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studebrooklyn

1930 Model 64c. not a full classic?!

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dear buick fans -

perhaps as a proud owner of a fully restored 1930 buick 64C sports roadster i'm a bit biased, but has no one else found it hard to believe the the 1930 model 60 is not considered a "Full Classic" by the CCCA? (yet the straight-8 1931 model 90 is) not that i really give a rat's bottom, but just saying......

what do they base these rules on? thoughts?

Edited by studebrooklyn (see edit history)

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Well I think you noted the reason right in your own message. In '30 Buick only had a 6 cyl, but in '31 the 60 series be came the 90 series and as you know from a body and interior perspective they are virtually identical, but the '31 has the first Buick straight-8. While I don't know if that is the specific reason why a '30-60 series is not a Full Classic but the nearly identical '31-90 series is, I would guess that may have a lot to do with it.

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thanks for your thoughts, brian.

the engine is surely what they base it on.

but IMHO, that straight 6 is a marvelous engine; the apex of buick know-how in 1930.

it actually pulls stronger torque than the straight 8, and is virtually as powerful.

but, on the other hand, if my car were a "full classic", i probably never could have afforded it!

maybe someday the CCCA will find it worthy; i hope so.

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IMO, you don't need the CCCA designation to recognize that your car is a classic.

I believe the CCCA intentionally restricted the number of cars they recognize just to be more exclusive.

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The CCCA did not "intentionally restrict" what cars it considers Classics, it put forth a set of standards and named those that met the standards as Classics.

Admittedly, those standards have been stretched in recent years to include cars that are on the borderline.

The Buick Model 90 is a Classic based on engine, price, quality....those things that made the model stand above the norm even when new.....

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David,

I clearly expressed an opinion, so you needn't be so defensive.

The standards reduce the number of cars eligible, therefore by definition they are restrictive & exclusive.

Like Michael, I too "don't give a rat's bottom"; I enjoy my cars for what they are and don't care if the CCCA doesn't consider them to be classics.

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Hi...wasn't trying to be defensive amend apologize if it so sounded...was just stating why that club considers some cars Classics for inclusion in that's club.....I used to care more about the Classic designation but it's been compromised by that club in recent years amend so now not so much....I too enjoy other cars outside that club so understand...

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One more thing, there were over a million cars produced over the years that would fall under the CCCA Classic definition, so it's not as exclusive as one might think....

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It sounds to me that the CCCA is not an organisation with which any of us should be bothered, IMHO anyone who has custody of a PreWar car of any sort has something really special. Who cares what the CCCA thinks (whoever it is!)

cheers

Jules

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It just seems unnecessarily "elitist" to me, and taints the hobby to make these official declarations as to what a "full classic" is.

Just imagine the pride of ownership of any individual who could make good enough to purchase a new car during the depression.

That sentiment alone surely makes any surviving car from that era a "full classic", be it a Ford or a Duesenberg.

Just because a car may have been more expensive, doesn't make it more desirable.

What attracted me to my '30 Buick 64 is probably what would have attracted the original owner: lack of ostentation paired with a big body, superior quality and above average power; and they weren't inexpensive cars when new.

Not everybody's into Caddies and Packards, even if they can afford them; then or now!

But then there are "car guys" and there are "car flippers", the latter of which benefit from and likely make these arbitrary rules.

Edited by studebrooklyn (see edit history)

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