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scubaruskier

1988 Buick Reatta - One Owner Low Miles - $10000

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1988 Buick Reatta Coupe, sports car. Original, one-owner and garaged. Great condition. 24,XXX Miles. Multi-function, touch-screen computer. 16-way power seats. Fully power. Keyless Entry. A one-of-a-kind and rare car. This car is the first year it was produced. Asking $10,000 OBO.

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It is indeed a one of a kind '88 model if it has factory Remote Keyless Entry.

Edited by Ronnie (see edit history)

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What is the round ball looking thing mounted on the trunk lid?

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Re: 1988 Buick Reatta - One Owner Low Miles - $10000<!-- google_ad_section_end -->

<!-- google_ad_section_start -->Ronnie said "It is indeed a one of a kind '88 model if it has factory Remote Keyless Entry."

There were many "one of a kind" Reattas produced at the Craft Centre. The assembly process was designed to accommodate variations. Unfortunately the computers of the day lacked the capability to record all the variations accurately<!-- google_ad_section_end -->

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Re: 1988 Buick Reatta - One Owner Low Miles - $10000<!-- google_ad_section_end -->

<!-- google_ad_section_start -->Ronnie said "It is indeed a one of a kind '88 model if it has factory Remote Keyless Entry."

There were many "one of a kind" Reattas produced at the Craft Centre. The assembly process was designed to accommodate variations. Unfortunately the computers of the day lacked the capability to record all the variations accurately<!-- google_ad_section_end -->

I find it absurd to think that computers in 1988 didn't have the capability to keep accurate records.

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I find it absurd that Ronnie doesnt remember the shortage of "memory" in computers in the 1980s. Many "non standard" cars went out the door of the Craft Centre. The way the Reatta was built is one of the most interesting aspects of the model.

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Without fanning any flames of argument here, I would point out that GM's system of keeping track of vehicle options (and requisite build data) at the time was somewhat constricted by the fact that every thing on the car had to be accounted for by the entry of a code to represent each standard or optional feature. Body and interior color, seat finish (cloth, leather, vinyl) radio, suspension, engine and essentially everything else that needed to be known in advance to build the car were determined by a code.

If one looks at RPO code listings, often you will find ambiguous codes with like descriptions like "marketing option" or some such non-descriptive thing. There are also override codes that pertain to virtually any portion of the car. The 1988 select 60 code comes to mind - I think it was X22 - as one that at first glance doesn't jump out as anything significant unless you know the backstory.

Now, in order for an option or override to exist, someone at GM's IT dept. had to program a code to represent it for entry into the computer system. If a code didn't exist for some option or feature, it couldn't be added to the build data for a given vehicle. In such case, the only way to get something special done was to exercise some pull (twist some arms and drop some $, or be someone important enough to get an exception made). There are numerous examples of this known with the Reatta. One is the the Rivi-only cell phone option being installed at the factory, as was reportedly done for at least a couple of heavy-hitters who had a Reatta. Of course, that had an RPO code, but was only valid within the computer system for a Rivi. Some massaging of the system was undoubtedly done, and it is entirely possible the RPO sticker on these cars lacks any reference to this option being present as it was "not available" on the Reatta.

Keeping in mind that the Reatta, by virtue of it's unusual plant and build process, was a car uniquely suited to factory custom work done outside the lines, so to speak. It was also a car that Buick appears to have wanted to impress affluent buyers with, and so I suspect that extra lee-way was granted for special requests, provided the customer was willing to pay for them. That, or if the customer was perceived to be of some importance (i.e. a celebrity or high ranking GM exec) "non-authorized" (by the computer systems data entry anyway) was done as a "butt-kiss" move to satisfy a VIP.

Of course, after typing all that, I would point out that the car that is the subject of the OP could simply have had aftermarket keyless entry added, it certainly isn't that difficult to get done. This is a more plausible explanation than the factory putting RKE in on an 88, even if it was a late production unit. This would've required a lot of harness hacking - or the use of 1989 harnesses if they were available before the end of 88 production - making the car a nightmare to troubleshoot as it would be a mix of two model years electrical systems - and I have a hard time believing the factory would have done that.

I'd simply suggest that the question could be settled if the seller provide pictures of the remotes. If they are not factory units then that settles the issue. If they are factory RKE fobs, then at most it is still undetermined how the RKE system got into an 88.

KDirk

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As far as computers and memory: Ronnie remembers owning a Commodore VIC-20 computer with 5 kilobytes of memory in the early '80s. Yes, Kilobytes, not megabytes or gigabytes. The only storage device it had for saving data was a CASSETTE TAPE RECORDER! I wanted a program for my VIC that would save my checkbook information and reconcile it with my bank statement at the end of the month. Programs were scarce for the VIC. I had to write my own checkbook program in BASIC and save it to a cassette tape. When I used my program I had to type in LOAD to get the program into the VIC's memory and then type in RUN to start the program running.

That Commodore VIC-20, with 5K of memory, had the capability of recording all the data about a checkbook entry. It had input fields for payee, amount, date and memo and it recorded that data onto a cassette tape for later use. The program was able to retrieve that checkbook data and do calculations to reconcile the checkbook data at the end of the month. All that could be done on a $149.00 computer with 5 kilobytes of memory. I'm sure that same computer had the capability of having another input field to record whether or not my checkbook had a Remote Keyless Entry if needed. I stand by my statement about the capabilities of computers in 1988, regardless of any memory shortages that occurred, they were capable of recording that type of data accurately if the programmer chose to do so.

It's a shame that this thread had to get so far off topic because of a simple comment I made about me thinking an '88 model with factory RKE is rare. I didn't say it wasn't possible or didn't happen. To me it is "one of a kind" because I've never heard of one or seen one. To my knowledge no one else has stepped forward to say they have have an '88 model with RKE that was installed at the factory.

Edited by Ronnie (see edit history)

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Ronnie said,

"To my knowledge no one else has stepped forward to say they have have an '88 model with RKE that was installed at the factory."

We all know that the RKE became standard equipment in 1989. Is it so hard to believe that somebody at GM wanted to try the new hardware in an 88 model prior to it being installed in all the 89 models? If they installed this at the Craft Centre would it need to be removed prior to sale? The answer is of course not.

The idea that because any single forum member "hasen't seen it" doesn't mean that it doesn't exist. I currently have seven Reattas and have stripped about one car per week in the wrecking yards for about three years now. There are many variations our self proclaimed resident experts have not seen. The Craft Centre was designed to accomodate variations.<!-- google_ad_section_end -->

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Hi Ronny,

Sorry for the delay. The keyless entry is aftermarket. Either Viper or Cobra (can't remember off hand, but will verify). The ball on the hood is an attachment for a CB Radio antenna...also included.

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Thanks for posting and letting us know it is sold. It would be helpful to others if you would share the present mileage and selling price.

Without knowing what Reattas are actually selling for, it is difficult to price them.

Example, a 1990 Burgandy convertible sold in Houston with 27,000 for $8,000

Edited by Barney Eaton (see edit history)

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Example, a 1990 Burgandy convertible sold in Houston with 27,000 for $8,000

Wow - wish I'd seen this one! I occasionally check to see if there are any low mileage burgandy reattas out there... would love to have one some day.

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