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James B.

1941-1949 Mopar (Chrysler, Dodge, DeSoto, Plymouth) Convertible question

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I hope I am not putting this in the wrong place but I do have a puzzling question and hope someone can solve the myetery?

We have noted that in the 1941-1949 era Mopar that the floorpan has a "riser" or false floor over another on the Convertibles creating a large step-up into the car. This may carry over to other years but the ones we have seen fall into this range of chassis design and not sure if the convertible frame has anything to do with it or if it is a design to keep water out? I have attached a picture of a car in a junk pile (now crushed) that shows the raised floor which runs up to the door sill. This seems to be on only the convertibles. Any help appreciated!

Jim

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I believe that most Chrysler product convertibles had an "extra" frame for strength. Since the bodies had no structural roof, the frame was beefed up to provide for the lack of body stability. I know this was true for the 1936 convertible sedans, but not certain which other cars carried that feature.

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I believe that most Chrysler product convertibles had an "extra" frame for strength. Since the bodies had no structural roof, the frame was beefed up to provide for the lack of body stability. I know this was true for the 1936 convertible sedans, but not certain which other cars carried that feature.

True. All of the Chrysler products from 1932 to 1940 used a strengthened frame that had a cross section shaped like an X. After 1941 only convertibles had them but from what we have seen, the brace is no higher than the side rails and the center part that the transmission tail or driveshaft goes through is higher on the top but sits inside the tunnel of the floorboard so doesn't interfere. If you look the material used that seems higher in the convertible picture, it is made of something that doesn't rust - aluminum? I am thinking it is a cap of sorts, false floor that sits over the contoured floor pan so water doesn't settle in the low spots to rust it out. This top layer is smooth to shed water if the top is left down? Just a theory that needs verified or not? Thanks!

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I was not referring to the "X" insert between the rails. I was meaning to say the extra frame was over the top of the standard frame. Then they would put an aluminum sill plate to cover the upper frame.

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I was not referring to the "X" insert between the rails. I was meaning to say the extra frame was over the top of the standard frame. Then they would put an aluminum sill plate to cover the upper frame.

That I have not seen.

Here is a picture of a 1948 Chrysler convertible frame but don't see a stacked one? If you come across an example please post it!

I understand that Hudson around this same time did have some sort of double stack (quarter pounder with cheese) frame? :-) would like to see it but think it was hanging lower rather than higher?

Jim

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Edited by James B. (see edit history)

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There is no extra raised frame or Riser on top of the frame on any 1941-8 Mopar cars. That was on the late 30's Mopar cars like a friends 39 plymouth convertible.

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My 36 Chrysler has it, my 48 Plymouth floor is flat where it meets the rocker. The rocker on the 48 is pretty substantial. The rocker is very slim on the 36. That's probably why they were able to do away with the extra frame.

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Any way you could post some photos of the 1936 double? I was able to find a rotten example where some on the ground under the car shots were made and if I am not mistaken, it isn't a double frame in the true sense. But rather a series of braces welded to the body with some following the frame shape and that added height gave way to the drop side floorboard so the body profile matches other bodies. With that said I am sure the seat height was altered and people having to stretch their legs more straight out as opposed to the way people sat on seats during those times?

Edited by James B. (see edit history)

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The floor is flat in my '42 DeSoto convertible, with no boxed section.

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The floor is flat in my '42 DeSoto convertible, with no boxed section.

Dave, are you sure the floor isn't raised from the bottom edge of the door sill rocker like in the picture where you see the silver color riser? Someone else had 1941 Desoto convertible and they did have the riser.

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The S10 42 DeSoto convert will have the same style frame and flat floor as the 48 T&C bottom side picture posted above.

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The '42 DeSoto floor is flush with the rocker door sill. It's the same body and frame as the '48 Chrysler pictured above.

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Dave, I asked my friend who had a 41 Desoto which has the 41-48 chassis / floor pan configuration but they said the topside of the floor in the convertible was flat, no driveshaft hump-tunnel. This leads to believe there was a second floor laid over top of the coupe style floor as a double floor and the enclosed running boards count as the riser height on this body style as opposed to the previous exterior running boards that shows the riser more. So, do you have any door shots of the interior showing the floor? Why would they use a double hull floor design for the 1941-1942? Only thing I can think of is besides strength is to shed water. Jim.

[EDIT] I have since found out that my friend's 1941 was actually a 1942. I found pictures online and it shows a hump for the front floorboard so possibly they were mistaken? But Dave also says his floorboard is "flat" in his 1942 so not sure what he is saying without photos? The late '30s seem to have a floor that sits above the hump area making it flat across like those on a front wheel drive car. The support beams welded to the floor creating the second "frame" raises it to that height. Sorry if I have only muddied the water here but trying to straighten it out. Thanks.

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Edited by James B. (see edit history)

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The S10 42 DeSoto convert will have the same style frame and flat floor as the 48 T&C bottom side picture posted above.

Any interior door shots to see how it is configured? See my reply to Dave. I have seen the 1941 convertible chassis shot and it is like the 1948 above but the topside floorboard was flat so had a double floor as opposed to a single with the late '30s style. Thanks.

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The photo posted above by James B is a '42 DeSoto, not a '41. The floor is just like mine with a transmission / driveshaft hump. At the sides of the floor pan, the floor is flush with the sill step plate. There is no boxed riser section. I'll try to take a photo this weekend of the door sill area and post. It looks like your friend owns the black '42 conv. Can you send me a PM about it's location. Just trying to determine if it is one of the four known to exist or another one that has surfaced. Thanks

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Dave, that is what I said later that he typed the wrong year... was a '42. he no longer owns it but yes, was one of the Fifth Avenues. Your photos sound like a plan!

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Hopefully this will put this one to bed...........Here are photo's of my '42 DeSoto conv in all of its unrestored, in storage beauty! There is no boxed higher floor for an additional frame. The floor is flush to to sill.

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A long time ago someone had told me that the older Plymouth Convertibles had a double floor but Chrysler, Dodge and DeSoto did not. My 42 Dodge Convertible does not either. I don't believe I have seen a 42 Plymouth Convertible to know either way. But so far all the "no's" have come from Chrysler, Dodge and DeSoto owners. Any 1942 Plymouth Convertible Owners out there?

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