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Clean and detail engine compartment 63 riv (what to use and tips)

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Eric,

This would be a great undertaking for someone/group of guys to come up with. There are no original cars in my area that I know of. My '64 has had an exterior repaint in a non factory color and the under carriage / engine compartment is really dirty right now. As I start getting to the point where I can get it all de-greased and cleaned, I'll have to see what I can find. One problem that I know that I'll face is knowing what was original where there may now be some surface discoloration on what may have been natural colored surfaces.

Thanks,

Ed

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Can anyone be specific on what does and what does not match up?

Just at a glance the fan shroud and ac/heater housing, wiper motor, etc...would hate to see someone rattle can a nice original fan shroud with gloss black. There are also different suppliers who provided different finishes on their respective components,ie, the power brake booster and master cylinder unit. Just at a glance...

Tom Mooney

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Thanks for the great info in this thread. After a 5 year hiatus, I am working on getting my '63 running and driving again. When I bought the car the PS pump was already toast so I started disassembling it to replace it, but that was almost exactly 5 years ago. Now I'm finally getting back to replacing the PS pump and am stuck on what color the brackets should be, and more trying to understand the sequence of assembly.

I've read the engines were first assembled and then painted silver. Everyone seems to say the front bracket should be silver but the attached pic of original literature shows what looks like a black bracket to me. Is the rear bracket also silver or black? I've seen several pics of restored cars where both brackets are painted silver. Not sure what is correct, but if both brackets were first assembled and torqued to the engine and painted silver, how was the PS pump later installed? Should the lower support brace that bolts from the PS pump bracket to the block be silver or black?

I have similar questions on the other side of the engine for the AC compressor brackets. I've seen where the rear bracket is painted silver on some restorations but that does not seem correct. The top brace is undoubtedly black (satin black I assume), and I suppose the front bracket is silver?

I am missing that top brace from the AC compressor to the head(?) so if anyone has an extra I can use it. Were they all the same for '63-'65?

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thanks for the help

-Scott

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Phew! I'm going to get that can of WD-40 out and spritz mine up a little. This is beginning to remind me of when I came home from a show in 1994 and decided to clean some wire ends with lacquer thinner. Look what I had by the end of the week.

Bernie

[ATTACH=CONFIG]148693[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]148694[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]148695[/ATTACH]

What brand of coffee do you drink?

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Hi Scott,

I can tell you that my very original '63's PS brackets are both painted silver, and there is no evidence that they were ever painted black. Having worked in the media relations/public relations department of an OEM for many years, I can also attest that almost all images in any original literature brochures, etc., are of pre-production vehicles, due to long lead times to lay out, print, and circulate those brochures. Hence the golden words in most of them that say "preliminary specifications, subject to change."

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Paul's tip re using tin foil is great/ I took his advice a while back and I got good results. Easy to use, easy to mold and form around tight places. Didn't have the heart to put it back in the kitchen.

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On 8/6/2012 at 10:09 AM, 60FlatTop said:

Phew! I'm going to get that can of WD-40 out and spritz mine up a little. This is beginning to remind me of when I came home from a show in 1994 and decided to clean some wire ends with lacquer thinner. Look what I had by the end of the week.

Bernie

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Bernie, your garage and my garage look a lot alike. My organization has improved. I can find things better. No one else could make any sense of it, But they do have to make any  sense.

Red Riviera Bob

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Steelco

enclosed are some before and after of my 67. Take Bernie's ( as well as other's) advice and unless you're a decent mechanic, which I am not, learn to work around stuff instead of removing. The relays, etc are easy of course, and it helped when the mechanic replaced the timing chain. While he did the rough stuff I poked around with the details. ALL of the guys on these pages are helpful and their knowledge is really valuable. Especially the tip about the tin foil as masking. (Don't forget to disconnect the battery.)

The list of correct paint that Ed posted is crucial/ print it out and don't lose it.A good example of working around something is the wiper motor/ I was warned by more than a few experts that it's a real bear to screw around with. But with your tiny artist brushes and even a Q-tip, and some cases a toothpick, you can get really good detail if you have the time and patience.

Good luck!!

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On 8/5/2012 at 2:20 PM, RivNut said:

I looked at the picture and from what I can see that would be easy to do that would make a real difference would be to:

 

  • Remove the battery.
  • I use Simple Green spray and low water pressure and try to remove as much dust and dirt as possible.
  • Blow other dust and dirt loose as you can using an air compressor and blow nozzle and use the air to dry any places that might still be wet from washing it down.
  • Unbolt all of the items from the inner fenders and mask and paint the inner fenders a satin black after going over the surface with a scotch-brite pad to give the surface some tooth. Just loosen them and move the accessories (horn relay, voltage regualtor, vacuum tank, etc.) out of the way, don't disconnect them from anything.
  • Take some lacquer thinner and remove the overspray from the wiring harness (from the looks of the inner fenders and the wiring harness, it looks as if the car was repainted and oversprays got into the engine compartment) and other items.
  • Use the same lacquer thinner to remove dirt and grime to restore the original color to exposed wire insulation.
  • Repaint the air cleaner and install one of CARS, Inc. silk screened air cleaner decals - I notice the 465 on the air cleaner; you have one of the low production 425's from '63.
  • Get a couple of pieces of cardboard and some masking tape and repaint as much Silver as you can on the engine. One nice thing about cast iron - you don't have to worry about a mirror like finish. Use a foam brush and tab paint where it's needed. You can mask some places to get a fine line where needed.
  • Use a brush applied exhaust manifold dressing on those.
  • Get some black heater hoses and reroute them to make them as inconspicuous as possible.
  • Use a small brush with Simple Green on it and get into all the corners.
  • As Bernie says, remove anything that's easy and repaint it after cleaning and some light sanding.
  • Becareful what you leave on the engine in the way of chemicals. They may look dry, but they'll gather dust.
  • Reinstall the battery. This time with the POS terminal next to the radiator. (If $$ permit get a black #0 gauge negative battery cable. Originally Buick used two black cables, but I like the looks of a red POS cable. There's a clip on the inner fender to hold the POS cable down and against the inner fender. You won't find #0 gauge wire at your corner jobber. I had some made at a local NAPA regional shop.
  • As you get started, things will become easier and you'll start getting more and more ideas as to what you can do to spiff things up. Having a nice large glossy picture of a restored engine compartment will help you see what else you can do.

 

Good luck and let us see some "after" pictures.

Ed

Ed, thanks again. All makes plenty of sense. The less I disconnect the better I feel. Simple green is a favorite of mine and I recently saw Simple Green has a degreaser product. ( it’s new to me)

Red Riviera Bob

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On 8/6/2012 at 9:51 AM, Paul from PA said:

Don't forget to use aluminum foil to wrap around things you don't want painted or overspray to cover. Oh and when your done the the foil, put in back in the cupboard were you found it...........

Paul, I appreciate the tip. 

Thank you

Ted Riviera Bob

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On 6/20/2014 at 4:13 PM, rocky5517 said:

Paul's tip re using tin foil is great/ I took his advice a while back and I got good results. Easy to use, easy to mold and form around tight places. Didn't have the heart to put it back in the kitchen.

The unused foil in the box, Rocky, not the stuff you used.  ? 

 

My wife wasn't too happy when she wanted to cover the top to the broiler pan and had to dig around in the garage to find her aluminum foil.  Now she has a roll in tne kitchen and i have my own in the garage.  Note: a piece of aluminum foil folded into a pad works great with water to remove surface rust.  Even better with Coca-Cola instead of water, just a hint of acidity.

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On ‎9‎/‎27‎/‎2017 at 1:17 PM, rocky5517 said:

But with your tiny artist brushes and even a Q-tip, and some cases a toothpick, you can get really good detail if you have the time and patience.

How did you paint your brake booster? I recently had my brake master cylinder replaced but not the booster and mine is very dingy looking like yours was. What did you do to clean it up and repaint it? Which brand of gold cadmium paint did you use?

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Boosters are usually zinc dichromate finished.  Eastwood sells a kit which "sort of" replicates it, but in order to do it correctly, it would need to be sent out.  I think that Booster Dewey does this as a service for $50 according to his website.

 

http://boosterdeweyexchange.com/

 

 

 

Ed

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:D                       I think we are being conned on this forum.......when I got to work today I checked the Riviera forum and Red Riviera

Bob had commented on 6 old blogs and according to my computer screen, they were posted in the middle of the night. Red Riviera

Bob.....are you really Donald Trump in disguise?

Edited by Seafoam65 (see edit history)

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23 hours ago, RivNut said:

Boosters are usually zinc dichromate finished.  Eastwood sells a kit which "sort of" replicates it, but in order to do it correctly, it would need to be sent out.  I think that Booster Dewey does this as a service for $50 according to his website.

 

http://boosterdeweyexchange.com/

 

 

 

Ed

Here is the finish from Booster Dewey on the piece from my Oldsmobile

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On the pix of my 67, posted a while back but they're in this thread, Dewey did indeed re=coat ) if that's the proper term) my vac booster. He sends them out, and he asked me if I had anything else that I wanted re-done to match. I sent him the cap from the resevoir, and then he reminded me that the hood latch should be done too. Don't remember how much but I know it was really reasonable. Like, really reasonable.

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On 1/10/2018 at 11:00 AM, NC68Riviera said:

How did you paint your brake booster? I recently had my brake master cylinder replaced but not the booster and mine is very dingy looking like yours was. What did you do to clean it up and repaint it? Which brand of gold cadmium paint did you use?

I just took a look at some pictures of the engine compartments of 1969 Rivieras on Google Images. From what I see, it's hard to tell if the booster is zinc plated or cad plated.  If it's cad plated, the pictures I saw show the cad plating as very light in color.  

 

The zinc plating can be reproduced with a product from Eastwood.  Go to the Eastwood website and search for part #13242Z.

It's called: Eastwood Zinc Rich Galvanize and comes in an aerosol 13 oz can.

 

The cad plating can be reproduced with a system from Eastwood.  Here's a video that shows "how to" along with a link to purchase it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Rather than aluminum foil I use Saran Wrap. Clings awesome, Removes easily, plus other positives.

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I think the motors should be pulled, placed in the kitchen and then detailed. Close to everything we need and the Mrs. can still find the foil and Saran Wrap.  A win -win situation........

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This is a bit of a digression, but my uncle learned how to rebuild engines in my grandparent's living room.  As the story goes, he had an engine from an old Buick that he put away under the grand piano when he wasn't working on it.

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I also use large quantities of aluminum foil for detail work. One warning, disconnect your battery and cover the positive terminal, foil is a great conductor. And whatever you do don't get gasoline on the foil before you learn about its conductivity, you can imagine how I know this...

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Good day...

 

Man, it's amazing how much information is in this forum's archives... finding and searching isn't always quick and easy, but lots to find nonetheless... While searching I often get way sidetracked on other topics of interest but not necessarily the topic at hand...

 

Anyway, not sure if this is the right thread, but onward... I too am in the process of redoing the engine bay on my '64 and for all intent and purpose, it's near a point I'm very happy with but the colour reference (right, wrong or indifferent) posted in this thread is pretty handy, thanks. A lot of my bay was done as my engine was just rebuilt, and now I am just trying to clean and touch-up the underside of the hood. Although I vacuumed the existing insulation, it was looking a tad shabby so I picked up a set of the new under hood insulation from oldbuickparts.... 


On my original insulation, there is a cutout in one corner of the passenger's side, (as well as a circle right above the air cleaner.... (image attached)  Although a little tough to see, it appears that this cut-out is shown in the '63 noted above in post #18.  I recently noticed this in Post #763 of the below noted thread, but didn't really look too close at the time, but it looks like that '65 doesn't have any insulation, but a tell tale mark ion sorts n the same location... http://forums.aaca.org/topic/283876-rivieras-for-sale-on-local-craigslist-ebay-etc/?page=31

 

My Riv' does not have a/c, so I'm not sure why the cutout as it appears there shouldn't be any interference below. I'll figure out if the new insulation touches the air cleaner, likely put a dab of something (vaseline?)  on the top of the air cleaner and see if it touches the insulation when I close the hood. But, were these cutouts part of the original? Also do these panels need any adhesive? I was thinking of a couple small strips of two-faced tape just in case... And maybe final (stupid) question, if anyone has used these new panels, one side has a 'smooth' black side, the other is a bit 'rougher' with a grey swirl type pattern/colour. I'm assuming black side out, but I have seen at least one picture where they installed the greyish side showing.

 

Hope this make sense... any comments would be appreciated....

 

Thanks.

 

Later,

 

Mike Swick

Edmonton, AB

----=

 

UnderHoodRiv - 1.jpg

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Without knowing the gospel truth, I would say that all of the insulation pads were made with the cut out.  If you look at the hood bracing, you can see where the brace itself is contoured for the a/c compressor pulley and the cutout in the insulation.  Based on the way the hood brace is contoured, I'd say that all of the Rivieras, a/c or non-a/c came with the cutout in the insulation.  Best guess.

 

Ed

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