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Need info on a 1930's Daimler Limo


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The story told to me is that this car was used at the coronation of King George VI. This collector bought the car from the family decades ago and eventually had it shipped to the USA.

The research opportunities for Daimlers here in the USA is hard to come by. I have ordered several books.

This car is a 4.6 liter straight eight. I believe it may be a 1936.

The data tag on the firewall says "Type V. 4 1/2 LITRE" "No 43512" "The Daimler Co Ltd" "Coventry, England".

The car is fitted with Daimler "FLUID FLYWHEEL" TRANSMISSION.

Any help on info is appreciated. Any sources such as owner's manuals or shop manuals would be fantastic.

Tom Wallace, Dayton, Ohio

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Tom, congrats on your find. Assume you are the OH Tom Wallace in the CCCA roster, so you already know the car is a Full Classic, and no technical advisor for the marque as there are only around 6 Daimlers in the whole club. Wish I could be more help, but just grabbed my handbook when I saw this to see if that would be the right direction but no luck...

The car looks complete though, hopefully you post an update on your progress from time to time.

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT
clarity (see edit history)
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  • 1 month later...

(Didn't realize there were 2 threads on the subject.)

Chassis 43512 was sanctioned and built in 1936, according to Brian Smith's Daimler Days. According to Glass's Car Check Book, however, chassis 43500 thru 48399 were issued from February 1937 until sometime in 1940 (tho' some may have been issued out of sequence, and earlier or later than expected). At any rate, this is a coach-built car, so it doesn't necessarily follow that the body was built the same year as the chassis; but usually chassis were bodied the same year or the following one. Does the car have a coach-builder's tag? Is the body-builder known?

I can look up the registration number tonight in a book I have at home to determine registration year, which is the official year of a British car of this period (and which will most likely be the same year the body was completed).

Edited by Bill K.
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Specs for the regular Straight 8 (not the Light Straight 8):

H.P. = 32

R.A.C. = 31.8

BORE/STROKE = 80 X 115

C.C. = 4624

WHEELBASE = 11' 10"

TYRE SIZE = 7.00 X 18

Source: Stone & Cox, Motor Specifications and Prices, 1948 edition

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  • 1 month later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I just started restoration last week.

My first goal was to remove the steel fenders. To my surprise the fenders are paper thin; only good for patterns in my opinion.

Does anyone know a shop that has reproduced these fenders in the past? Or perhaps have a lead on some decent fenders?

I have been told by my car buddies that it would be better to fabricate the fenders in aluminum. The rest of the body is made in aluminum.

I have been told the aluminum is lighter weight, an easier metal to fabricate and holds up better than steel.

Any leads appreciated.

Tom Wallace, Dayton, OH

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