Jump to content

Need help to identify year and model car that I would like to purchase.


Recommended Posts

Hi, new to the club and I am interested in making my first antique purchase. I'm hoping someone here may be able to identify a car that was shown in a 1937 RKO movie. The movie is titled "The man who found himself" and was on TCM channel a few days ago. The car seemed to be a 2 door trailing edge hinged" (suicide doors) convertible or roadster with rumble seat and a large "V" shaped grill. There seemed to be a hood ornament atop the nose of the hood plus another just above the grill on the hood nose and just below the upper ornament. I would love to find out the model and see in one is available on the market. Can anyone HELP?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi, new to the club and I am interested in making my first antique purchase. I'm hoping someone here may be able to identify a car that was shown in a 1937 RKO movie. The movie is titled "The man who found himself" and was on TCM channel a few days ago. The car seemed to be a 2 door trailing edge hinged" (suicide doors) convertible or roadster with rumble seat and a large "V" shaped grill. There seemed to be a hood ornament atop the nose of the hood plus another just above the grill on the hood nose and just below the upper ornament. I would love to find out the model and see in one is available on the market. Can anyone HELP?

Usually finding cars from movies is easy, you just look the movie up on imdb.com's car database ( IMCDb.org - Internet Movie Cars Database ). However that movie has not yet made the cut to be profiled on that site.

The description sounds very much like a 1936 Hudson. Is this the car? (click on the image for a larger picture)

post-30638-143139238886_thumb.jpg

post-30638-143139238876_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your help with my request. The Hudson is a great looking vehicle though not the one in the movie. No pic as there doesn't seem to be a video available for the movie and when I tried to record the TCM showing, It was short the car scene. However, there seems to be a multitude of great models that would satisfy my visual appetite. So, I may have to select another model and start hunting. Dave, thanks for the pic, the Hudson is real nice and link to IMCDB, where I can start my searching! The Brewster is nice not sure I have ever seen one.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Curti, Think you may have the answer! Great Looking model! Wonder if any are available and how they run in price compared to others? Don't think I can afford or really want a rare breed as I do want to drive it some in the Summer and I don't feel I want to do the show stuff. THANKS

Link to post
Share on other sites

RM auctions just sold a '36 Auburn convertible coupe at Hershey, I looked at the car and it was very nice and a driver. It sold for $137,500, with the buyers premium of 10%. There are other '35-'36s that may be sold a little cheaper with varying degrees of restorations.--Bob

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's an example of a Brewster Ford with the radical V shaped grille and wild fenders. This must be an old picture as you couldn't touch it for 70 G.

[TABLE]

<tbody>[TR]

[TD][TABLE=width: 1, align: center]

<tbody>[TR]

[TD]34fordbrewsterblue.jpg

Richard A. Wright

Striking syling of this '34 Brewster Ford V-8 Town Car. which belonged to the opera star Lilly Pons, marks it as a rare and distinguished automobile. The heart-shaped grille was a Brewster trademark. This elegant car drew a high bid of $70,000 at auction in Scottsdale, Ariz., but that was not enough for a sale.

[/TD]

[/TR]

</tbody>[/TABLE]

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD]dot.gif

<small>Copyright 2006

The Detroit News

</small>

[/TD]

[TD]<!-- AdSpace --><center><script></script><script></script><script></script><script></script></center><!-- /AdSpace -->[/TD]

[/TR]

</tbody>[/TABLE]

Link to post
Share on other sites

Although the Auburn is a great looking vehicle, I think it commands more dollars than I can put together. Also, I do not beleive the car in the movie had the side mounted spare, although, since I am sure it had a rumble seat, I don't know where else a spare could be located. When I stated it had a "V" shaped grill I meant it formed a "V" in the fore and aft direction. I do like the look of the Hudson and will see if that model will fit my budget. Thanks again for everyones efforts.

Link to post
Share on other sites

To my knowledge, Brewster, like Deitrich, Judkins, Vignale and the Fisher Bros., was not a vehicle manufacturer but built custom bodies only. What you must do, Prowler, ol' chap, is to find and rent the movie, then invite us all over for beer and pretzels to watch it with you. Then we can all agree on its I.D.! The trick these days for me is to find MYSELF in the pre-coffee morning hours!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Prowler, Check out a 32/33 Rockne. They were a base line of Studebaker and rumble seats were sold on the coupes. The grille appeared to be in a V until you are right up close. Tough car to find and restore. A friend used to have one. Had to use 34 Ford headlights cause he could not find a set, anyone wished to sell. Ron

Link to post
Share on other sites

The '34 Ford would certainly suit my requirements. Does it have roll up windows or is it a roadster? Is it suitable for outings of 20-60 miles in a day, say twenty times a year travelling at a maximum of 55 mph? <o:p</o

As to the rumble seat convertible being an appropriate starter car, unfortunately, I am at an age, having just past another ever accelerating year and birthday, that I don't feel I have the time to dedicate to project cars or time to wait to trade up to what one really wants to own. I wanted to limit the expenditure to $40K but I could stretch it further for the right vehicle if it were priced appropriately.

<o:p</o

My main concern is that I want to enjoy the car by using it for short local trips and not have the vehicle be a burden to me in any possible way. As such, something too rare would seem to be unwise in that regard. Although, I prefer that it to be as original as possible; and I would never authorize modifying or changing a classic car, for my intended use, I would not reject a candidate vehicle because it had been re-powered or had other "under the sheet metal" modifications.

As to the vehicle in the flick, the movie does not seem to be available on DVD or VHS. Would anyone know how to contact TCM to see if they could send out some still shots of the hitchhiking scene? To my memory, the car looked very much like the '34 Ford but there seemed to be several inches of space, above the top of the grill to the top of the hood line. In this space there seemed to be an emblem that spanned horizontally across the front of the hood, just above the grill and below the hood-top ornament.

Thanks again for everyone’s participation andall comments are appreciated! <o:p></o:p>

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree. A 1934 Ford in good condition will do 400 miles a day, day after day at 55 mph.

Easy to drive and even easier if you upgrade the steering box and replace the gear box with one from a 1939 model.

Brakes are mechanical and OK but can be upgraded with a "Floater" kit and they then become very good. Have a look at the video on the following web site.

Welcome to FlatheadTed.com<!-- google_ad_section_end -->

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 years later...

If the movie was shot in January and February 1937 the car was probably a 1937, or maybe a 1936 model. Unless they deliberately chose an older car to stress the owner's poverty or something.

 

You could do a web search for popular makes like 1937 Ford, Pontiac, Hudson, etc. If it was a real big car like a Cadillac you probably would have noticed. It might take 5 minutes, it might take an hour but chances are you will find something that clicks.

 

Later ... the suicide doors make it sound more like a 1934 than 1937. You might look at older models back to 1933.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

And the original questioner hasn't been on

our forum for 5 years!  If there's an interesting

conversation to be had, a new thread would be

a good idea.

 

But we really like old things!! 

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...