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I have been preaching this for years, and it seems that many of the clubs are suffering from the same problem. If the hobby is going to survive, it will need members like this guy !!!!
I think you are the "one who shall not be named" Whoops, I did it. The author brings up a good point-if the car is too rare or nice to be driven maybe it's time to be in a museum
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I strongly concur with the author, but sometimes I wonder if some "trailer people" rise to that level of things just to be a part of that culture? Certainly, if you've spent lots of time and money to get a car "clean" and correctly-done (at whatever level of execution from stock to "otherwise"), pains-takingly cleaning things after each weekend drive might suddenly NOT be an option, so spend some bigger bucks for the trailer and a tow vehicle. Granted, though, there ARE some vehicle worthy of being pampered in an enclosed trailer.

Still, as 5563, old-tank, and others have done, you CAN restore a vehicle to "end of the assembly line" correctness AND still drive them cross country to meets and such, without incurring too much degradation of the vehicle in the process . . . not countin' for some ignorant drivers in the process. AND I believe there are "some liberties" which would make the show-ready cleaning easier to accomplish without hurting the show quality of the vehicle (NOT "liberties" as radial tires, halogen headlights, etc.). Learning some of these "tricks" is ONE benefit of forums and networks as we're now in!

There are plusses for each orientation AND vehicles which can be worthy of each situation, too. How everybodys' individual "planets are aligned, and when" can determine which is most appropriate for each individual and their vehicle(s).

Enjoy!

NTX5467

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That article was well written and covered many bases. For years when I was showing my 67 Riv GS at various nationals and regionals I always drove it. Silly me, I didn't know any better and never gave it a second thought because I had no money to own a trailer let alone a truck reliable enough for long distance towing. Any extra money I had went into the car.

Once at the shows and getting my car cleaned up it was not uncommon to have folks tell me I was crazy for driving such a nice car instead of trailering it. It struck me as odd because if I never even considered trailering. If I didn't drive the car, how else would it get to the show.

After years of politely turning my nose up at those who trailer (especially for 60s era Buicks that are so reliable and comfortable) I do understand that there are very legitimate reasons why people must trailer and I could end up one day doing it myself; although for now the saying I've used for years still holds. "The day I put the car on a trailer for a show is the day I may as well put a for sale sign on it".

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I both trailer and drive (within reason) and my 39 Chevy PU (AACA Senior) is my daily driver for breakfast car. Can someone please explain to me why the folks that choose not to trailer seem to be so preoccupied with those that do. I can't remember ever reading any posts by the trailer folks that dwell on the driver folks and how they are missing the joys of trailering. And make no mistake, trailering is actually fun and adds another whole layer of adventure to any trip. For every story about someone's "driving" adventure/misadventure there is a matching trailer centered story.

So the next time I'm enjoying the sound of my big Dodge diesel and feeling the tug of the trailer behind me I'll look over at the guy motoring along in some vintage car and I'll wave and wish him well. I won't waste a second wondering why he's screwing up by not trailering.......................Bob

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Please pardon me for speaking out of observation, not experience. For only a brief period, I had a car that approached show-worthiness, although as a well-kept survivor, not as a product of a hard earned restoration. At the time, in the early 1980s, I don't remember anyone in the local hobby having an enclosed trailer, with which to tow their special car to shows. Everyone drove them, from a Stanley Steamer, to a V12 Auburn, to a Cosmopolitan convertible, to a stunning original '59 Eldorado Seville. Hours of pre-judging detailing were not then normal - most everyone just pulled onto the show field, once-overed their car with a chamois, and set to visiting.

One major collector in town, who did not enjoy driving his many immaculate old cars on public roads, kept them in a climate controlled warehouse. He enjoyed the company of other hobbyists by regularly inviting car clubs to tour his collection. We rarely heard the cars run and were urged not to open doors or hoods. However, no one in my experience denigrated this man or his manner of enjoying his cars. We felt enriched by his acts of sharing, on his own terms. When he died, too young, his cars were widely dispersed. I suppose that some of them are now being regularly driven, some got squirrelled away in other static collections, and others may be roaming the countryside in enclosed trailers.

That's a point to remember in this discussion: we are all temporary custodians of our unique cars. Some were built long before we were born and hopefully most will be enjoyed by other owners, long after each of us is gone. It happens that, demographically, Baby Boomers in their 60s and 70s are currently caring for the best of the best. Some of them (and their spouses) are getting too old to enjoy long road trips, without the creature comforts that a modern tow vehicle offers. As the cars are carried from show to show, gathering awards, they are incrementally slipping in points status and will eventually be eclipsed by other even more perfect restorations. They might then be sold as "Tour Ready" and be seen on the roads, after all.

Meanwhile, though, these cars are helping to expand their owners' circle of friends, at a time in their lives when their contemporaries have limited themselves to a favourite golf course and a big screen TV. Let's not let the Trailer/Non-Trailer difference divide us as hobbyists, any more than we would avoid a friendship with a car owner who paid for a professional restoration, just because we like to - and are still able to - do most of our own work. We learn so much about the art and science of special cars from each other and "Early 'Boomers" have the most to share.

Old cars are the introduction; meeting old car people is the real benefit.

Edited by Rob McDonald (see edit history)
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I strongly concur with the author, but sometimes I wonder if some "trailer people" rise to that level of things just to be a part of that culture?

NTX5467

Exactly the issue. It's become a hobby culture unto it's own. All except a few CCCA Full Classics were "just" old cars up until the speculation boom years of the late 1980's. THEN, all the sudden there was "money in them thar hills" as the Gold Rush slogan goes.

Then an additional value was placed on certain cars and the pendulum swung to make these cars "too expensive to fail" - borrowing another slogan.

Where this crowd came from that found it so fascinating to hand a car over to a renowned restoration shop with a blank check, I have some idea. It was the baby boomer crowd that felt entitled to such a car from working so hard for so long. Mechanicals got more complicated, costs to restore reflected the boom of the hobby from 1985 to 2000ish, and suddenly these was too much at stake to risk driving it or trying some of the restoration on your own.

We became a 2 car garage country, then a 3 car garage country and the wive's, once OK with the husband tearing into a Buick in the garage at the expense of comfort and neighborhood wonderment, was now appalled at such goings-on but perfectly OK with shipping the car off or buying one already done.

My personal belief is that if the car can achieve safe levels of travel then consider driving it. Pete Phillips once wrote that the 1936 Buick was probably the 1st Buick to be "highway worthy" with enough speed, modern hydraulic brakes and comfort to be driven accordingly.

I think it's fair to consider caravan-ing (sp) an older Buick but then driving it in and around a meet. For those who own 1936 to modern Buicks, I would drive them. If you feel the car is too valuable or rare, such as a 53-54 Buick Skylark, of course that's your call, but I would still say drive it.

Please remember this forum is for opinions, and that's all mine are. With some historical insight.

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One thing i thought of since I posted it, I don't see too many people on the forum with trailer cars or senior cars, I am on to something. Technology lacking, maybe or only a detail person, not a mechanic inclined. just some other thoughts

Well stated. I know some folks from this crowd, one is a friend of mine from Boone, Iowa that had a Doug Seybold restoration, has never been on the forum, and did take his 90 series 1940 Buick to the Ames National meet (he drove it, but it was only 15 miles) but would probably trailer it to a further meet.

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Still no answer to why this preoccupation with telling folks who trailer they "REALLY should be driving" their cars. I mean what's up with that? Why is it even a subject of discussion? It's like if some guy that only trailered started kvetching about folks driving cars that REALLY shouldn't be driven because there are not too many left and they are being ruined by driving them. And what's with this "trailer culture" thing. Were did that come from?

OK, here's why folks trailer their cars to shows. Now listen up. After you have spent 3000 hours restoring your car you wish to keep it that way. After you have spent 2 full days detailing your car for a show you wish to keep it that way FOR the show. After you have had a gravel truck pass you at 70 MPH spewing s**t all over the road you don't want to do it again. After you have gotten up 6 times a night to look out of a motel window at your car because there is a crack dealer with a steady stream of customers two doors down you wish it were safely tucked away in a trailer in a guarded area. After you have driven home from the show you find a stone chipped headlight which just as easily could have been your unobtainium wind shield.

So now you know why some folks decide not to turn a lovingly restored car into just another used car. I'll continue to enjoy my cars by taking them on local drives in good weather and loading them on my locked and secure trailer for shows more than a hour away. Now that everyone knows why cars are, and will continue to be, "trailer queens" perhaps there will be less concern about what others do with their cars. And I promise to not scold others for ruining an irreplaceable treasure by (gasp) driving it. Cheers...........................Bob

Edited by Bhigdog (see edit history)
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I refurbished my car fourteen years ago. It is not a number one car. It has seen limited good weather driving. It has never been caught in the rain. Each time it was driven it was cleaned and covered in my garage. I've recently disassembled the car for another repaint. I found quite a lot of dirt under the trim. The interior was removed and the was a lot of dirt behind the panels. I expected to find some dirt. I was surprised to find as much as I did. I would never fault someone for using a trailer. I understand completely why they are used.

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One area where vehicles must be trailered, which also might explain why I made the "culture" comment, is full-blown race cars. For that class of vehicle, trailering is the only option to legally get it from the residence to the race track and back.

Trailered cars (and related tow equipment) can be considered "a luxury item" of sorts for many people, so having a trailer towing rig is an upscale thing to have. Perhaps NOT of necessity or convenience specifically, but a reason to look like you're "running with the big dogs", so to speak . . . with all respect to our bhigdog. It's like owning a Mercedes says things about the owner and their particular station in life. For these people, having a car trailer and suitable tow vehicle is their "buy-in" to this situation, which THEY consider upscale and such. Part of a culture they seem to desire to be a part of, within the vehicle hobby.

NOW, I also fully understand the perils of driving on surface streets and highways. The issue of "debris" in the roadway and kicked-up by passing vehicles. Not to forget the ultimate fear of another driver doing something which might result in damage to my driven vehicle . . . by whatever actions they might have done. Then the possible angst of ME having to look for suitable repair parts in the end, to get things repaired as they need to be. Certainly, THIS is why each driven vehicle should have plenty of insurance on their vehicle . . . from a company that is involved in the vintage vehicle hobby AND an agent who's sensitive to the particular needs of our vehicular situations. Certainly, the more-recent "agreed value" coverage is much better than prior options, but that also means you "take the money and run" rather than trying to resurrect a vehicle you've had a nice relationship with (see the other thread!), that's more like a part of the family than "just a car".

And, in many states, there is the issue of "weather". I was at a Great Race event in Irving, TX in the 1990s. Suddenly, the cars on the show field started to leave. I overheard a comment that there was bad weather coming in from the northwest of us. The cars were moved to the parking garage at the over-night hotel, in case of hail. A few hours later, I was in Dallas when the rain came. At one time, I thought I was going to have to teach my '77 Camaro to swim . . . I would have hated to be in the same situation with an older vehicle, even if it was capable of a coast-to-coast trek! Certainly, some of the "high wheelers" would have been better capable to ease through the high water, but lack of better weather-sealing of the passenger compartment might not be fun to deal with, I suspect.

Each of us have our own orientations and sensitivities in trailer use or non-use. Just as there can be compelling reasons to be married or single, there are similar compelling reasons "to trailer or not to trailer". Each one has its own benefits and detractions . . . just depends upon which set of benefits you might desire to have. Or perhaps a blending depending upon how far from home the event might be.

Regards,

NTX5467

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Although I agree overall with the writer's observations, the conclusions do not apply to all parts of the collector car hobby.

Because all my cars are prewar cars (three of them are pre-WW1), I have two trailers to transport my cars to events. Although I drove my 1924 truck over 180 miles to the BCA National in Bellevue WA, I often cannot safely drive my cars to events far away. That car and several others went on to drive in the PreWar AfterTour immediately after that meet. That year, we drove from Bellevue to Anacortes and boarded ferries each day to tour several island in Puget Sound. This is what the BCA PreWar Division does.... We encourage everyone to drive their collector cars, and have promoted this since we became a division of the BCA.

Those that know me also know that I do not enter my cars for judging. I have said many times: "If I were a judge at a car show, I would add points for bugs on the windshields of all the cars that were driven to the show". Maybe this would help solve this perceived problem. There is much more to this hobby than judged shows. I believe you can have much more fun with your car if you drive it to enjoy the same experience others had "way back when".

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One area where vehicles must be trailered, which also might explain why I made the "culture" comment, is full-blown race cars. For that class of vehicle, trailering is the only option to legally get it from the residence to the race track and back.

Trailered cars (and related tow equipment) can be considered "a luxury item" of sorts for many people, so having a trailer towing rig is an upscale thing to have. Perhaps NOT of necessity or convenience specifically, but a reason to look like you're "running with the big dogs", so to speak . . . with all respect to our bhigdog. It's like owning a Mercedes says things about the owner and their particular station in life. For these people, having a car trailer and suitable tow vehicle is their "buy-in" to this situation, which THEY consider upscale and such. Part of a culture they seem to desire to be a part of, within the vehicle hobby.

NOW, I also fully understand the perils of driving on surface streets and highways. The issue of "debris" in the roadway and kicked-up by passing vehicles. Not to forget the ultimate fear of another driver doing something which might result in damage to my driven vehicle . . . by whatever actions they might have done. Then the possible angst of ME having to look for suitable repair parts in the end, to get things repaired as they need to be. Certainly, THIS is why each driven vehicle should have plenty of insurance on their vehicle . . . from a company that is involved in the vintage vehicle hobby AND an agent who's sensitive to the particular needs of our vehicular situations. Certainly, the more-recent "agreed value" coverage is much better than prior options, but that also means you "take the money and run" rather than trying to resurrect a vehicle you've had a nice relationship with (see the other thread!), that's more like a part of the family than "just a car".

And, in many states, there is the issue of "weather". I was at a Great Race event in Irving, TX in the 1990s. Suddenly, the cars on the show field started to leave. I overheard a comment that there was bad weather coming in from the northwest of us. The cars were moved to the parking garage at the over-night hotel, in case of hail. A few hours later, I was in Dallas when the rain came. At one time, I thought I was going to have to teach my '77 Camaro to swim . . . I would have hated to be in the same situation with an older vehicle, even if it was capable of a coast-to-coast trek! Certainly, some of the "high wheelers" would have been better capable to ease through the high water, but lack of better weather-sealing of the passenger compartment might not be fun to deal with, I suspect.

Each of us have our own orientations and sensitivities in trailer use or non-use. Just as there can be compelling reasons to be married or single, there are similar compelling reasons "to trailer or not to trailer". Each one has its own benefits and detractions . . . just depends upon which set of benefits you might desire to have. Or perhaps a blending depending upon how far from home the event might be.

Regards,

NTX5467

Very eloquent, as usual. That said, the trailer culture thingy comes as complete surprise to me. My trailer is a second hand Haulmark that I consider a rolling garage, no more no less. I assure you there is very little trailer envy going around.

Still waiting here for a cogent explanation for the whining and hand wringing vis-a-vis trailering that would drive a magazine writer to actually write a column about it and why it would find simpatico readers. How about it? Not being contentious, I'm genuinely intrigued.............Bob

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My 2 cents on an old continuing discussion: Apparently to some if you trailer a vehicle for whatever reason some consider it snobby, unnecessary, ridiculous, not good for the hobby, not part of the hobby, being a showoff, etc. Most never spent thousands of hours restoring a vehicle (or multiple vehicles) themselves as you and many others have done.

It is easy making a perfect vehicle to a driver however impossible to take a driver to a perfect vehicle. If your enjoyment is restoring to perfect, again good for you however that too is frowned on by some. My antique insurance policy states that the vehicle must be in a secured lockable place overnight.

Personally I find a trailer handy when traveling especially for tours far from home. Lots of room for spare parts and luggage and you’re not driving an old vehicle on a interstate and one that may have a top speed of 50 (dangerous). Get there, unload and have fun. I have brough a few back with broken suspensions on the trailer.

There is room in this hobby for all: tin can or no tin can.

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Agreed! Joe, I thought of you on my trip to Charlotte in my trusty 68 GS 400. Drove like a champ. I even got caught in some storms on the way back. I sold my truck so I can't tow a trailer anymore :rolleyes:

Is that an attempt to cut down on future purchases? :)

I prefer to drive my cars...but can certainly understand the desire to protect a large investment by trailering to a show. Also, pre-war cars going long distances certainly qualifies as prudent as well. A time-crunch could be a reason as well. It can be quite an event to break down, even if it's a small problem, depending on where you are at in relation to help. Newer cars/trucks CAN be more reliable for a quick trip to a show and back where losing time to a break down would be a deal breaker.

I'd like to add "My car has never seen rain" to the list of strange comments. I've seen this in for sale ads from second and third owners???

Maybe it's because all my cars are drivers, but I don't see the point. Does this mean the car has never been washed either? I didn't realize rain was so destructive. Again, maybe this only applies to perfect 400 point cars, of which I will likely never own?

Of course, I live in the rust belt, where the cars seemingly rust just sitting inside a closed garage...

Edited by bhclark (see edit history)
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Brian, I think the "never seen rain" comment is supposed to imply how cared-for the vehicle was, or how many "pains" the owner took with keeping the car "nice". Kind of like "never sat outside at night", which would imply a more upscale residential situation, I suspect. Be that as it may . . .

Perhaps the car couldn't "see" the rain as the owner put some towels to cover the headlights?

To each their own . . .

Enjoy!

NTX5467

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One of Joe T's "concerns" about the trailer crowd is the practice of trailering their over restored show car to a National meet simply to get an award. They trailer to the event, unload, take the vehicle to the show field, place "Don't Touch This" signs in it, and wait for the judging and banquet, grab their Gold, load up and you never hear from them again.

They don't go to chapter meetings, regionals, or otherwise participate. While the club outlines allow this practice, I hope you can see that that's not the intent of the "mutual interest" club we belong to. I think Joe is saying that where a BCA National was once a reunion of the members from all over the country, it slowly became over-run with "one time only" trailer queens, to win an award and then to be seen again.

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Using terms like "trailer Queen" , "trailer crowd", "over restored show car" , "gather their gold" and "over run" in such a negative manner is astounding. I had no idea the chasm between those who choose to trailer and those who don't was so wide. So what's driving this rift? Envy, pride, greed, sloth, some other deadly sin on either side of the equation or something else. Come on out with it. Civil discourse is healthy..........Bob

Edited by Bhigdog (see edit history)
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I can understand the problems with the terms, but that is not what My problem is . The old car hobby started with people getting together to enjoy their cars. Through the years the "hobby" has evolved into something entirely different.

In the BCA all the emphasis on the cars is reserved for the 400 point vehicles. The driven cars are given their medallions on the field and are treated like second class members. These are the cars that are drivn to the meet ,and the ones that are the promoters of the club. I have some friends that trailer their cars and they are the exceptions to the rule , as they come to all the meetings and enjoy the tours.

As Bryan stated , most of the members that "go for the gold" are members in name only

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I think there will always be a certain amount of tension between different segments of the club (disclaimer, I was a member for a number of years but am not now for non political reasons). There are those who are natural "joiners" and others who are members for other than social reasons. Many "go for the gold" because winning an award is a validation of their hard work, not a trophy in the sense that they are somehow better. Many others are unable or uninterested in 400 point restorations and just want to hang out. Others find modified or later/earlier models uninteresting. Many belong to the national club for the benefits it provides but are too busy or uninterested in local clubs. Some love the history behind the marque others couldn't give a s**t. Most members are a combination of the above. A well managed club will do all it can to attract and hold the interest of the different segments. If that is not happening blaming one segment or the other for a perceived problem and painting it with insulting generalizations is not going to help...............................Bob

Edited by Bhigdog (see edit history)
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I agree a well put statement. I have tried to stay on the fence in past trailer crowd v driver threads because from my standpoint, the guys that shoot for 400 points are bringing cars up to a level for the future, a stewardship position. However, I would suggest but have no proof except anecdotal - that a lot of trailer queens are restored by shops rather then the owners. I say this because I have actual proof of running into hundreds of baby boomers who openly admit they bought the car that way and did not do the restoration.

Maybe you did your cars restorations, but my good friend D.P. handed his 1940 Buick series 90 over to Doug Seybold and with the technology of better paints, polishes, fit, parts etc to "create" a 400 point winning vehicle. D. P. never got his hands greasy at all. He showed it at the Ames National meet and I doubt he will ever show it at a National again.

As I have pointed out already, few folks are doing restorations in their garages anymore, for many good reasons (time / space/ mess / cost). It's not necessarily envy or perception of greed (for me), I know my budget and I can't afford a $100,000 restoration so I drive and restore what I can afford. Don't begrudge those that are in the Pebble Beach crowd. I just believe that it's not cool to bring a car that's obviously over-restored to a National, one that you simply handed a blank check to a restorer, for the purpose of a trophy - and - as Joe has pointed out before, so that some people who may not know entirely what they are doing judge it to be a 400 point car.

I have seen National meet show field cars loaded up in their trailers 20 minutes after judging. I have been told to back away from a car when I was leaning over to look at the engine compartment.

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Digesting all the comments, I don't detect anyone is adamantly opposing trailers. Just more less personal opinions. Nice and civil. Post #23 lists some legitimate reasons one might trailer. Some other comments highlighted examples of where the reason for trailering might be a little overboard to the average Buick meet attendee. Here are a few just for FUN:o.

  • If you arrive at the meet two days prior to show day but don't take your car out of the trailer until 1 hour before show starts; you might be too fussy
  • If you do take your car out of the trailer but put it back in each night; you might be too fussy
  • If you have your turbo diesel tow rig idling ready to load your car immediately when judging ends; you might be too fussy
  • If you get irate and upset because your trailered car didn't get a gold senior but a driven car beside you did; you might be too fussy
  • If you get irate because you arrived at the meet on show day but there is no place to park your 24' enclosed trailer; you might be too fussy
  • If on the drive home pulling your trailered car that didn't win gold and your family finds you unbearable to be with; you might be too fussy.
  • If your trailered car wins gold senior and that is all you can talk about to your friends when you get home from a 4 day meet; you might be too fussy

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Or..................

If you arrive two days early and you repeatedly take your car out of the trailer hoping someone will come by to BS: You might be OK

If you take your car out of the trailer and put it away at night because that's where your car goes: You might be OK

If you put your car away after the show because you're burned out with BSing: You might be OK

If you get irate and upset because the trailered car beside you got a Gold and your driver didn't: You might need more work on your car

If you arrive late and can't find trailer parking; You might be victim of your own poor planning

If on the drive home you are unbearable because your trailered car did not get Gold: (See #4 above)

If your trailered or driven car wins Gold and that's all you can talk about to your friends; You might need to get a real life

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Or…………………. after driving 600 miles to a show / tour you pull your highly detailed car out of the trailer at the hotel in the rain so you can take your rig 100 miles (one way) to go get a friend’s car that broke down on the way to the event. A friend who no longer questions why you have a trailer especially since he is always borrowing tools and parts to keep his car going.

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I am a fan of driving and even drive my 29 regularly around the area. In fact I can barely start it and back it out of the garage without taking it on a few mile excersize run. That said, I plan on doing some touring with it and hope to be able to take it on some of the prewar after tours when time and money allow. I will trailer it to any location over 150 or 200 miles away for practical reasons, it is not fast on the road, parts for this car are getting harder and harder to find and while not putting a lot of wear on them staying close to home driving long distances to a tour, then on a tour and back home again will be a strain for any 80+ year old car. However by the time I am ready to do some serious tours with this car I hope to Have my 1965 GMC short box pickup ready to be the tow vehicle so will still be driving a collector vehicle to the meets.

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  • 1 month later...

Just saw this post and just have to jump in. Im a driver.......its what I love about the old car hobby. I love caravaning , I have many friends with a large variety of cars and seeing them all driving down the road is a great sight. But to a certain degree I get the trailering thing. Some of my friends cars are heavily built and driving them great distances is neither healthy for the car or economical......so they trailer.Several years ago I trailered a 72 Dart that I owned to Carlisle for the Mopar show.....and I have to admit I had fun.I pulled into the Mopar show driving a Dodge Ram dually....with a trailered Dart on the back and a 340-4 speed combo lashed down in the bed and I felt like I was home ....there was no way I wasnt a serious Mopar guy . So I get that aspect too,however when I go this year in one of the Buicks (hopefully the LeSabre) I will be driving

Dan

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Driving my '15 Truck about 30-35 mph which is maximum speed with rear brakes only over a long distance for a show with all of the oblivious drivers on the road will not happen out of common sense and safety. I am comfortable driving around town, but there are limits to what is practable with the brass & nickel era cars in my humble opinion. That is why I have a trailer.

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Bhigdog said it very well in Post #16, and I completely agree.

Our 11,000 mile all-original HPOF 1937 Buick Roadmaster Phaeton (80C) was awarded her HPOF ORIGINAL two months ago at Canyon, Texas. We chose to trailer to-and-from Canyon which was an 1,800 mile round-trip from New Orleans. The following month we DROVE that car approximately 600 miles on Texas backroads on the 2012 Glidden Tour, but chose to trailer to-and-from the tour.

Next June we will drive the 1914 Buick B-37 Touring on the VMCCA Nickel Tour at Alexandria Bay, NY for a tour of the Thoousand Islands area, and into Ontario, Canada. Would any reasonable person expect me to drive the 99 year-old Buick nearly 3,000 miles round-trip,........

and still make it back to work the following Monday?

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We love driving our old cars of every vintage, but we must be concerned with the potential for theft and vandalism. I thoroughly respect those who choose to drive cross-country, and have done it many, many times, but these days have become more aware of the need to protect what we have worked long and hard to enjoy. Regrettably, there are those who, perhaps out of envy, will intentionally damage your lovingly maintained car just out of spite. Thankfully this is not very common, but has been known to happen.

Out of sight - out of mind.

We drive, display, and tour, giving the public the enjoyment of observing our cars and enjoying their memories of times past.

We may choose not to have to leave them overnight in the narrow lines of the parking lot of the Holiday Inn Express where the potentially inebrieated driver of a rented Crossover, busy texting while parking next to us, can inflict damage.

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Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
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