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Kvinokor

Young and Eager to Learn

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Koby , I would suggest you check out Hudson and Terraplanes. They were "performance" cars of a sort,the histiory of racing usually appeals to young people.I started into Hudsond 40 years ago,still find them appealling.There is a very active discussion group at ClassicCars.com.

Roy

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Koby,

I hope you are having the "time of your life" right now. I've been here since Wednesday afternoon and am having a ball myself. Please fill us in on your experience when you get back home. Matt

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Koby, I had to replace my camera over a year ago and I wanted interchangeable lens so I bought a Nikon 3000. It's a nice camera but I have to use the viewfinder to compose photos instead of the display on the back of the camera. With the previous camera I would hold it above my head and aim down at cars and it let me get a bit of the top and hood of the cars which made more interesting photos than those shot from lower down that just showed the side views. I've contemplating getting another small camera just for car shows where I can hold the camera high and compose with the LCD display. I'll send you my email address and you can send me some of your photos but they'll have to be at a low resolution because I have dialup internet and high resolution photos take too long to load.

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Koby while you are at Hershee look for the reps from the car club there. I know the Cadlllac and Buick will be there. Be smart look for a car the does not cost a fortune to buy or to keep. When I was your age I had a 1950 Buick, great car and I learned a lot. I drove it for a while them I got hooked on a Austin Healy and then a Jaguar. Once I jumped to the Jag I got stupid. Here I was at 17 years old with a great looking car and something the girls liked but I couldnt afford to keep running. A lot of the guys here would always suggest a muscle car from the 70s but the cost could make you a wishing you had done something that you afford. One of the biggest cost is gas, you could burn l lot of money just goofing off. What I would suggest to you would be to find a really neat Pontiac Fiero, or Buick Reatta The Reatta will be old enough to be part of the AACA and they are great starter cars. The 80s wheels are just now comming in to vogue. Bottom line, get the car you can afford and you will love the car that much better.

the car hobby is something you can enjoy for a life time

Good luck and keep everybody posted, and remember get a car with 2 doors and no back seat. Youl thank us later

Chuck Kerls

booreatta@cox.net

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Koby- Great having you on the forum! I am probably one of the youngest here (24) I joined the forum when I was 19. I have been working on cars since I was 3 with my grandpa on the 1921 Chevrolet I own. It is great to see young people in the club like myself. I became so involved that I have become the President of LZOC-W and crazy enough that I found my grandfather's old '48 Lincoln and bought it back after 16 years! Anyway, PM me as I have much advice to give about entering the hobby on zero income and cars to look at and ones to avoid!

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You sound a lot like me. I'm 17, a junior in high school, and am really into classic cars, namely Buicks & Oldsmobiles. I'm trying to get a hold of a '50-'52 straight-8 Buick. I'm also trying to convince my friends that American steel is the way to go. So far this has been unsuccessful. It's nice to see there are other younger people that are into this kind of stuff. Ever been to they Syracuse Nationals? That was awesome this year.

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I'm also trying to convince my friends that American steel is the way to go. So far this has been unsuccessful.

Just show up to your highschool with some classic american iron. Make sure all of your friends are around to watch the girls come check out your " cool old car". Bet that will change their view on things.

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Koby, welcome to the AACA Forums. :)

I would encourage you in 2013 to attend a judging school and a CJE (Continuing Judges Education) course. You can then sign up for the Apprentice Judging Team at that meet, or the next one if you can't stay for the show. After you have served as an apprentice judge you can then sign up to judge on a Field Judging Team at the next show you attend. CJE's are specialized courses on things like tires, engines, interiors, exteriors, chassis, Mustangs, etc. The school is usually held the day before the Meet. the CJE's are usually held right after the Judges Breakfast the day of the Meet. Since you are an AACA member already you will receive the information about where those will be held when you get the magazine. You do not have to have a car to judge. But it sure will educate you on how as judges we do what we do and why with regard to the judging process.

Judging is a different side of the hobby and a good one to get into when you aren't sure what type of vehicle you want. You get to look at them in detail and see how simple or complex a certain year/make/model is.

The rule that is NEVER broken in judging is ever revealing a score on a vehicle outside of the judging team you are on. In AACA judging the scores are not supplied to anyone other than AACA personnel that require that information.

Also, if you have not read the Judging Guidelines you can find them here on line. http://www.aaca.org/images/2012_Judges_Guidelines.pdf

Read through that and then go to the Judging Discussion Forum with any questions that you have. We will do our best to answer them and guide you in your efforts.

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@Roysboystoys- Sounds very interesting, I’ll be sure to check out both the Hudsons and Terraplanes. I actually picked up an old Hudson hubcap at Hershey for my collection simply because I liked the look!

@Jackofalltrades70- Thanks for the well wishes! I hope you had as wonderful a time as I did! Quite frankly, I can’t wait for next year already! :D

@John2dameron- I’m not such an expert when it comes to cameras. My camera died at Hershey which was extremely unfortunate. I’ll have to read threw the instruction manual before the next car show I attend. I’ll get my photos posted as soon as I finish labeling them all

@Booreatta- Thanks for the feedback! I’m thinking I’ll just keep my eye out for some with the classic feel that is still affordable. I figure after college when I’m settling down is when I can really start seriously considered a challenging restoration project.

@1948Lincoln- I’ll definitely take you up on your offer for advice when dealing with classic cars and limited funds. It’s nice to know that there are other young enthusiasts out there! Sadly I’m the first person in my family tree to have any interest when it comes to cars of any era, so all of the knowledge I attain will have to come from books, and people I meet along my journey!

@Jack Stacey- It’s amazing to see that there are other young people out there that share the same interests as I do. I have never been to the Syracuse Nationals, nor do I really know what that is. I have a pretty hard time trying to convince people our age that classic cars are the way to go; plus I don’t get my license until January so I can’t even think about showing them yet! Have you had any luck trying to start a club at your school? My school won’t allow it sadly. Hope to hear from you soon, send me a message if you have anything you’d like to discuss. I’d love to hear someone around my age’s opinions on classics some time.

@Shop Rat- Taking a course in judging sounds like a great idea! Thank you for bringing that to my attention! I’ll absolutely look into it, hope there are some classes given close to me! :)

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I Figured I'd post my Hershey feedback and opinions here since many of you asked for me to share about my experience.

Basically, Hershey was amazing. I can't find words to describe the time I had. Everyone that I spoke to about the show prior to going made the Eastern Fall Meet out to be something out of a classic car guy fairy tale. And quite honestly, it was even more than that!

Everyone was extremely friendly, and offered opinions, and words of advice even when asked the simplest of questions. My mother (who was a trooper following me around for two days straight, without hesitation) and I left directly after I came home from school on Thursday at 3:10 PM and did not arrive in Hershey until 8:30, which was a long drive that I did not mind all too much. It really just increased the suspense. I spent Thursday Night when I arrived gazing in awe for a good 30 minutes at a beautiful 1929 Duisenberg that was going to be up for auction held by RM. Sadly it had a price estimate of over 1 million dollars because I would love to own one but that seems waaay too out of my league! :P

I set the alarm for 6AM Friday morning in order to make the most out of the one day I had to browse and shop the flea market. I would have loved to been able to come the whole week but sadly Junior year is pretty tough, and I couldn't afford to miss that many days of school.

I spent Friday in the flea market chatting away with some of the "old timers", trying to absorb some of their knowledge in such a short period of time. I really was amazed at all of the car parts, signs, and other interesting items that were available. The car corall was amazing and I saw many 'dream cars' of mine. I loved that people were so happy to answer questions. I was almost hesitant to ask some things in the beginning of the daybut after realizing that everyone was eager to be of any assistance I felt at ease asking any vendor a question.

I made a few purchases for my newly started and slowly growing collection. They consisted of a few license plates and some old hubcaps. My favorite of which was a porcelain 1915 set of Pennsylvania plates and an early Buick hubcap. I took lots of pictures which I will post ASAP and enjoyed meeting so many interesting people from all over!

Saturday was another 6 AM wake up day and was well worth it. My mother and I arrived at the show just in time to see many of the show cars driving onto the show field. All I can say is what a spectacular sight!Every car that pulled up seemed to make my jaw drop. I love and respect how proud people were of their cars, and I can only hope that one day I will have a vehicle that meets the qualifications of being in that field. I purchased an AACA jacket that I wore with pride to school today. All in all it was a great two days. I learned a lot, made some awesome purchases, and am even more passionate about classic car preservation than I was before. I can't wait until next Hershey!

:)

Edited by Kvinokor (see edit history)

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Sounds as though you had more than a good time at Hershey. Makes me want to go. Kudos to mom are in order, too!

I ran across an interesting web site, and thought of you when I did. It appears to have a lot of interesting info on the very subject(s) in which you are interested. Check it out - Table Of Contents For Autorevival.com

All may be interested in knowing the site has both a Casting Nr. and RPO decoder.

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A Few Questions I have:

1. Would a Model A be a good choice for a first restoration?

2. What equiptment is a must to have before even thinking about working on cars?

3. What do you do if a car you see is being sold without a title? Why does it matter?

4. What happens if a car doesn't have a key anymore? Do you get one made?

5. I've started to obtain some unique hubcaps for my collection and am curious about what cars they were used on and when. Is there a such thing as a hubcap encyclopedia? Or something to that effect?

Thanks in advance :)

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Hi Koby,

Why not try an English car. Light, simple to work on, great to arrive in and defo a chick magnet. Do it before you need room for a baby seat and whilst you still have hair to get the wind in.

post-86293-143139222259_thumb.jpg

Good luck with it all mate. John.

post-86293-143139222242_thumb.jpg

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1) A Model A is an excellent choice. They're affordable, reasonably plentiful, have amazing club and parts support, and are simple to work on. Drawbacks are: mechanical brakes and best kept under 50 mph- no L.I.E. runs, in other words. A Model A pickup would be an infinitely cool first old car for a young buck.

2) You need a set of hand tools. Sockets, combo wrenches, screwdrivers and pliers to begin with. Sears often puts comprehensive sets on sale. Drop hints to parents, grandparents, girlfriend etc for Christmas, birthdays and graduation.

3) I would personally never consider a car without a clean title. Sometimes it's no big deal, but you want to be sure whoever's selling it is the actual owner or has agency or power of attorney to sell it. You don't want to invest a lot of time and money in it only to have the legit owner show up with a warrant. You're out of luck if that person can prove legal title to it. Keep in mind that some states never issued titles, and some do not issue them on cars over 25 years old (GA comes to mind).

4) Any competent locksmith can make a key. Some older cars might be a challenge, but key blanks are available for most popular old cars.

5) You can post pics of the hubcaps here and odds are someone will know what it's for. A Hollander interchange manual shows and identifies wheelcovers as do sites like hubcapmike and Blackburn's.

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I was about to suggest a British sportscar too, for the same reasons as the Model A, and in the NYC metro area there are bound to be people who understand and can service them. I mean, if this podunk town in southern Virginia has two Brit car service garages... and one of them is run by a thoroughly noddy Englishman.

I myself am keeping an eye out for an MGB. The difference is the baby seat is now out of the picture and me buzz cut would have to be covered with a driving cap.;)

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Hi Glenn,

The MGA in the picture is mine and it has original factory hydraulic brakes with drum rear and disc on the front. I have fitted a power assist to the brakes because my sons drive it from time to time and forget about the extra pressure required until the first application. The brakes are excellent considering the age (1960). This car is rarely under 50mph because it is not happy at low revs. I agree that the support in terms of knowledge and parts is as good as it gets. Simplicity is the key. For example no door handles, with just a bit of cord in the door to open it, (often unnecessary) and plywood floor.

The MGB is a lot less 'agricultural' and was I believe designed largely with the American market in mind and may suit a young man more than an A.

John.

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Howdy John- didn't mean to imply that an MG could not stop and keep up with modern traffic as I know they can- one reason I'm interested in having one. Comment was about a Ford A which is not suited to modern high-speed traffic at all, but is still a fun vehicle and would be a very good car for Koby to learn on before he tackles a late-60s luxury car.

I like the idea of an MG or Triumph because they're simple and have good support, plus with the two Brit service shops here there's no question of having someone who can repair them. Tivvy (the noddy Englishter) was a Jaguar factory engine builder before he came to the States, and the guys at Southside British (the other shop) are just great to work with. Their specialty is MG but they've even had a TVR in there.

I would prefer a chrome bumper car, but the rubber bumper cars are more common here. Even though I think the late 70s federal bumper and headlamp height regs ruined the styling, the classic Brit roadster look is still there.

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@D Yaros- I'll check out that site right now! Thanks for the link :)

I spent HOURS on the site today. There is a whole lot of interesting info, and links. Unfortunately, it does take a whole lot of time and patience to dig it all out. Still, a very good site for one just getting into the old car hobby.

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Hi Glenn,

No offence taken mate. I agree with your comments about the the Ford which enjoy the same support in terms of parts and knowledge. I also have an 8 cylinder Studebaker that I have had since Koby's age and learnt so much from it.

post-86293-143139223107_thumb.jpg

And to you Koby: Sorry don't mean to hi-jack your thread with our conversation but you have the idea to ask for advice because some cars can be a bottomless pit and even when finished you don't have anything special. When I was your age I sought advice from older blokes and it was not only advice I got but help and often they would not take anything for parts or even labour if in the trade. Many were just happy to see a young'en taking an interest as it seems you have found out at Hershey. One of my young mates from those days was given a fully restored 1923 Willys Knight (that he had admired for 20 years) by a fellow member who had grown too old to drive and couldn't bear the thought of selling it to a stranger. I have seen a spirit of generosity here and am especially jealous of your offer to drive the Pierce Arrows. :)

Regards, John.

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@John.McMaster- At least for now, I'm going to stick with looking for some American steel for my first car. Thank you for the suggestion though. I'm jealous of your friends Willy present! I dream of something like that falling into my lap one day, but for now I'm going to keep saving my pennies! :P

@Rocketraider- Thanks for all of the answers to my questions. I figure if I do get a Model A (which I hope I do) It'll be for local roads, and cruising... nothing fast pace. I'll deffinetley start hinting tools as gifts for when the holidays come around! I hope I can find a Long Island Model A that's affordable and what I'm looking for since I'm not sure about how to go about shipping an item that large and it would be difficult for me to convince someone to drive me far for an inspection.

@D Yaros- Once again, I'm loving that site! Thanks again for the link :]

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Hi Koby

I am so glad to hear that you are having fun in the old car hobby. I was introduced to it by my father, it must be so much more difficult without a family connection, but it sounds as though your mum was very supportive on the Hershey trip. Bring on the driving licence hey?

I think you have already received lots of good advice on choice of car. A model A is great fun, if not very fast, but easy to maintain. I used to have a 29 sport coupe. A british sports car would also be good. An MGA might be pricey, but a B or a midget should be affordable with easy spares availability. The big 70s luxobarge might be cheap to buy, but may be difficult to work on without a lot of equipment and knowledge.

My main advice to you is to find something that does not require too much restoration in the first place. In other words, get something you can DRIVE. It may need work and you will be anxious to tear it to pieces, but try not to bury yourself in a protracted restoration project at first. That can come later.

As a new driver you will want to get out and have some fun. A scruffy old car can give you exactly that.

Good luck with it all, and keep us posted with your progress.

Adam...

Lincolnshire, UK.

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