, and my guess is RedVac has left the building, but hopefully the info helped him and when the time is right he jumps into the hobby.

OTOH I think the thread is alive due to some of the interesting offshoots it spawned - i.e. is a collectible or quasi collectible car ever a good idea for a DD, what would be an interesting ride for a younger/budget minded collector, what is a "musclecar" and some of the technical fine points of Corvair/VW/TR suspensions...

All good. As much as I love them I have limited time for forums and do not read every thread, if something looks like it is interesting I have a look, otherwise, I skip over the majority - assuming most do the same, what is the harm in keeping one running as long as their is interest?

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Sorry for my contributions to making this thread veer off course. But like Steve Mack said, there were some fun tid bits of various sorts that turned up along the way in the tangential discussions, and I definitely learned a few things along the way. I also forced myself to track down that swing axle VW Bug cornering photo, which I had been tearing my hair out for about two days looking for...

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Sorry for my contributions to making this thread veer off course. But like Steve Mack said, there were some fun tid bits of various sorts that turned up along the way in the tangential discussions, and I definitely learned a few things along the way. I also forced myself to track down that swing axle VW Bug cornering photo, which I had been tearing my hair out for about two days looking for...

Why not start a new thread. I'm up for that.

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RedVac,

Well maybe no one has hit upon a solution yet, but I did run across this car ad in the Feb 8th Crazy Mickey's Auto Chaser %:

"1970 Dodge Dart Swinger, 340-4 Speed"

--photo shows blue hardtop w/ white roof, 2 hood scoops--

page 4, ad from Northern Chrysler in Cutbank, MT PH: 1-800-800-2299

Not my car. No prices listed on the 30 cars in ad. Don't know exactly how many miles you are from Cutbank!

On paper, this sounds exactly what you're looking for..............but something this nice might get pretty shabby after 5 or 10 years driving around Los Angeles.

% No, I'm not making this up.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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Guest GrabberOrangeBullit

Jeff a

YES YES YES...86 those after market center lines and THE DART SWINGER is an ideal daily ride. Big enough engine to get you out and into traffic merge with ease, small enough not to completely torch a hole in the gas budget. Factory hood scoops give itjust enough of a mean edge as to differentiate this from grandmas Dart for sure. GREAT shape, and at 10k, leaves money for reserve for anything you might need to repair/replace (if me, first to go are the rims and steering wheel in favor of stock wheel and Dodge rally rims.) Ya struck gold with this listing. It's a smaller car, thus won't experience issues with compact parking spaces and garages in the City.

Of course, being a Mopar girl I am biased...but still think this will fit the bill nicely.

All that said, I would take this to a mechanic before commiting as it is clear that this car was rodded. Don't want to start off with an engine in need of overhaul, or tired transmission. If it does need work, I'd adjust the offer to buy accordingly.

Edited by GrabberOrangeBullit (see edit history)
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Not sure if this young man has cash or is financing, but take him at his word that his budget supports up to 20K.

Yes, take him at his word......and here it is........ again!

RedVac goes on to say this;

One thing I'm sure of is that I'll have money in the future (say 10 years from now) to set up a personal garage and get a classic car. I'm a bit bummed because I wanted something I could "grow up with" and work on throughout these years, you know, develop a bond with a car, but I think it's wiser to put that aside for now. Along with packing light I also value anonymity and a Geo Prizm provides that in spades. I don't see any point in going halfway, I'm an all-or-nothing kind of person. Better to focus on career and get the money faster so I can drive that MoPar sooner, less distractions that way, more freedom on the other side. ;)

He's not in the market for anything.

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Guest GrabberOrangeBullit

Helfen...why are you apparently so disturbed about people posting on this thread? Did i forget to patronize the posting police..LOL. Lighten up.

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  • 4 months later...

I'm owning 1969 Chevrolet Impala, got it here at auto auction and it's been my daily driver for 2 years already, never had any serious issues with it. My previous car was also classic one, cars nowadays just don't have the same style as old ones, there's something about those cars that I cannot resist.

Edited by St1oker (see edit history)
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I grew up with parents who were active in the Southern Ohio Chapter of AACA as far back as the 1950's. In about 1970, when I was just about to get my driver's license, my dad found a super-low-mileage 1950 Chevy at an estate sale. He brought it home, and we detailed it for a couple weeks, and then traded it for a 1928 Model A Ford pickup basket case, because dad had always wanted to drive one every day to work. After 14 months of working on it 7-days a week, we got it restored, and he began driving it to work, summer and winter for about a year and a half. I still chuckle when I remember him driving right up a snowy hill, going around modern cars with wide tires which were spinning helplessly, while we kids were trying to push them.

Years later after both dad and the pickup were gone, I started looking for my own Model A to drive every day. Found a 1930 Tudor sedan (older restoration), which wasn't running quite right. Finally found a swollen paper match stick blocking the fuel line from gas tank. I proceeded to drive it every day for about a year. Used a manifold heater to keep me warm in winter, and rolled down windows in summer. This car did occasionally stall out or overheat in heavy traffic, and needed almost constant tinkering. But I could handle that stuff, no big deal. But I was much younger then than I am today.

5-6 years ago I found a red 65 Mustang convert for wife. She had wanted one since her teen years. She drove it on nice days, but before too long she got to missing the power steering, disc brakes, AC, etc. Sold it for small profit, and then bought her a brand new Pontiac Solstice convert for her 50th birthday. She worships that car.

Redvac seems to have his head on straight. Driving cool old cars often is great fun. But having to depend on one for your ONLY daily transportation can be problematic. And the insurance issue might be the final straw. MOST policies I have seen will not permit daily driving an older car to work with agreed replacement value coverage. I have known more than one friend who bought an older car in cream-puff condition, only to have it smashed by a careless driver and then spend many hours and dollars in court trying to get fair replacement value from the other guys' insurance co.

Welcome to the hobby, Redvac. We're glad to have you.

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