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Can anyone identify this chasis?


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Ol Dandy Dave is dumbfouded also. Early, yes. I reconize the Hartford friction shocks. Can you tell if it was right hand drive? Look to see where the steering box was mounted. The exhaust also looks like it had two inlets leading me to believe it was a large 4, or more likley, a 6 cylinder motor. How about an Olds Limited??? Dandy Dave!

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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Platform spring says quality and expensiv,,

Manifold says 4 cylender,,,40-50 Hp maybee,,size of a Packard 30 or larger,,

The 2 port manifold says 4 cyl,,the jugs would have been cast in pairs,,

Cross frame brackets to rear of manifold say it had separate transmission on those brackets,,,

The lamp irons are huge,,fenders are early,,

Full floating axle,,,again hi quality,,

Can someone see if those are ''Contental'' clincher rims??

My guess on year,,,07--10

All for now,,Ben

Edited by cben09 (see edit history)
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I remember seeing a T head Marmon up that way,,on a summer trip from Boston,,I was driving

a 1929 Packard,,Seems to me around Glenns Falls maybee,,This in around 1953,,,The Duzy was over in Carthage at Island Paper co,, along with a 4cyl Indian,,I was in High school,,,Cheers,,Ben

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RHD was very common. Ford and REO were the first large volume manufacturers to adopt LHD, in 1908 for Ford and (I think) 1909 or 10 for REO. Others did also, albeit gradually with the last holdouts being the big expensive cars that were expected to have paid drivers in any case. Rolls Royce of America used RHD from its inception in 1922 up to about late 1925 or early 1926 (The dates are known but I don't have them at hand).

I think that chassis is ca. 1906-1910 and was for a big, expensive car.

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Glad to hear that you are going to recover it. I picked a Stoddard Dayton chassies off of a Local farm back around 1983. It was in about the same condition but still had some of brass parts intact and sat in that same spot since at least 1939 or earlier. The motor, radiator, and transmission was scraped by a neighbor for the war effort in 1939. It was common at that time for the heavy parts to be taken for scrap and the chassies to be left behind. Sold it years ago because I could not locate an engine or transmission to put it back together. I can tell you that it is not a Stoddard Dayton. The Hartford Shocks were common on these early cars. The Stoddard Dayton Chassies also had them as many heavy early cars did. Dandy Dave!

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Right foot pedel, i beleive is brake. Wire or rod went back to round cast peice which then spans out to both drums. I beleive second picture is for hand brake which is missing rod that went across or back to that rear rod with cast round peice. allowing both inside and outside brakes to work. frame has a lot of curves in it. Both up and down and sideways. Ive been searching pictures for front and rear ends with righthand drive.

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Catskill, Don't kick yourself to hard about the pix, I think they are wonderful. Plus there are so many of them. Surprising no one has given a clue to identity. The front wheel gear was for the speedometer drive. The white tires you spoke of were probably gray when new. Definitely a high level auto appearing to be a 125 or plus wheelbase. The platform springing on the rear end is also indicative of a high end auto. The word will get out what it is! Thanks for the interesting post. --Bob

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Ok guys - keep in mind, that I'm new at this - I can search no more this week - I believe the most definitive trait is the rear suspension. It can have lots of the front characteristics, but if the rear cross-spring/suspension is not there - then it's not that make, period. So...

Based on the wizards of Carlisle1936 and 1937hd45, you have to focus on Cadillac. (Can somebody tell me another manufacturer that used that rear-style suspension?) I tried to look elsewhere at Oldsmobile, Rambler, Overland, Hudson, and Chalmers / Chalmers-Detroit but eliminated them because of the rear-spring / suspension. So if you look thru the 1909 - 1912 Cadillac, there are many strengths and traits that put this frame in that timeframe.

Chuck

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