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carlisle1926

1923 Dodge speedster

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Hi Fred,

Can you elaborate a bit on your "high speed ring gear". I am building an "A Model" Speedster and looking for ways to decrease the ratio. Nice job on the Speedster by the way.

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As for the alternator on the 292 being a dead giveaway as to it's modern lineage.... there is a single wire alternator disguised as a generator available for old timey hot rods. Definitely worth thinking about if you go that way. I've got a late 50's IHC 6 cylinder truck motor I've been eyeing up as well for the same reasons.

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Early 292's (and others ) had generators early on. As they converted to alternators they made use of the generator mounting points. So you could also get an earlier Generator bracket and mount a genny iff'n you wanted. That is the beauty of a Speedster, few rules and lots of creativity.

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This is my first post in some time now. I've managed to be pretty ill for most of this year, so not much was done on the speedster. I did find a nice rebuilt 1954 235 Chevrolet engine. I also found a 1954 Chevrolet cab over engine truck updraft carburetor intake/exhaust system. The updraft carburetor will help to make the 235 engine look a bit older than it is.

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Jason,

Sorry to hear you have been sick. Alot us us have been watching intently for your ingenious ideas. I am definitely going to steal your sight glass/ gas gauge idea!

I was wondering what your gas tank came off of? I recently purchased a very similar one, but the seller diid not know the origin.

Thanks,

Dwight

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Sorry to hear you have been out of circulation. I hope things continue to be better. Looking forward to your build progressing.

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Thanks. Someone in Canada had them made for his LaFrance speedster project, and they ended up too small! They are just the right size for the Buick. They are much higher quality than I could have afforded to have made. I don't care for the "distressed" look however. I am going to have to find out if I can dye the leather to get rid of that.

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Likewise sorry to hear of your illness, but glad to see things are getting back on track. We're all hoping to see this beast on the road soon.

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Here is the latest news on the speedster project. After months of no activity, I finally did a little work on the mess this past week. I found a 1915 Buick radiator and narrowed it 2-1/2" to fit inside the frame of my project. I painted it with black spray paint to keep the fresh welds from rusting. Then, I decided to work on hand making a cowl. As I was laying out the tools to work on the cowl, I got distracted by an ad on Craigslist for a guy selling a bunch of old cars. I went to look at a Graham project he had for sale and while talking to him, he said he had a 1916 Buick cowl in the weeds he wanted $40 for. Needless to say I bought the cowl. I will have to modify it a bit to make it work, but the cowl gives me a great start to the speedster body.

I decided to use a 1954 235 Chevrolet six that I had because it was cheap and easy to find parts for. I used the cross members out of a 1946 Chevrolet 1/2 ton frame to mount the 235 on. The Chevrolet cross members fit the Dodge frame with very little modification. So now the engine is resting in the frame with an updraft carburetor system off of a 1954 Chevrolet cab over engine truck. I extended the frame in the engine bay 9" using a section of frame cut from a 1946 Dodge one ton truck. The radius of the bends in the 46 truck frame matched the bends in the 23 Dodge frame. I mocked the car up again and took a few photos. Once the body is built and in place, I'll modify the American LaFrance hood to fit.

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Edited by carlisle1926 (see edit history)

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Also, since this car is really a massive pile of parts assembled from several different makes of cars, I decided it was time to start leaning in the direction that I want this car to be titled as when completed. I got to thinking about my heroes and people that have inspired me over the years. I'm not only a huge antique car nut, but I'm also an aviation nut. One of my idols who's life story is more amazing than any fiction writer could ever dream up, is that of Eddie Rickenbacker. The man was driving race cars in the turn of the century, a top ace as a World War One pilot, owned the Indianapolis Speedway, was in two horrific airplane crashes that should have killed him, survived being lost at sea in a raft for weeks, was the president of Eastern Airlines, and he partnered up with some guys and built the Rickenbacker cars. So, I decided this car was going to be titled as a Rickenbacker in honor of one of my heroes. No Rickenbacker car ever resembled the monstrosity that I'm putting together, but I don't think Mr. Rickenbacker would mind.

I found a radiator cloisonne and an I.D. plate on Ebay. Its a start.

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I"ll say... I was just admiring the "lived in " look of your garage ( that door leaning against the wall needs to be cut down a LOT to fit in your speedster though!) and checking out your filing system for parts. You didn't tell us you were an artist as well. Great concept.

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Oh my driveway certainly has the lived in look. I made a bit more progress this week. I started building the body. I have a lot more work to do on it, but at least the body is roughed in now. I also made my exhaust collector using an old 38" diameter oil storage tank that I cut down and shrank into a 7.5" diameter muffler. I made the exhaust outlet on the anvil.

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Great progress and exceptional drawings!

Do you really intend to put the e-brake and shifter outboard?

If you can figure out how, I will follow your lead.

Dwight

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Wow, nice anvil work on that outlet pipe, and I like the collector. That is turning into a cool build. That you for sharing. Where on earth did you acquire all of those airplane parts? That is a great pile of parts to pick from.

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I have the shifter mechanism off of a 1926 American LaFrance fire truck. I have to shorten the handles, but it should work. I'll be using a top loader 4 speed transmission from a 1950's Chevrolet. I'm modelling the system after the way a 1950's American Lafrance 700 series cab forward truck shifts using linkages to a remote shifter. I'll probably be mounting the transmission soon and then I'll begin making the shifter parts.

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For those that have asked, there is the majority of a disassembled AT-6 Texan airplane in the backyard. The parts are extremely corroded. I'll be putting the plane back together as a display to hang up. I cut up old junk aircraft and make replica WWII nose art pieces using the debris from aircraft that are doomed to go to China to be melted down. It beats letting it go to the smelters.

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The entire purpose of this project is to prove a reliable, and most of all, a CHEAP speedster can still be built. I had several other options for much older engines, but when I looked into the rebuild expense and the lack of parts availability, the decision was easy. I paid $150 for this recently rebuilt 235 engine that was pulled from a truck that was being hot rodded. I just don't feel comfortable going any long distance from home at high speeds with a 1920's engine. That sort of thing is for those with much deeper pockets than I. I've spent about $1500 so far during this build. But, I sold many of the unwanted NEW parts that came with the 235 as well as many of the original parts off of the Dodge chassis. I've sold about $2500 in odds and ends. So far, so good with the cheap build idea. But, yes, a 235 looks like garbage in there compared to an old T-head engine or flat head.

Edited by carlisle1926 (see edit history)

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