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TG57Roadmaster

EZ Trailer Tire Change

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The rig we use is this 2005 Chevy Silverado 3500 Dually (loaded!) and a 24' V-nose trailer.

roig_1x.jpg

In three years of service, the only trouble we've had with tires is that one picked up a nail

and needed to be replaced. I'm of slight build, wasn't looking forward to jacking the trailer

up with a floor jack, and knew there had to be a better way, especially when travelling.

The images below are my solution...

spare_ramp_1.jpg

This ramp made it very easy, is lightweight and can be carried inside the trailer for road trips.

spare_ramp_2.jpg

Rated at 2,000lbs., I wouldn't use it for a loaded trailer, but unloading isn't a problem if it's

needed for an on-the-road fix.

spare_ramp_3.jpg

I don't know what others are carrying to address trailer flats, but this gives me great peace of mind.

(Sorry for the last three crappy IPhone pics).

TG

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I find a floor jack fairly easy to use and handy. I always take my NAPA 3.5 ton shop floor jack (and jack stands) along in the trailer and it will lift the 4,800 pound 24’ trailer with a 4,000 pound car inside with no issues. I have also used a floor jack to get a car onto the trailer that had a broken suspension and the wheel had to be removed.

post-30758-143139176296_thumb.jpg

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The ramp is a great idea;

We've used one for years, BUT it is one sold through Trailer, Boat, and RV Dealers -

It is designed and built to support the weight of your trailer and its contents safely, and makes tire-changing SAFE & QUICK

I paid around $50 for mine which has a dip made to "center" the good tire you pull up onto the ramp in order to raise the "flat", on which you have already loosened the LUGS. Mine has an extra thick rubber pad which raises the flat an extra inch, too!

Cheap insurance for old guys like me!,

and it also makes it easy to adjust brakes!!

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I've use mine more than I care to. Mine's a 'Trailer Aid". After a number of uses it showed some cracks. I called the maker and they sent me a new one at no cost, no questions asked...........Bob

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Marty told me about this device a few years ago, I went to a local Camper World type store, as he states about fifty bucks. I've used it a couple of times and it makes changing a tire so easy......great to have in the trailer....

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My wife bought me one years ago for my birthday. It came with a hanging rack to mount inside the trailer. Very handy. I have used it 3 times with a loaded trailer and it worked great each time.

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Hi Guys,

Mine is also the TRAILER AID PLUS

when you have to change a trailer tire, or adjust brakes - you will really appreciate this item, and for the $50 or so, it is a real Time-Saver, life-saver, and back-saver.

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My brother has a home made 'Trailer Aid".

It's an old railroad tie 30 inches long cut at a 30 degree angle.

It will take the weight of any loaded car trailer.

He uses a tilt ramp 22 ft trailer and keeps the block in the back of his open pickup.

It is not terribly heavy but no one wants to carry it off.

He set it up 6 or 8 years ago.

In 2008, we were towing a car to Hearsay and had a flat on the PA Turn Pike 20 miles east of the I-70 interchange.

The berm was very narrow, about 8 foot wide, and the flat was on the driver's side.

We were near the top of a hill with the road bending to the left.

He sent me about 150 feet down the hill to stand on the edge of the road.

I was to yell if a vehicle was hugging the edge.

He said it was so he could turn to kiss the vehicle as he was hit.

I am still surprised how fast he cracked the nuts, backed the trailer on the block of wood, pulled & replaced the tires and nuts.

Dropped the trailer & tightened the wheel nuts in just 5 minutes. He was back in the truck by the time by the time I got back.

With the exception of one very large motor home, every vehicle moved over at least 1/2 to a full lane on on the 2 lane east bound road.

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I agree that you COULD make one on the cheap, and have no argument with that, but lugging a section of railroad tie, and maybe dropping it on my toe (like I once did with a 7ft steel trailer ramp) doesn't give me thew warm-fuzzies.

The TRAILER-AID is plastic, very light weight, and holds 15,000 pounds --- got my vote, big time. I've convinced several friends to take better care of themselves, as do I, and my pacemaker agrees.

By the way, an electric tongue jack is a big plus too!

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I agree, the TRAILER-AID is the best option for most people.

Until this thread, I didn't now you could purchase one.

Thank You.

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I don't mean to be the odd ball here, but i've been using a 2x4 a long time for this. It only takes about a 1FT. long piece.

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Not much help when this happens.

DSCN2103.jpg

Bring two spares, you never know when the front will take the rear with it.

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Actually I now carry three (3) spares, a new Michelin, plus the last two remains of the original Chinese Junk Ironman (Carlisle) which came new on my trailer. They are 235/85-R16-LRE, and 3 of the original five tore up by splitting on the interior sidewall within the first 5,000 miles - and yes, I check tire pressure every morning when I trailer, and keep them at 80 PSI.

Rich, nobody ever suggested that you not carry a jack along with the ramp.

Sorry you had such a mess to deal with - you are lucky it didn't damage the side of the trailer, or even the fender flares, as once happened to mine.

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I carry 2 spares and a 3 ton floor jack in addition to my "timber". Marty: don't get too close to those Carlisles in the trailer. They may explode on their own!

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Actually I now carry three (3) spares, a new Michelin, plus the last two remains of the original Chinese Junk Ironman (Carlisle) which came new on my trailer. They are 235/85-R16-LRE, and 3 of the original five tore up by splitting on the interior sidewall within the first 5,000 miles - and yes, I check tire pressure every morning when I trailer, and keep them at 80 PSI.

Rich, nobody ever suggested that you not carry a jack along with the ramp.

Sorry you had such a mess to deal with - you are lucky it didn't damage the side of the trailer, or even the fender flares, as once happened to mine.

It was quite an ordeal as the rear one took some persuasion to get the bent up rim off and the steel belt got caught up i the drum so I got to do a bearing check to get it all unwound. I got her to the shoulder as soon as felt the tire let go. Surprising how fast one can ruin a rim.

In addition to checking pressure I urge you to carry a four way and hit the lug nuts on all wheels before you begin each morning(Ask me how I came up with that ) and do a visual inspection of each tire at every stop.

PICT0001j2post.jpg

As you can see we caught this one and I got to change it on a nice level parking lot instead of on the side of the road, AND got to enjoy an ice cream as it was at a dairy queen we stopped at for a treat.

Also make sure what ever jack you carry can actually pick up your loaded unit and you know where to place the cradle to jack. No sense in bending up your trailer.

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The 2 "second-spare" Carlisles are strictly a backup incase I have a 2nd one go bad before I can get to where I can buy new Michelin Load range "E" LTs.

I don't expect to ever ride on them, although one has 20 miles. and the other is less than 500. I still don't trust them based on what the other three did when new.

A lug-wrench is good,

but

a Torque Wrench each morning is even better - just takes a couple of minutes, and might even be considered "Iso-Metric" in lieu of excercise!

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)

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I find a floor jack fairly easy to use and handy. I always take my NAPA 3.5 ton shop floor jack (and jack stands) along in the trailer and it will lift the 4,800 pound 24’ trailer with a 4,000 pound car inside with no issues. I have also used a floor jack to get a car onto the trailer that had a broken suspension and the wheel had to be removed.

I have a trailer aid too and also AAA. Last flat tire, the angle of my trailer on side of road and way the trailer was tilted made it tough though with the trailer aid last trip to Hershey, so called AAA. Have Platinum AAA, but would have been faster to change myself. The Trailer aid worked great on my driveway when trailer was flat, so planning on taking my large jack next trip. How do you rig down inside the trailer? Tips?

Edited by ChazA (see edit history)

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Made a wood frame on the trailer floor next to the side door so the jack wheels fit inside plus chained the handle to the side of the trailer so it doesn't move and it also keeps the jack wheels from moving around. Many miles and zero isses.

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