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1935 Dodge Sedan trim


Guest Grant Magrath

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Guest Grant Magrath

Hi guys.

Just popped over from the pre-war Buick forum to ask if anyone has a pair of stainless cowl trim pieces they have no need of? We've had our Dodge since 1978, and we've never had those pieces. I thought it was about time we did!

Cheers

Grant

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Guest Grant Magrath

I believe so Allan. We had a 1935 "Chrysler" that was a Plymouth Deluxe with Chrysler badging that you had to be careful getting the right parts for, and after the war, quite a few Dodges and Desotos were actually re-trimmed Plymouths.

Cheers

Grant

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35 and 36 trim are not the same. Several years ago, I needed the same parts but for a 36. I took an extra piece of door trim and just cut the two small parts for the cowl then I used a dremel cutter and slit the edges right at the ends so I could roll the end over to close it. It worked great and nobody ever noticed they were not the original's. Something to think about if you can't find the right ones and have an extra piece for another area. It is an easy piece to make from a longer piece.

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Guest Grant Magrath

We have the same issue with few Buick parts people on eBay. Look up nuttybuick! Insanity!

It's not beyond us to fab something up from another 35 piece. Weird how they disappear! I'll see if I can find a picture or two to put up.

We've had the car since 78, and I used to drive it to school. Put it around a tree when I was 16. Didn't exactly endear myself to my father! Whilst technically it's not original, as the interior was restored in 1980, along with the damage and other bodywork from the above crash, the running gear is pretty much untouched apart from maintenance on usual wear and tear parts. We'll NEVER sell it. It's a part of the family. We've slowly been tracking down correct parts over the past 10 years to get it right. For the record, it's a 4 door flatback sedan with a rear mounted spare.

Cheers

Grant

PS Found a shot, behind my old 39 Chevy, and the 38 Buick we've just sold......

post-58284-143139178682_thumb.jpg

And this one just after a major earthquake. That silt comes up from the ground with water after a good shake. It's a process called liquifaction, if you're interested.

post-58284-143139178691_thumb.jpg

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Excellent car and story! Sad about all the damage from the earthquake. We saw a lot of coverage on it here.

Can't wait to see more closeups of the Dodge. It is a bit more rare model with the slant back.

Some shots of the spare on the back and how the top material is finished in the rim around it would be neat also!

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Guest Grant Magrath

Thanks guys.

It's the car that got me into to old car hobby. If only we had the internet back then! I'll track down, or take some more pictures for you. One of the things we left untouched was the roof. Someone had obviously got sick of the roof leaking and riveted a piece of steel over the fabric insert. It's still under there somewhere. We just painted the steel black.

The car was missing it's spare wheel cover when we bought it, but we found a good one when we started working on it back in 1980. I remember working with the body guy in his garage in the school holidays and hearing John Lennon had been shot. I was scraping the paint off the back, and uncovered a stamping that said "US Steel"

It was missing a hubcap as well, but the guy that sold the car to us back in 78 was a player in my father's rugby team and owned an enginnering business, so we smoothed out the best hubcap, using bondo where necessary, and tried casting some new ones. Brass was way too heavy, so we used zinc! The hubcaps were polished, chromed, and the original brackets were used to hold them on the wheels. Lost one in 1983, but I put an ad in the paper, and the guy who found it gave it back!

It had a terrible Carter carb from a 39 Chevy when we got it, and we put up with that Godawful thing for years before putting a Stromberg on her.

We've put a restored factory radio in her, and she goes like a champion! Only thing is, the head unit is a 35 Plymouth one.

The brakes are the best brakes on an old car I've ever driven. Talk about stop on a dime!

Best memories are taking my schoolmates for drives at lunchtime, and them going from the front to the back seat via the outside, and telling them the car was turbocharged by opening up the cowl vent and blipping the accelerator at the same time. Had them fooled. Not so good, were the painted whitewall tires! The car was black back then, and everyone thought it was a gangster car.

Sorry for rambling! More memories kept coming back, the more I typed!

And yes, earthquakes are pretty disturbing! Been through a 7.1, and a few 6's, and heaps of 5's. More than 10,000 so far. Parents and sister lost their houses. Mines a rebuild as well. But the building codes are pretty good here. Even so, we still lost 185 people in the worst one. My advice to you? Fix your heavy wall units, book cases etc, to the walls, and keep at least 3 days food and water handy. Water is the big one!

Cheers

Grant

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