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JohnD1956

56 Super

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During the replacement of the steering wheel project I had trouble with the door hinge and posted a request for help in the post war technical section.  Here is a link to that thread: need help w 56 door hinge

 

Based on the helpful replies I sourced two spring washers from the local hardware store.  They call em "wavy" washers now if you're looking for any.  Anyhow, I tried to reinstall this part onto the new washers to see if that was all that I needed:

 

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The washers were held in place in a wheel bearing grease pack, and are still in place after several attempts to do this.  And while it went in easy enough,  the problem was the "catch assembly would not fold, as required, and I could not move the door from the wide open position. 

 

Inspection of the catch showed what looked to be a deformity.  In this picture you can see the top and bottom slots are off center.  However, from what little I could see, both slots aligned with the pins inside the hinge and engaged the pins while allowing the two fastener holes to align.  So it seems it was made this way.  It is pretty stout metal versus what the pins appear to be so I tend to doubt it was deformed in operation of the unit while installed.  But I do not know that for certain. 

 

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Here is the spring side of this unit.  I can see that there are three moving parts.  And while the unit freely moved on the pin joint, I do not have the strength to fold the joint where that spring is. 

 

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This spring is definitely pinned into position already, but I wonder if the spring assembly was also pined to the hinge with a bolt or something?  

 

And if you can believe this, my small parts manual pictured below does not have any reference to a door hinge, so I am hoping someone does have an interchange manual or something so I can try to source a new hinge?  

 

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I believe that 2CARB40 has an interchange manual, maybe you could reach out to him. 

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John, I can't really help you with your spring question, but my guess is that its a door override spring so when its fully open, its less likely to come crashing back closed without a helpful hand. It looks like the two ears of the spring are resting on each of the two pieces connected to the spring pivot pin.

 

On the subject of your steering wheel, it looks awesome! Is it cool to ask how much it cost you?

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Thanks Ben. Lets just say it is a few years worth of birthday and Christmas presents.  And I have no regrets. I just hope my wife doesn't miss them too much. 😏

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revisited the brake adjustment this week.  As I read the manual I was surprised to see the recommended brake bleeding procedure called for the opposite of what I had always done.  The recommendation is to start at the closest wheel to the MC, drivers side front, and end at the pass side rear.  I always did it the opposite  except this last time, when instead, I just left bleeders open for a gravity bleed as I replaced the wheel cylinders

Anyhow, I also followed the manual for the most part in the brake adjustment. Namely all four wheels off the ground, tighten each till wheel just barely turns by hand, then back off 15 notches. 

 

Since I prefer my brake pedal high, I tightened the wheels till they just hardly moved by hand but then individually I tightened each wheel till I could not move the wheel, and then backed off 7 notches at each wheel.  At this state, the wheels turned without any brake shoe contact.  After a test drive I backed off the pass side front another 2 notches, reducing the pull to the pass side front.  Later I went back and backed off another two notches and now I have the slightest pull to the drivers side front.  And I can get my entire foot under the brake pedal when it is depressed.  

 

Now I have to address that horn.  Wanted to use it yesterday when I was almost wedged between a tractor trailer ,who decided he needed my lane for a wide left turn, and a commercial van who was pacing me looking at the car.  Good thing the brakes work well! 

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3 minutes ago, JohnD1956 said:

As I read the manual I was surprised to see the recommended brake bleeding procedure called for the opposite of what I had always done.

I have bled brakes every way but by the book and am convinced it makes no difference.   "Maybe" if on a completely dry system you might pull air from a line while bleeding another line...just bleed again.

I too back off 6-7 clicks after tight and write down for each wheel; then when I adjust after 10,000 miles I know how much difference...usually 2-3 clicks.  New shoes are checked every 1000 miles until stable.

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13 minutes ago, old-tank said:

I have bled brakes every way but by the book and am convinced it makes no difference

 

I agree.  I have not had problems bleeding a brake system from the furthest to the closest. Maybe they just had to write something?

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The safest way to do it is front to back to minimize amount of bleeding.  Otherwise you increase chance of getting  a bubble trapped in the middle.

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Since my car still has an intermittent hesitation off the line, which is exaggerated whenever there seems to be a stressful situation, I tried something a bit different on Sunday.  As I reported in another thread, leaving the car show I encountered heavy traffic.  What I did not say was that there is a steep road from the show site to the Rt 9 highway, where cars are traveling 55 mph. At the intersection I had to turn left timing my move between southbound and northbound high speed traffic.  That intersection, along with creeping up the hill,  caused me to expect hesitation and a potential stall condition just when I would be entering the traffic.  

 

Instead, I used low gear for creeping up the hill and entering the highway.  In low, the '56  pulled the hill (easily) at just barely above idle, which is an engine speed below the hesitation point.  I just creeped up the hill without any problem, and when I made the left onto the highway it jumped out like a scalded cat!  Pushed it into drive and away I went,  with no hesitation or issue.  Shortly thereafter I had hit another traffic jam climbing the slight grade to a 4 way intersection in the heart of Rhinebeck.  Once again I dropped it in low and just putted along till I was clear of the intersection and tipped er into drive.  

 

You all probably already know this, but it was new to me and it made for a much nicer drive. 

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56 minutes ago, JohnD1956 said:

You all probably already know this

Yep.

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I would really like to figure that mystery out one day with the old Rochester carbs. Everyone on the internet seems to rebuild them "wrong". It was really night and day when I put the WCFB on. 55 carbs are more plentiful than the 56 carb, maybe keep an ear out for one? I guarantee it will make your driving experience more pleasurable without that bog.

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