Ian_Greenlaw

1934 Dodge Full Body Off Restoration

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

"Looks like a pearl white, looks good but I am not sure how that red mirror is going to go with the rest of the car"

This is just a two pack priming colour he uses which he can sand back to remove any high / flat spots.

I thought the mirror would look good hanging off the dodge ! hahaha..... Its from an Alfa Romeo GTV he's also doing some work on.

Maybe I should know this but I cant remember, what was the original color scheme and do you plan to use this, in my opinion this is the way to go in most cases.

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Ian, you do know Jason was just kidding you? At least I hope so or they have sure got problems in his paintshop! (chuckle)

Ray.

Edited by R.White (see edit history)

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Just my 2 cents worth again. All our old antique vehicles were built using 18 gauge steel. This is why you can literally stand on a front fender of say a '33 Dodge and not bend it. Vehicles today are made mostly with 24 gauge which can bent by hand. I once replaced a front fender on a Toyota Celica and just took the old one and folded it up in to a 'package' about 12"X12" and threw in my shop garbage can! Also our old stuff used virgin steel. It was the 1st time that the metal in our vehicles was used. Today we are driving dishwashers,clothes dryers,refrigerators and God knows what. And it has all rusted before. It appears that once rusted ,steel will rust quicker the next time it's used. Just my opinion.

The material used in any roof assembly I've come across was horse hair. It filled out the roof and took away any creases. It was also used to fill out the seats. Most of the glue used in our cars was hot melt horse glue. It was made I believe by rendering horse hooves at the 'glue factory'. Upholstery shops etc. used to keep a pot of hot horse glue with a hard wood stick or two in it. I believe they used to use the hairs from a horse's tail for violin strings. I've read in a book on the company that made my van in 1935 that they still had 60 horses in 'delivery' in 1935,down from 300, still working the streets of Toronto. I think we forget the horse was still very much around when our cars and trucks were on the road new. At the end of WWII because of gas shortages 80% of German road transport was done with horses.

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...I believe they used to use the hairs from a horse's tail for violin strings.... .

Very close. It was for the violin (and other string instrument) bows. :cool:

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Just my 2 cents worth again. All our old antique vehicles were built using 18 gauge steel. This is why you can literally stand on a front fender of say a '33 Dodge and not bend it. Vehicles today are made mostly with 24 gauge which can bent by hand. I once replaced a front fender on a Toyota Celica and just took the old one and folded it up in to a 'package' about 12"X12" and threw in my shop garbage can! Also our old stuff used virgin steel. It was the 1st time that the metal in our vehicles was used. Today we are driving dishwashers,clothes dryers,refrigerators and God knows what. And it has all rusted before. It appears that once rusted ,steel will rust quicker the next time it's used. Just my opinion.

The material used in any roof assembly I've come across was horse hair. It filled out the roof and took away any creases. It was also used to fill out the seats. Most of the glue used in our cars was hot melt horse glue. It was made I believe by rendering horse hooves at the 'glue factory'. Upholstery shops etc. used to keep a pot of hot horse glue with a hard wood stick or two in it. I believe they used to use the hairs from a horse's tail for violin strings. I've read in a book on the company that made my van in 1935 that they still had 60 horses in 'delivery' in 1935,down from 300, still working the streets of Toronto. I think we forget the horse was still very much around when our cars and trucks were on the road new. At the end of WWII because of gas shortages 80% of German road transport was done with horses.

If that was an OEM fender than you aint seen nuthin yet, get ahold of an aftermarket non capa certified and suddenly you turn into Superman

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Just my 2 cents worth again. All our old antique vehicles were built using 18 gauge steel. This is why you can literally stand on a front fender of say a '33 Dodge and not bend it. Vehicles today are made mostly with 24 gauge which can bent by hand. I once replaced a front fender on a Toyota Celica and just took the old one and folded it up in to a 'package' about 12"X12" and threw in my shop garbage can! Also our old stuff used virgin steel. It was the 1st time that the metal in our vehicles was used. Today we are driving dishwashers,clothes dryers,refrigerators and God knows what. And it has all rusted before. It appears that once rusted ,steel will rust quicker the next time it's used. Just my opinion.

The material used in any roof assembly I've come across was horse hair. It filled out the roof and took away any creases. It was also used to fill out the seats. Most of the glue used in our cars was hot melt horse glue. It was made I believe by rendering horse hooves at the 'glue factory'. Upholstery shops etc. used to keep a pot of hot horse glue with a hard wood stick or two in it. I believe they used to use the hairs from a horse's tail for violin strings. I've read in a book on the company that made my van in 1935 that they still had 60 horses in 'delivery' in 1935,down from 300, still working the streets of Toronto. I think we forget the horse was still very much around when our cars and trucks were on the road new. At the end of WWII because of gas shortages 80% of German road transport was done with horses.

Poor Horses....Thousands of horses abandoned by owners last year - Nature - Environment - The Independent

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Hi Guys,

The original colour was Empire Maroon and there were different options available i.e. black guards, body colour on the wheels or black wheels etc... even the stripe could have either been Packard Ivory or Silver Bronze. I am going for a Maroon but perhaps a little richer ( almost like a Red Wine in a glass ). The guards will be black and I'm tossing up with the stripe. I've seen Dodges with pinstriping above and below the the main line through the body and I've seen them with the entire main line painted which does look smart I must admit. Heres a few pics to show you what I mean. The first is a Richards Body and the car is in South Australia. See the wide stripe. The second is Ken Sobels car in the USA and he has the pinstriping. I'm still thinking about the pin striping whether if it detracts from the natural curves of the body or enhances it. A single stripe as in the first two pics is clean and neat and on a darker colour car may be enough.

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My favourite colour is pearlescent Burgundy which I think would suit your car if you are thinking of straying from maroon. Jason will be able to confirm if there is a problem or not but I have found quite a few maroon finished cars suffer from exposure to strong sunlight. I know I have said it before but in my view the '34 has beautiful styling and with a chrome rad surround it looks just right; you couldn't find a nicer DB to restore. As to the pinstripe - I think it depends on whether you want to line out the wings, etc then perhaps two stripes on the body. I think I prefer the more restrained single stripe leaving out the further stripes but of course it's what ever you choose to do. I'm sure it will look great whatever you decide.

Ray

Edited by R.White (see edit history)

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My favourite colour is pearlescent Burgundy which I think would suit your car if you are thinking of straying from maroon. Jason will be able to confirm if there is a problem or not but I have found quite a few maroon finished cars suffer from exposure to strong sunlight. I know I have said it before but in my view the '34 has beautiful styling and with a chrome rad surround it looks just right; you couldn't find a nicer DB to restore. As to the pinstripe - I think it depends on whether you want to line out the wings, etc then perhaps two stripes on the body. I think I prefer the more restrained single stripe leaving out the further stripes but of course it's what ever you choose to do. I'm sure it will look great whatever you decide.

Ray

Any dark colors are going to age faster than lighter more reflective colors, if its going to be a dark color make sure the body is straight cause it will shop up every little flaw or wave.

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Good advice there, Jason. Don't know about you but I don't like painting black. You think every thing is straight but then you notice something's got missed. It always seems to take longer to do a black car but then I'm only an amateur - not bad -but not professional.

Ray.

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Just a bit of an update. The radiator surround has been painted as well as the steering tube. The interior has also been painted with a sound deadening paint. Next week he'll rub back the body again and get it ready for base coats.

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Looks first rate Ian, whats the large hole in the front section looks to be under drivers seat, looks like a tool box area, also the round vent in the rear portion of floorboard?

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very nice work , have a 34 sedan in backyard that is to much missing to build ,

Jen

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Hi Jason,

the hole in the front is under the drivers seat, where the battery is. Sorry, no tool box.

the round one in the rear, which you can see the floor grate through, is right above the diff. I think with a severe bump the diff hit the floor so a hole was cut and canvas filled it in so it wouldn't dint the floor. Either that or it's just an inspection port for the diff.

Ian

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Hi Jason,

the hole in the front is under the drivers seat, where the battery is. Sorry, no tool box.

the round one in the rear, which you can see the floor grate through, is right above the diff. I think with a severe bump the diff hit the floor so a hole was cut and canvas filled it in so it wouldn't dint the floor. Either that or it's just an inspection port for the diff.

Ian

Looks to me like the hole runs from side to side the entire width of car, is your battery that big?

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I thought it was where a section of floor had been removed for replacement.

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I thought it was where a section of floor had been removed for replacement.

Is there supposed to be a wood insert there, I dont think so but I guess I could be wrong

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The first large hole at the front under the instrument panel has the metal toe board and this is joined to a wooden floor insert. The second hole ( on its own ) is covered in by a second floor board. I've attached a picture of the original floor board and I'm currently working on a new one. It does have a cut out for the battery but no and a set of holes on each side there the front seatmounts to. This is the original floor insert. There is also one more piece but thats at the rear of the car for a "shelf" behind the rear seat.

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Hi Jason,

the hole in the front is under the drivers seat, where the battery is. Sorry, no tool box.

the round one in the rear, which you can see the floor grate through, is right above the diff. I think with a severe bump the diff hit the floor so a hole was cut and canvas filled it in so it wouldn't dint the floor. Either that or it's just an inspection port for the diff.

Ian

I would be concerned with exhaust fumes coming up through that vent and filling the cabin, not sure why someone chose a vent I guess

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Hi Jason,

The photo with what looks like a vent in the floor is actually the floor of the spray booth and not part of my car. Looking at the photo it sure does look like its welded to the car, even the lines align up so it looks like its part of it. Pretty good shot huh !

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Hi Jason,

The photo with what looks like a vent in the floor is actually the floor of the spray booth and not part of my car. Looking at the photo it sure does look like its welded to the car, even the lines align up so it looks like its part of it. Pretty good shot huh !

Oh I see it now

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Very nice work ... and a very nice car. I will be following your progress till it is finished. Keep it up!

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Bit more progress. The first four pics is the Body just being finished off and he's now down to 800 grit paper. Smooth as a baby's bum ! The last two pics is the completed body which is being sprayed this week. He sent me a pic on my phone this morning of the dash board thats been painted. Nice.

Cheers

Ian

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