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Rare marques that you have seen


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Fellow AACA members,<BR>What is the rarest marque that you have come across during your interest in restored cars?<P>My main area of interest is small US "independent" makes of the 20's, so I would be interested in any sightings of cars from some of the smaller manufacturers in the USA during this period. You may have come across the only survivor from the company's entire production run!<P>If you can post a picture, so much the better smile.gif" border="0

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Every year, the Antique Auto Restorers Club of Bellingham, Washington hosts a show that attracts many beautiful and unusual cars. When I last attended, I saw -- among other things -- a Locomobile, a Winton, a Franklin, a Huppmobile, a Roosevelt, a Crane-Simplex, a Doble, a Northern, a Pierce-Arrow. I'm sure that I've forgotten some of the lesser known makes that were on hand, but this show strikes me as highly unsual in that the preponderence of cars are antiques and special-interest models. Although all makes and models are welcome, this show attracts only a tiny number of hot rods. Virtually every other show I attend -- with the exception of the marque-specific shows -- seems dominated by the rods.

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Guest leadfoot

During last fall's AACA auction at the Convention Center, had the privilege of guiding the 1913 Jackson Olympic touring. Though appearing mostly original, it had nickle plating to die for. It didn't run because of a damaged Prest-O-Lite pump, but my guess is that it is very operable.

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Guest De Soto Frank

A lonnnnng time ago(1976?), at an antique car show (Possibly AACA) at the Maryland State Fair Grounds in Timonium, among lots of brass era cars (including several curved-dash Olds!), there was a rather neat looking German car: a Rohr(perhaps Rohrer?)mid-thirties, with a tear-drop shaped "aero-coupe" body; dark blue.<P>I also recall seeing in a museum or collection, an early 1920's sedan with a rear-mounted radial aircraft engine; can't remember more than that!

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Some interesting makes mentioned already!<BR>I would like to see the Doble, the "Rolls-Royce" of steam cars.<P>Here in Australia I have seen an Erskine, Durant, REO and Chandler on display, plus the Australian Six and the Australian built Lincoln (no connection with the US make).

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God, where do I begin?<BR>I have repaired and maintained some real oddballs and owned a few myself.<BR>Cleveland, Chandler, Mitchell, Baker, Aerocar, Cisitalia, Delaunay-Belleville, Arrol Johnston, Gray, Adler, Horch, Durkopp, Durant, Wikov, Grout and others which I'm probably forgetting for a good reason.<BR>My own orphans I won't mention.<P>My all time favorite that I did a valve job on was a '23 McFarlan, What a well engineered, precise, silent conveyance, steered like a truck but drove like a dream.

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DeSoto Frank ~ The car you saw was a 1933 Rohr owned by AACA Past President Edgar Rohr. I believe it was a 1933 Berlin Auto Show car, a one off. To the best of my knowledge the car was always tan. ~ hvs

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Guest EMF-Owner

Interesting topic. <P>I Had never heard of a Rickenbacker until a few years ago. Now a buddy of ine has two of them, a 1923 and 1925 I believe.<P>I Guy in one of my clubs use to own a yellow Ruxton Roadster. That was a neat car. Late 20's I believe.<P>Another gentalmen in the same club owned a 1910 Burg Touring. The only one left as far as he knew. It was built in Dallas City Illinois, the same town where this guy lived. I would love to get my hands on that car.<P>I have a 1912 E-M-F Demi Tonneau in my garage. So far, I only know of about 4 other 1912 E-M-F Demi Tonneaus in the world.<P>I also knwo where there is a 1916 Detroit Electric I would love to call mine. <P>Dream Dream Dream........

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Several years ago at a local car show (AACA?), I saw the most handsome little Brass era car ever, IMHO. It was called a "Paris-Breeze" (spelling may be off, but I don't think so), built about 1913. The owner said it was one of three built and the only to survive. It was a beautiful little aluminum bodied thing that I've actually seen twice. The first time was when it was on a trailer several years before I saw it at the show and I fell in love with the thing right there.<P>On a related question: Has anyone here heard of a Morse automobile? It was built in New England in the (very early) 20th century. The reason I ask is that I have a small packet of really beautiful big B&W photos (professionally done?) and a short hand-typed history of the car written in the early 70's (?) by the owner, Dr. Stan Moody. I bought the packet from a small used bookstore in Newport, RI a few years ago and have been looking for any mention of these cars anywhere withut success since. I would happily give copies of the photos and story to the present owner of the cars should they still exist. I expect that they do, as they appeared to be in fine shape when the photos were taken.

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I may be wrong, but I think it is a Breeze-Paris. It has been exhibited at a number of AACA National Meets over the past couple of years. ~ hvs

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Christopher, The Mors was built in France, The Stan Moody car was sold about ten years ago. I believe it may have an early race car at one time. Stan Moody Jr. should be listed in an AACA or VMCCA roster, and was in Rhode Island the last time I knew.

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Guest Albert

A number of years ago my dad and I made new coach work (all the wood from front to back) for a 1928 Auburn Boat Tail, while working on it we found it was #7 of the frist 25 cars built. The frist 25 wood was done by a cabinett maker and had 2 golf club doors instead of 1 and 2 spare tires amoung other things. When i finish my Packard I have a chance to pick up a 50's Allard with a ford flat head V8.

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To 1937hd45 re: the Morse, <P>The car depicted is definitely not a Mors though I've heard of them as well. I have a detail picture of the emblem on the car and it is spelled MORSE very clearly and is surrounded by lettering that says "Easton Machine Co, South Easton, Mass, USA" so I suspect that it wasn't built in France. It really is a pretty car, I think. This coming weekend, I can scan and post some of the photos on my website if you like. Thanks for the info on Dr. Moody, however! <BR> grin.gif" border="0

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Christopher, Thank you, I stand corrected on the Morse. Does your photo show a license plate MORSE on the front? I believe there is only one survivor of this make. The Moody car was on the front cover of the VMCCA magazine years ago, white body with red running gear.

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To 1937hd45,<P>That's it! I have a postcard in color of the white one as well as the B&W's. There is another photo of the car wearing dark paint, presumably black, with two older men in it. It appears to have been taken in the mid 60's and the caption on the back stated that Gov. Chaffee is the passenger - Kinda cool, no?

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Here is the Beaulieu Encyclopedia entry on the Morse:<P>MORSE (1910-16)<BR>Easton Machine Co, South Easton, MA<P>Alfred G Moore started experimenting with cars in 1904, but did not put one on the market till 1910. The 24hp 4 cylinder Model D was expensive at $3900 to $4000. 1911 models were larger at 34hp and even more expensive, from $4000 for a tourer or roadster to $5200 for a limousine. The Morse was practically out of production by the end of 1913, thougha few more cars were delivered up to 1916.

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Guest Hal Davis (MODEL A HAL)

One fellow in our club has a '31 Auburn Boat Tail. At the Concours de Elegance, there was a Cord and several Duesenburgs. Not as rare as some, but the only Duesenburgs I've ever seen. There was also a show here in Savannah that attracted nearly all of the remaining Mercer race cars. I don't recall how many. It was something like 7 of 9 or something like that.

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Late this afternoon, I was driving my '59 Buick through the tiny town of Granite Falls, Washington, and was amazed to see a beautifully-restored brass-era car parked on the street. By the time I parked and made my way for a closer inspection, the owner was sharing some information about the car with a group of enthusiastic passersby.<P>The car is a 1912 Abbott, which was built in Detroit and powered by a Continental engine. The cars were evidently built for a period of several years, and the owner reported that his car is one of only five Abbotts known to exist. Always fun to see something different.

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There is an Anderson in the SC State Museum in Columbia, SC. Also have seen one in local parades and shows. The Anderson Motor Company was located in Rock Hill, SC about 1,000 yards from where my office is. Incidently, I work for the founder's great grandson.

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I havent seen it in years, but there was an early 20's Moyer, (wood body, chain drive) running around near Cooperstown NY. It eventually ended up in a roadside museum, then the museum closed and all exhibits were sold. My Father worked in the Moyer plant, Wolf St. Syracuse, then at Franklin Motors. (bad choices for job security!) grin.gif" border="0

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Old Iron, another Anderson is in Paul Ianuario's (yes the same individual that is driving the 1939 BMW 328 in the Mille Miglia) collection. His runs great and is the convertible touring body that was designed by Anderson. By flipping the back seat he converts the car from a touring style to a roadster.

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A fellow I know of has a couple barns full of old, unrestored cars, mainly 30s &40s. I went through maybe ten years ago and should have had a camera. <BR>The one unusual car I remember was a Horch (say 'Hork'). They probably weren't an especially low-volume car, but they're rare on these shores.

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The Ameila Island Concours is a great affair. The Y2K show actually had 20 Mercers present, of the 142 documented Mercers still in existence. Anyone with a passion for cars would enjoy this event. Why there was even a 1939 Lagonda V-12 Rapide there too... really!

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In 1966, at Hershey, I saw a car that I have never forgotten. Unfortunately, I do not remember the name except that it was American and manufactured sometime during the 1920's. The memorable part is that EVERYTHING WAS SQUARE. It was the ugliest car I have ever seen. Even the WHEELS were square and had 1/4 moon inserts to make them round for tire mounting. I'm not sure, but I think the steering wheel was square too. I have been unable to find it the Standard Catalog of American Automobiles. It was definately a car that was manufactured in the 1920's and not something thrown together in somebody's back yard. Has anyone ever seen this car or one like it? Like I said, it was at the Hershey meet in October, 1966. shocked.gif" border="0confused.gif" border="0

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How about a 1913 WAHL made in Detroit Mich I have the remains of a touring car that has been in the Rochester NY area since new,the body was removed and the balance was made into a light truck.I have owned it for several years and someday hope to be able to restore it .MIKE

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Just some information on some of the marques mentioned in the thread.<P>Abbott cars were manufactured in Detroit and Cleveland between 1909 and 1918. Just over 12,000 cars were made in that time.<P>The Anderson was manufactured in Rock Hill, SC betwen 1916 and 1925. About 10,000 cars were made. The company used the slogan "A Little Bit Higher in Price but Made in Dixie"<P>The Moyer was made in Syracuse NY between 1911 and 1915. Only 400 odd were made, so finding a survivor is pretty good. Hopefully the car in question will be restored.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The rarest car I think i have seen was a very early Little Princess. The car was owned by the Pollard family and i understood at the time it was a car Barney Pollard bought for his young daughter. It was in a huge warehouse with about 100 other cars including many early Cadillacs,Loziers, American Underslung, and a Eagle which is also extremely rare. shocked.gif" border="0grin.gif" border="0

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this message to JAN ARNETT<P>do you know about the French " ETOILE DE FRANCE " <P>it was a three wheeler, manufactured in a suburb of Paris in the early thirties, very much like a British Morgan.<P>There still might be several in existence. I have an original bonnet name plate ; if you are interestec I could send you a picture when I find it. If you wish more information just send your Email address smile.gif" border="0

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A fellow in our region (now deceased) had a 1901 U.S. Long distance. If I recall correctly it was made in Jersey City N.J. A few years ago I ran a hill climb and a fellow showed up with an Abbot Detroit racer. I remember it having blue canvas fenders. Al

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Guest BruceW

1937HD45,<P>I don't think Straightaway is describing the Dagmar. The wheels on the Dagmar are not square. The Dagmar has wood spoke wheels with full metal disks covering the spokes. Also the steering wheel is not square but round as most other cars.<P>One interesting thing about the Dagmar is that the steering wheel can be slid out of the way, like the mid-60s Thunderbirds. Another unique feature is...where any other car would have chrome or nickel... the Dagmar is trimmed in brass... brass bumpers, brass hubcaps, brass fittings, brass steering wheel column. etc.<P>The Dagmar, made between 1922 and 1927 is definately a unique car. About the size of a Sherman tank and probably about the weight of one.<P>A few years ago Di and I planned our region's weekend Fall Run to the Hagerstown area. Members of the Mason Dixon Region heard we were coming to the area, and when we visited a small museum in Boonesboro, several of the members were waiting there with their cars to say hello. Parked out on the street in front of the museum was a Dagmar. It was the first and only time I have seen it in person.

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