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Lincoln

1930 Head Removal and Replacement

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What is the proper procedure for removing the head from the cylinder and replacing it back on the cylinder on a 1930 Franklin. My 1937 Chilton Flat Rate and Tune Up Manual on page 383 reads - quote- " If head is heated in boiling water, it may expand sufficiently to allow removal by hand". I have never removed a head before and I do not want to learn things the hard way.

Edited by Lincoln (see edit history)

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The safe way to remove the head is pull the whole jug assemble and push it off using a tool easily made from a threaded rod and some flat steel. Cut a piece of strap steel that can be bolted to the cyl base.Drill a hole in the center of the strap steel and weld a nut in place. Next get a piece of 3/4 or 1 inch threaded rod that will thread into this nut. I use a piece of hard wood cut so it will fit in the cyl so when you PUSH the head from the jug it will not harm anything. This is the extreme case ,as most heads will pop off withn out too much effort at all. Ive heard of shade tree mechanics removed the head with out pulling cyl by removing spark plug and incerting about 2 ft of rope and bumping the car over. Ive never done and wouldnt recommend it.

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Kinda like giving your car enough rope and it will hang itself. Back to serious the head is not on that tight so it should pull back on easily with the head bolts.

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Tool I used to separate head from cylinder;n<wbr>uts are welded; the HD washer is 2.75" but note beveled cuts for flat fit. Washer is reqd due to high pressure of nut on the washer while turning. Worked on 6 heads without a problem.

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For what it is worth>>> more on the last one: Double nuts welded on this side; rod is 1/2", a 1/2" nut is welded on other side of plate, plate is threaded 1/2-13; double nuts on other end of rod; large 2" HD washer is against head to distribute load. 3/8" bolts in cylinder base. Used heat on aluminum head while turning this slowly.

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I can't weld or machine metal, you guys are overthinking this. Lay the cylinder/head assembly on its side on and at the edge of a work bench. Get a length of tree limb about 7 inches long. Stick it in your cylinder. ( fooled ya!) Fasten two lengths of wood on the bottom of the cylinder extending down the front of the workbench using fender washers to spread the load. Whack the stick. Works for me.

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I have had good luck just takeing a 4x4 and cutting off the corners so it fits nicely in the cylinder. then just lightly tap the end and it has pushed off some stuborn heads. Just tap lightly do not use the 80 pound sledge!!

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Don't force it , Get a bigger hammer.

I laid the jug on a 4x6, inserted a 2x4 in the cylinder, warmed the head up with a blow torch, and tapped it off. It did not take much heat, just hot to the touch and and it came right off with a few taps with a large ball pean hammer.

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I'm trying to free up two stuck exhaust valves in #4 and #6 cylinder on my 137. Engine is still in the car. I was surprised to read that its best to remove the cylinder from the car and knock it off with a wood block from the inside. Isn't it possible to just unbolt the head and lift it off the cylinder while its still on the engine? I'm probably guilty of thinking its the same as any conventional water cooled engine, but wondering why the head doesn't simply unbolt? Aircraft style air-cooled engines are different than anything I've ever worked on, but then again that isn't saying much.

Another thing, I notice that when I spray penetrating oil on the valve mechanism, I'm seeing it seep back out at the base of the head where it meets the cylinder. I'm guessing that's a bad sign?

Sorry to be askiing what are no doubt stupid questions but this is my first Franklin.

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"doesn't simply unbolt" most likely because there are no seperate cylinder heads on engines with vertical fins such as a '29 137 would have. If it has horizonal fins it is a later "side draft" engine which would have seperate heads. Which is it? Sounds like this job should be in a new thread.

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Vertical fins. I think you are right this is the wrong thread. sorry.

If I ever get the 1929 parts manual to download successfully from the club website maybe I won't have so many silly questions.

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