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1965 Buick Riviera Gran Sport at Mecum Anaheim


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Wow, 65k. That's certainly a decent number. Good to see these cars are finally bringing deserving numbers (even though it didn't sell). IMO, they have been undervalued for quite some time.

One thing though. Why would they do a frame off restoration, and not replace the Super Wildcat emblem on the Chrome Air Cleaner? Odd.

Edited by Rob J (see edit history)
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One thing though. Why would they do a frame off restoration, and not replace the Super Wildcat emblem on the Chrome Air Cleaner? Odd.

These types of oversites and errors seem to be quite common on big buck Riviera restorations. There are a few on the that car. I think its because the high end resto shops don't take the time to join ROA and seek sources for those special parts or authenticity correctness. and this is because the owner doesn't know enough or care enough for it to be as authentically correct as possible. Their job (resto shop) is to make it look pretty with high curb appeal.

As anyone who restores a Riviera discovers, there is no one stop shop for parts or tech advice and typically will require parts and supplies from 20 different sources.

Edited by JZRIV (see edit history)
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Wow, 65k. That's certainly a decent number. Good to see these cars are finally bringing deserving numbers (even though it didn't sell). IMO, they have been undervalued for quite some time.

I hate to see classic car values so high. It really puts the hobby out of reach for most.

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I hate to see classic car values so high. It really puts the hobby out of reach for most.

That is an understandable arguement, but when values are higher, people tend to restore and preserve the valued cars more as well. If a car's value is too low, then nobody will care about investing in a quality restoration, and they'll just continue to rot away. I'd prefer them to maintain higher values.

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That is an understandable arguement, but when values are higher, people tend to restore and preserve the valued cars more as well. If a car's value is too low, then nobody will care about investing in a quality restoration, and they'll just continue to rot away. I'd prefer them to maintain higher values.

I'd prefer to drive and enjoy my cars. Over paying on a car puts a damper on that. For the most part. A guy that spends over 70k+ on a Riviera GS is going to add it to a collection. It's going to sit and rot un-driven. In time a shiny useless boat anchor. Keep your far fetched higher values.

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Remember these cars are pushing 50 years old. There were points in the depreciation cycle when even the most expensive were good buys. We are heading into an economic cycle where money and securities will lose favor as investments. There are some '80 and '90's cars that will be pretty desirable 10 or 15 years from now. Some real nice Corvettes are out there at under $10,000; maybe $5,000 to $6,000 for a '96 Fleetwood. In the right color a Crown Vic should be a good bet at around $5,000. I'm glad I snagged my '94 Impala for $9,000. My wife has a low price for it at the estate sale. Not while I am still kicking, though.

Bernie

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There are some '80 and '90's cars that will be pretty desirable 10 or 15 years from now.

Bernie

Yep, like my all original, only 16k mile, mint 87 Grand National. It will only go up in value as time goes along. Especially since it is 100% original, stock, and still riding on it's factory tires.

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OK Riviera People: Heed my warning. Classic cars are not an investment. They are something to be enjoyed. If anybody thinks they are investing they are heck-o-mistaken. Mitch

Generally speaking I agree; however, there are too many variables to paint all classics and situations as not being an investment. For example I can think of several cars I would have rather have invested in 15 years ago, payed for upkeep and insurance compared to my pathetic 401k. No question I would have been much further ahead to have the car(s). But.....Just like investing in the stock market, when it comes to cars you have to do your homework before making a purchase and that coupled with a little luck you'll have something to "enjoy" that will appreciate in value including offsetting the maintenance costs. Speaking of that, 401ks have maintenance (management fees) too. They just aren't that visible by design.

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These types of oversites and errors seem to be quite common on big buck Riviera restorations. There are a few on the that car. I think its because the high end resto shops don't take the time to join ROA and seek sources for those special parts or authenticity correctness. and this is because the owner doesn't know enough or care enough for it to be as authentically correct as possible. Their job (resto shop) is to make it look pretty with high curb appeal.

As anyone who restores a Riviera discovers, there is no one stop shop for parts or tech advice and typically will require parts and supplies from 20 different sources.

Thats for sure Jason. Not an easy undertaking at all. roa is vital in getting the right stuff and info.

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