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Just in case anyone is interested, saw this post in my area of SE Washington state on Craigslist. For those that aren't scared of projects!

1933 Oldsmobile sedan Straight 8

Doc

Thanks for posting. Awesome. I have never seen a 1933 Oldsmobile and I have been looking for a pre war Oldsmobile. However, virtually all finds have been from 1937 to 1941, which while technically pre war, are not as interesting to me. And this is an 8 cyl but I know so little of pre war Olds history that I don't even know if they made 6 cyl Olds in 1933.

This has to be very rare. That grille is crazy. I know what 1933 Fords, Buicks look like but that is a different take on the 33-34 grille era.

Information in case it drops off Craigs List:

It is a roller but tires are rotten, breaks work as is. steering works. original * streight 8 flathead. some glass still. You could have this car looking like the red sister car photo.with some seriouse work. I will consider trades. cars, trucks, boats, jet skis. Try me out am easy to deal with.

509-588-56zero9

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Olds only had two series in '33 - Six and Eight. Sometimes referred to as F-33 and L-33, respectively. Yes, eights were on the longer wheelbase. This was a change from '32 when sixes and eights were on the same wheelbase.

$3k seems excessive, unless I am that out of touch with reality...

He doesn't show much of the passenger front 1/4 which has been obviously crumpled.

I am an 8 cylinder "senior car" man, but on a '33 I prefer the grille of six.

Paul

Edited by Oldsfan (see edit history)
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Olds only had two series in '33 - Six and Eight. Sometimes referred to as F-33 and L-33, respectively. Yes, eights were on the longer wheelbase. This was a change from '32 when sixes and eights were on the same wheelbase.

$3k seems excessive, unless I am that out of touch with reality...

He doesn't show much of the passenger front 1/4 which has been obviously crumpled.

I am an 8 cylinder "senior car" man, but on a '33 I prefer the grille of six.

Paul

Paul

Thanks. I was hoping you would comment.

1. $3000 is too high. I offered him $1500 by email.

2. Thanks for the catch on the passenger front fender, I did not notice that.

3. What is the history on that 8 cyl? I am more of a Buick guy and I believe 1931 was the year Buick went all 8 cyl and of course Buick's are OHV Straight 8's I love the visual look of that Olds Straight 8. If you look at some of the classic engines of the 30's they are styling exercises in themselves.

What cubic inch size is the Straight 8? and wheelbase?

I just purchased thr Kimes Oldsmobile History Book on Amazon. May be too late on this one but this is what I am looking for for a pre war Olds.

As you may recall, I went to the OCA National meet (volunteered) in Des Moines last July and it was mostly A Body, some full size sixties and customs. I volunteered to check in cars so I could see what came in when they came in. Unfortunately I don't remember any 30's Oldsmobiles and a quick check of ebay from time to time basically only has late 30's and early 40's Oldsmobiles.

I also subscribe to Hemmings Motor News and the 1900's to 1930's Oldsmobiles are almost non existent. Either they are all owned by museums or older members that aren't selling.

My issue with this car is it is probably one of only a handful of 1933 8 cylinder cars left in the world and as you can see it seems to only get passed along as an ever- deteriorating "project" car because no one really wants to dig in on the expensive restoration. I don't blame them but eventually someone will stick a Chevy S10 truck frame under it and discard the Straight 8 for a Chevy small block, then give up on that project and offer it as a "Rat Rod" project.

Here is another dreamer from Iowa:

http://desmoines.craigslist.org/cto/3396295649.html

Edited by BJM (see edit history)
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The difference between $1500 and $3000 is pretty meaningless, compared to the cost to restore this car. That said, it should be saved. No one that I'm aware of made a bad looking car in 1933, and this is no exception. How many early to mid Oldsmobiles does one see?

Someone make the down payment on the restoration and buy this car!

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Dave

I have been buying cars throughout 2012 and have 5 more on my radar. Initial cost is often as consideration. I need to buy at minimal cost. Especially since this car is in Washington and I am in Iowa. I received a favorable response from the seller and will call him. I would NOT buy this without unloading a couple of my cars, for sure.

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Bryan,

I think most of the information you are looking for can be found here:

1933 Oldsmobile Brochure

I believe the 8 was new for '32.

Paul

Paul,

Once again thank you for the information. I am due to speak to the seller today.

I read through the information and found it revealing. Given that I generally collect Buicks I tend to compare Oldsmobile to Buicks. I believe across the board Buick OHV Straight Eights were larger in displacement but I'll have to go check my references.

Wheelbase is listed as 119 inches for all models. This is on the short side for a 4 door sedan at the depths of the depression. But combined with the smaller engine displacement I am left to deduce that Oldsmobile was positioning itself to capture sales for loyal Oldsmobile owners that might have been looking at lesser cars (Chevrolet / Plymouth / Ford) .

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I hope this car can be saved as they must be quite rare. I also know where there is a 32 Oldsmobile for sale not too far away in Oregon, and it is also an 8. Let me know if there's any interest. I've met the guy before, as I bought an 66 Olds Toro parts car from him. I'll see if I can find the listing and post it here. I briefly considered the 32, but too many irons in the fire and it wasn't quite in my usual repertoire.

Tim

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I hope this car can be saved as they must be quite rare. I also know where there is a 32 Oldsmobile for sale not too far away in Oregon, and it is also an 8. Let me know if there's any interest. I've met the guy before, as I bought an 66 Olds Toro parts car from him. I'll see if I can find the listing and post it here. I briefly considered the 32, but too many irons in the fire and it wasn't quite in my usual repertoire.

Tim

Tim, Interesting. You have 2 rare cars there. As noted 1932 was 1st year for the Olds 8 cyl cars. If it is not a bother, please post photos and sale price.

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I hope this car can be saved as they must be quite rare. I also know where there is a 32 Oldsmobile for sale not too far away in Oregon, and it is also an 8. Let me know if there's any interest. I've met the guy before, as I bought an 66 Olds Toro parts car from him. I'll see if I can find the listing and post it here. I briefly considered the 32, but too many irons in the fire and it wasn't quite in my usual repertoire.

Tim

It is quite rare. And if it is complete it could be saved. The only thing, the buyer must realize that he'll never recoup his investment.

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The 32 seems to be gone -- for now. Can't find an ad for it now, so maybe it sold. I bought a 67 Toronado parts car from him about 2 years ago, and he was trying to sell this 32 Olds then, but I'm (still) ankle deep in projects (one of which is the Toro restoration). I saw the ad for this 32 Olds just a month ago; I remember that I looked it up and there were only something on the order of 5400 of these eights made, so it's rare. If it shows up again, I'll post a notice here.

Tim

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The 32 seems to be gone -- for now. Can't find an ad for it now, so maybe it sold. I bought a 67 Toronado parts car from him about 2 years ago, and he was trying to sell this 32 Olds then, but I'm (still) ankle deep in projects (one of which is the Toro restoration). I saw the ad for this 32 Olds just a month ago; I remember that I looked it up and there were only something on the order of 5400 of these eights made, so it's rare. If it shows up again, I'll post a notice here.

Tim

Tim

Thanks. It's hard to get good information on 30's Oldsmobiles so few of the 30-35 Oldsmobiles are collected. I bought a book which I felt would have good text and photo reference but it haf very little information.

Paul Hartlieb posted the best information above - the 1933 Full Line Catalog.

I think I mentioned that I received a "quick" response from the seller of the 1933 car, I offered $1500 and he accepted. I then located a running/driving 67 Toronado "in my backyard" so to speak and snatched it up for $800.

I have no issue buying the 33 Olds 8 for $1500 even with a crumpled fender and needing so much, but the cost to transport it back to Iowa would add at least $1500 and I doubt I could find someone to do it for me. Have spent about $3000 in transport costs the last 2 years to bring cars I wanted to me. The cost to drive the Toronado to my house was $15 in gas (and I loved every minute of it) .

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Bryan,

Are you getting the 33 or not? Hope you can keep us informed here how it goes. post-89110-143139288916_thumb.jpgLet me know how your 67 Toro looks. I am in the midst of restoring mine, and it seems to have all the rare options. Best was that I did buy it from the original owner. Anyway, i've had to learn a lot about these cars, and they are more complicated that I thought to restore. I'm getting ready to tackle the CV joints/final drive and then the tranny, engine go back in and we start getting an assembly operation going instead of increasing entropy.

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Ok, found the 1932 Olds ad, so it's still available. Located in eastern Oregon. Seller is easy to deal with -- good guy who works for the Oregon DOT I think. Those of you familiar with Olds of this era will know whats correct or not, but just the pictures look correct to me. don't know if it's an original straight 8 in this vehicle, but if so, that would make it quite rare.

1932 Oldsmobile price reduced $1000

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Bryan,

Are you getting the 33 or not? Hope you can keep us informed here how it goes. [ATTACH=CONFIG]166712[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]166713[/ATTACH]Let me know how your 67 Toro looks. I am in the midst of restoring mine, and it seems to have all the rare options. Best was that I did buy it from the original owner. Anyway, i've had to learn a lot about these cars, and they are more complicated that I thought to restore. I'm getting ready to tackle the CV joints/final drive and then the tranny, engine go back in and we start getting an assembly operation going instead of increasing entropy.

Doc

You are my hero for doing a Toronado restoration. Not many folks try. I restored a 66 Dubonnet Toronado mechanically. I bought it for $900, drove it home. I attended a tech school for automotive and used the Toronado to get through engines class, brakes and someone in transmissions rebuilt it.

I removed the drivetrain and installed it myself without taking the front clip off and it just about did me in. Trying to line everything up.

I plan on a full restoration on the 67 I found, then never letting this one go. It's a bluish/silver with black standard interior (no rear passenger door pull) It has power windows and power seat, but the power window switch is not in the armrest as on deluxe Toronados.

It even has the chrome wheels in excellent shape. Awaiting garage time. I'll add photos later. But glad you are doing a Toronado.

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This is a started project most of the body work has been done,engine has been rebuilt its a inline flat head 8 cyclinder, tires are new.If your looking for a car that you dont see very often this may be for you. Call JIM if you have Questions 541-620-2323. send me your email if you want more pictures thanks. I do have a title.I've had this for sale for awhile will consider a offer thanks JIM Anderson.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I find the artillery wheels quite interesting. They're a lot like something that could be bought today and I think that they're somewhat distracting from the line and form of the body. There's a fellow who's restoring a F-33 (that's a six cylinder) sedan that has a website you might enjoy.

Welcome to 33olds.com - The only site on the internet dedicated to the 1933 Oldsmobile!

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I find the artillery wheels quite interesting. They're a lot like something that could be bought today and I think that they're somewhat distracting from the line and form of the body.

The January issue of HMN did a story on these wheels. It compared them to Cadillac Sabre wheels of the mid-to-late 50's. Per HMN they are a 1 year only item.

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Sheesh, that's a beautiful year for Oldsmobile, and you rarely see them...I don't think I've ever seen one "in the flesh".

One of the pictures reminds me, I've never quite understood the machine gun thing with old cars....I know, I know, it's gangsters...but to me it's just silly......

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I hadn't considered how much the 30s artilleries look like Sabres.

Agreed that 30s Oldsmobiles are elegant cars and seldom seen. You don't often see pre-wars even at big Oldsmobile shows.

Re tommy-guns and 30s cars: corny as it is, I'd rather see that than a crybaby kid doll hung on the bumper. Whoever came up with those as a car show prop should be beat about the ears with one.

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Regarding tommy guns and cars of the 30s -- I suppose many people have in mind the iconic pictures of Clyde and Bonnie with their guns when they posed with the early V-8 Fords, so that's why they associate gangsters with those cars of that era, even though they really don't generally know much about the history of that era -- so anything with running boards and that general look will work with the tommy guns. If you read about the early 30s gangsters, you find out that Clyde preferred the Ford V-8s while Dillinger and Baby Face Nelson preferred the Hudson Terraplane eights. Essentially the gangster era pretty much ended by mid 1936 with the capture of Karpis. Alvin "Creepy" Karpis survived till 1979, dying in Spain (after serving time at Alcatraz and McNeil Island Penitentiary, WA, he was deported to his native Canada and from there ended up in Spain). I live out in eastern Washington state and was surprised to read that Machine Gun Kelley had held up a bank in the small town of Colfax, WA -- not exactly the midwest -- was quite a large heist at the time. Anyway, the film taken by one of the Texas law officers immediately after killing Clyde and Bonnie is another association of the guns with these 30s cars. I recommend reading the book "Go Down Together" if you're interested in Bonnie/Clyde story. Here is the video of the B/C death car. They hauled the car back into the town with the bodies still in the car where they were examined at a local mortician's office.

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Cadillac Sabre wheels--that completes the image I was thinking when I made the remark. I can recall someone in the recent past having new "Turbine" wheels, as well. While they aren't my favorite artillery wheel, I'll bet they would be incredibly valuable on the (ugh!) Rat Rod market. The photos I posted above are just of the eight cylinder Olds for '33 -- the "L-33" models. There are a lot more '33 Oldsmobiles (F--33 six cylinder cars) on Google, Yahoo and Bing. They are handsome cars, as well -- just a couple of inches shorter and with more conventional grilles and wheels. While I personally own a couple of coupes, there are plenty of sedans that I find beautiful. I'm including a couple of pics on one of my very most favorite GM cars of the thirties -- the '35 Olds eight cylinder four door. I'm not an expert (on anything, actually), but I think that this body first came out in the form of the '34 LaSalle. A two-pieced windshield was added for use in '35. Gm used this body forLaSalle, Olds and senior Pontiacs, I think, but Cadillacs and Buicks continued to use a Squarer body from '33, or earlier. I've included a pic of a '35 Buick, for comparison. I'll be curious to see if you guys agree that the Olds for '35 is a more handsome (and more modern looking) car than the Buick.

Oldsmobile_Special_4-Door_Sedan_1935.jpg

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Her's a '35 Buick (a beautiful car, in it's own right): 35-Buick_Series_40_Strt8-DV-07-HPA-01.jpg

Edited by Hudsy Wudsy (see edit history)
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Here, for whatever interest it may hold for you guys, is a couple pics of '34 LaSalles. Which, as I said earlier, may have been the first appearance of this particular body. You'll note that it still had a one piece windshield. If you have the time and interest, you might enjoy searching Google, Bing and Yahoo for other pics of '34 LaSalles. GMs lavish use of Art Deco styling motifs raises these cars to the level of period icons.

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Edited by Hudsy Wudsy (see edit history)
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