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Motor been sitting 10 years.


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Yes to the first question. Also, if there is a way to turn the engine by hand, do that also. Just a little will let you know if it is locked up or not. When cranking the engine, do it for maybe 30 seconds with no plugs in. Then theres fresh gas,etc. but I'll let others chime in on the subject.

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I would warm it up to operating temp and then change the oil and filter if equiped.

Our '72 Vette sat for 12 years and we pulled the plugsand rolled it over with the starter.

Put the plugs back in and shot a little gas down the carb. Took right off and ran fine.

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I have started engines that have been sitting for 30 plus years. I always drop the oil pan, thoroughly clean out the oil pan, inspect and clean the oil pump and screen, removing all sludge and looking for any evidence of bearing damage (broken pieces of metal in the pan). If you do not know the history of the car, don’t take a chance by starting it with old oil, oil filter, and sludge in the oil pan. You could ruin the engine by causing oil passages to get clogged or burn a bearing.

Before starting the engine change fluids, and inspect everything. A little time doing maintenance can save you thousands of dollars doing an engine rebuild.

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While you are at it disconnect the fuel line at the fuel pump. If there is old gas in the tank it has probably turned to varnish which will gum up your motor. Use a motorboat gas tank if you have one.

Clean the points if there is no spark but don't monkey with anything you don't have to. I always start with the assumption it ran when put away, and go over the ignition and carburetor and valves but don't change any parts or settings without good reason. If an engine won't start, and somebody messes things up, then you don't know what is the matter. You have to go right back to basics and check EVERYTHING.

I like to oil the cylinders and get the motor turning over. Then check if I am getting spark from the coil, and from the coil to the spark plugs. Then put the plugs back in, put a little gas down the carb and let her rip.

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A Dodge of that era should have a plug in the fuel tank. Take it out and drain the tank. If not, I have used copper tubing to siphon the old fuel out of a tank. If it has old fuel in it, do not be supprised if the fuel pump valves are also gumed up. Keep comming back if you have problems. Someone will answer. Dandy Dave!

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Her's a true story: I got my dad's 1964 Buick Electra convertible. It was pretty rough but he started a restoration on it about 15 years ago. He rebuilt the engine, trans and diff but never got around to the body work (which got progressively rustier through the years). The engine (trans and diff) had less than 20 miles on them when last parked and all had new oil.

The engine was stuck when I got it so I pulled the heads and found a rusted valve in the guide. I sure am glad I didn't force the engine over, it would have caused a lot more damage. I went through the heads and put everything back together. It started up and had a tick for a few minutes but settled down and ran nice. I did change the oil and filter before I started it.

I decided to pull the pan a couple of days ago to repaint and put a new gasket in. I was completely shocked at what I found. Remember, the car was p[arked with new oil, less than 20 miles on the engine and I changed the oil again before I started it 6 months ago.

There was about 2" of goo in the bottom of the pan that resembled a cross between jello and yogurt!!

I can't help but think that I may have caused some damage or could have had a catastrophic failure if I kept running it.

My advice is to drop the pan on ANYTHING that has sat more than a couple of years!

It may save a lot of damage and problems.

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There was about 2" of goo in the bottom of the pan that resembled a cross between jello and yogurt!! I can't help but think that I may have caused some damage or could have had a catastrophic failure if I kept running it.

My advice is to drop the pan on ANYTHING that has sat more than a couple of years!

It may save a lot of damage and problems.

Add me to the list of folks that agree with dropping the oil pan and the gas tank. Mine sat for 40 years and had 4" of gritty, gooey, crap in it that looked like gray river clay. When I got the car I didn't know that I should do those things and I tried to drive it regularly. That resulted in a serious clog in my oiling system that stranded me 20 miles from home. I'll never drive an old car again without first cleaning out the oil pan, gas tank, and transmission pan. I learned my lesson! I forgot to take pictures of my cleaning process but check out these pictures from a fellow forum member.

post-75106-1431391429_thumb.jpg

post-75106-143139142911_thumb.jpg

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I just dropped my oil pan a couple of weeks ago. I was surprised at the amount of sludge in the bottom of the pan even though the Continental engine that my Durant had in it had what they called an oil filtrator that was an early type of oil filter. I guess it had to do with the dirt roads and poor air cleaners of the day.

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As you can see, opinions differ...but with a 49 Dodge you can afford to take chances if you wish.

All kinds of nasty things can've happened where you cant see'um until you pull the pan, as mentioned, and the head, BEFORE turning it over.

The internets full of checklists to consider; you might also search "stuck engine" on some of the Ag forums--farm eqpmt engines, often on a piece of eqpmt used only a small part of the year and sitting out in the weather, "stick" all the time, sometimes fatally for the engine if mishandled.

I'll confess to just firing up long defunct engines, without serious results, but it was more luck than brains, for sure.

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