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1065 Riviera Headlamp Motor


redreattaruss
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OK Russ: Got the wire caps today, thanks. I have already disassembled and cleaned them and have replaced a few components with some other similar caps from my stash. I now have two really nice caps and lots of parts left over. Those parts came at the exact right time for me.

I wasn't familiar with junk yards in San Francisco in the early 70's so I can't comment to what I saw. I can only theorize. My first year in the car business was 1970 and in New Jersey. I remember a white 67 Riv coming in on trade at the place I worked for. The boss appraised it at $1350. and I thought that if they wholesaled it perhaps I could get it. Clean and lo miles. They didn't make the deal but that $1350. stuck in my mind. I wound up getting an edgy 63 for $400 and I tried to wholesale it and finally got $375. From that info I'm thinking that in 1970-ish first Gen-Rivs were between $300-$1500 retail, actually given the dollar value that was quite a big spread in the values.

In 1970 a 7 year old car was about at the end of it's first cycle and I could see a First-Gen Riv that was damaged hitting bone yards then. Several things to factor in here. The 63 had a Dynaflow and that was a more expensive repair than a TH-400 and that might have knocked a few out of the air. The rust belt was dealing with the Tin Worm armies and that might have come to play. The last major factor I can think of that got these of the roads was a yearly state vehicle inspection. This would cover items like the ball joints, brakes and exhaust,. As restorers, these items now don't seem to be overwhelming but then, a repair on these cars with new parts and labor could easily discourage an owner form doing the said repair, leading to a quick boot down the food chain.

I arrived in Oakland in 1974 and started hitting the Hayward yards in about 75-76....hard. Prices on the old cars and parts were actually rising then. Inflation was ramped and new cars were climbing in price on many occasions. I think that the first-Gen Rivs also started to have a resurgence in popularity and were somewhat saved from destruction.

I was in extreme shock when I saw mid-60's cars cleaner than the one I gave up in New Jersey strewn all over wrecking yards like it was nothing. Mitch

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  • 3 weeks later...
I have two complete ready to go on the shelf but I do NOT use the forum to promote my hobby/business . Thank You ,

Do you happen to have any support brackets. My friend lives in san diego, just moved there from mass a couple of years ago. You may have seen his black 65 riv gs with white interior floating around. He could pick it up for me so you wouldnt have to deal with shipping.

Thanks

Herb

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OK Riviera People: I'm 0 for 6 on headlight motors and to be honest with you it's not really that important. I think I saw only a hand full of First-Gen Rivs at shows I've attended in the last year or two but I can't recall seeing anything on the road in that same period of time.

As far as production figures the 65 Riv was a shade over 30,000 units. The survival rate might be, and this is just a wild guess....12.5%. This would mean that 87.5% of all 65 Rivs got the squish. How many motors do you think are out there anyway? Mitch

Oh, maybe I would do more retirement planning in order to purchase a busted up old clam, motor haha.

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it would be cheaper to get one of those small circus monkeys to pull on the arms-what 5 pounds of peanuts a week-as long as he didnt sh## on everything.just my 2cnts.happy rivin t.nugent roa 12969...

Its really time to ditch this antique motor assembly.... ALL of us should figure the linear actuator angle out as a retrofit for the 65's that need a new motor or dont even have one....I want to find a 3D scanner and at least get the exact dimensions of the pivot point heights and locations related to the mounting locations of the original motor on the front core support . With that, fabbing up a rotating arm like whats on the original motor and having an actuator make it move cant be that hard...We have all seen the youtube video of the white 65 with the actuator...I have tried and tried and tried to get the gentlman to contact me about his setup but to no avail....too bad!!! I have read so many posts here from some seriously intellegent ,engineering kinda minded folks ... who wants to work on this ?????????

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Its really time to ditch this antique motor assembly.... ALL of us should figure the linear actuator angle out as a retrofit for the 65's that need a new motor or dont even have one....I want to find a 3D scanner and at least get the exact dimensions of the pivot point heights and locations related to the mounting locations of the original motor on the front core support . With that, fabbing up a rotating arm like whats on the original motor and having an actuator make it move cant be that hard...We have all seen the youtube video of the white 65 with the actuator...I have tried and tried and tried to get the gentlman to contact me about his setup but to no avail....too bad!!! I have read so many posts here from some seriously intellegent ,engineering kinda minded folks ... who wants to work on this ?????????

Perhaps the guy with the actuator program is getting a patten / getting ready for production ? Takes a little time .

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  • 4 months later...

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