Jump to content

One Time Registration, NY State


Recommended Posts

  • 5 weeks later...

I would like to see New York wave the annual vehicle inspection for historic vehicles. If not 25 year old cars, how about at the very least cars which are 100 years old !

There's not much to inspect on a 100 year old car anyway, and considering how much they are driven, why force an owner to submit to an inspection when the guys doing the inspection have no clue as what they are looking at?

--Scott

Link to post
Share on other sites
I would like to see New York wave the annual vehicle inspection for historic vehicles. If not 25 year old cars, how about at the very least cars which are 100 years old !

There's not much to inspect on a 100 year old car anyway, and considering how much they are driven, why force an owner to submit to an inspection when the guys doing the inspection have no clue as what they are looking at?

--Scott

The state is looking for $10

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

That reason is that the One-Time registration in Virginia places restrictions on the car's use. Although the restrictions are fairly mild and not rigorously enforced, they are still the LAW and we all must decide if we are law-abiding citizens or choose to act outside the law (outlaws).

Virginia requires that you sign a statement that you have another "legally annual licensed vehicle" to have one time antique tags on your antique vehicles. As such, legally I can drive a different one of my antique cars each day to keep them in good operating condition. Since I drive very few miles, I never go over the mileage limit imposed on these cars.

Link to post
Share on other sites
that's 100 buck fine if you get caught and also have to lie on the registration renewal form.

I haven't been challenged as of yet for lack of inspection. Although if I hit a registration checkpoint it may be a different story. Also they don't ask for the inspection number on the registration anymore so registration is easy. When I went to get my '35 Plymouth inspected they refuse to pass it because the vacuum wiper didn't work. This car will never see rain and a replacement is scarce so what's the point. I'll explain it to the cop if I get stopped. And the Model T? Check the brakes? Oh, you mean brake.. I do get my more modern vehicle (1949) inspected.

Link to post
Share on other sites
There's not much to inspect on a 100 year old car anyway, and considering how much they are driven, why force an owner to submit to an inspection when the guys doing the inspection have no clue as what they are looking at? --Scott

Agree. With one of my vehicles, the sheriff came out to inspect it and just shrugged his shoulders and called for another person to come out and look at it. The second sheriff just signed the form as I knew more about the vehicle than he did. Humor on the form was things like high and low beams.... I asked if you wanted me to turn the kerosene lights up or down?? The guy was a good guy with good humor.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually if you renew your old cars online now in NY state it has to have a current inspection. I let one lapse as it hadn't been driven in a year or two. When I went to reregister it because the registration was about to expire it wouldn't let me register it. I had to have it inspected. After getting it inspected which would mean driving it out of registration, the computer knew it had been inspected and I was able to reregister it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Aubunseeker, I've been renewing by mail and several years ago they stopped asking for the inspection number on the form. As you can see in the photo I get the registration every year. I do this for 3 cars. Maybe the computer hasn't caught up to me yet.

post-99718-143142431043_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not telling anyone to follow my example. Sometimes my vehicles don't get inspected on time due to mechanical problems where they don't get to the station on time to get inspected. Some don't make it down for several months or even years such as my Model A. But I keep the Registration current so I don't have a problem with the DMV. So far I haven't had any problems.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it possible to register a vehicle --- an antique vehicle --- in another state?

I recall that college atudents who typically have driver's licenses from other states can buy a car and register it in New York, even though they do not actually live in New York. I think all they need is a New York address.

Several states do not have vehicle inspections for antiques, some like North Carolina are exempt if a car is 35 years old or more. So would a state like North Carolina issue a registration for a car when the owner doesn't actually live in North Carolina?

Link to post
Share on other sites
if they do ny wouldn't considered it legally registered

In a literal sense, probably, but the point is that out-of-state cars are in any given state all the time. If I move to North Carolina or Minnesota, I think I can keep my NY plates for about as long as I want and same for coming to NY. I mean, college students do that for four years and more.

I think it may be one of those things that it's only illegal if you get caught. But how are you going to get caught? A student who graduated a year ago and is still renting from me has a Wisconsin driver's license but bought a Mini Cooper in NY with NY registration. If he gets pulled over, what law is he breaking? New York issued the registration in full knowledge that he lived in another state!

Link to post
Share on other sites
They would do it for the same reason I keep my 1966 on annual plates in Virginia and get it inspected every year.

That reason is that the One-Time registration in Virginia places restrictions on the car's use. Although the restrictions are fairly mild and not rigorously enforced, they are still the LAW and we all must decide if we are law-abiding citizens or choose to act outside the law (outlaws).

In order to get the One-Time Registration, you must sign an affidavit that you understand and will abide by those restrictions as well as prove that you have a Normal-Use car in addition to the restricted-use car.

That part of the last (2007) legislation never made sense to me as the DMV has all that info in their data base. Unless you are driving a company car, odds are you own a vehicle registered for normal use. They sure don't have any problems keeping up with my license renewals and personal property taxes.

Once you dug far enough into that bill to see the financial projections you'd see it was never about getting questionable antique plates off the roads. It was about the possibility of raising $9 million in additional revenue. I still haven't forgiven the legislator who introduced all that nonsense, and I have told him several times he does not represent my interests in Richmond and as long as I live in the 14th House District, I will campaign and vote for anyone who challenges his seat.

I well remember the session we had with him, taxing authorities, and law enforcement in Lynchburg. A Lynchburg Region member asked a young State Trooper exactly how he planned to enforce the new statute. The Trooper pointed to the legislator and the state tax department rep and said "When these gentlemen tell me how to do it". And neither of those gentlemen said a word.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Here being NC...left that part out..oops. Let me go on to say that a NC driver license or ID card is required upon registration of a vehicle here in the State. If you have an out of state driver license or ID card, then it is required that you fill out the residency agreement. Too many people were making up addresses here in NC to avoid high registration and insurance fees in other parts of the Country.

Edited by blackmountain (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

I consider Pennsylvania friendly to antique cars.

Registration is done once (when you acquire the car)

and is permanent. No inspections are needed.

The problems of inspecting old cars, described in

this thread, show why inspecting seldom-driven

antique cars having systems unfamiliar to the inspectors

is difficult and unnecessary.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I consider Pennsylvania friendly to antique cars.

Registration is done once (when you acquire the car)

and is permanent. No inspections are needed.

The problems of inspecting old cars, described in

this thread, show why inspecting seldom-driven

antique cars having systems unfamiliar to the inspectors

is difficult and unnecessary.

Boy I'll say !

Now New York has a computerized system where every car needs to be scanned in to the government computer.

A month ago I brought the 1912 in for its annual inspection, and the government computer couldn't handle something that old ! Said my VIN was invalid or some nonsense. How could it be invalid?? New York DMV issued me the registration on that number. ???

So I had to take time off from work and go down to the DMV office and talk to the DMV Head and County Clerk himself. And he didn't know what to do ! Finally he found out that whoever does the inspection needs to call some "Bureau of Vehicle Harassment" in Albany and they have to walk the inspection guys through how to do it on the computer. What a pain .

I haven't done it yet. Had to fix something and just got the car on the road recently. So I don't know if they will give me an inspection sticker or not. And what am I supposed to do if they refuse? They issued the registration.

And it's all for nothing. NOTHING except to get the state more of our money.

As soon as I can retire, I'm going to defect to a state with less heavy-handed government.

--Scott

Edited by scott12180 (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Many parts of New York are beautiful, Scott.

But I wouldn't want to go through all that

rigmarole with my cars, either!

Imagine someone with, say, 20 or 30 cars.

There are many collectors with that many or more,

and with a large collection, some may get driven

only once a year. What a nuisance to have to go

get everything inspected once a year--trailering

the oldest ones, perhaps--if they get driven only

a few dozen miles!

In Pennsylvania PRIVATE repair garages are authorized

to do the annual inspection for non-antique cars.

No state is perfect; but I really think Pennsylvania's

car-friendly rules help promote the hobby here,

and the ease of ownership encourages people to

own several cars!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 9 months later...
  • 7 months later...
  • 9 months later...
  • 1 year later...

The one time registration bill for NY was my bill. I served in the NYS Assembly. The state DMV did not want to do this so it went no wheres along with my bill for NY to offer titles for vehicles prior to 1973. I tried and was proud to do so . I was Chair of the SEMA state legislators caucus for 6 years.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...