Sign in to follow this  
Fred Zwicker

Body Off or Frame Off?

Recommended Posts

this is why i haven't done a body off frame up or off or whatever restoration. at least that is my excuse now. besides... i'm just not into it that much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I guess that since I had to dig my 1931 Dodge engine out of the ground, mine will be considered a "from the ground up" restoration?

Dude, if you had simply flipped your car over to start disassembly you would have to take the "frame off" the body.:rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok next debate....

If you keep on traveling east, when will you reach the east? And what will lie east of you then?

FYI, the International dateline is what determines east from west. Alaska is the easternmost, westernmost and northernmost state in the United States.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the longest time, all I heard was "Frame Off Restoration" or "Ground Up Restoration" when referring to restoring a car inside & out, top to bottom..

Hey, another technical term for a restoration, "Inside & Out, Top to Bottom"...lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

stealthbob

that is a good one

If you keep on traveling east, when will you reach the east? And what will lie east of you then?

However remember east is a direction not a destination, therefor you can NOT reach east, you can only travel east, and continuously do so and never stop, east will always be east of you and you will continue to travel east until you decide to stop traveling east, and at that point east will still be east of you. Travel on...

Oh yeah, and if you guys have nothing else to do and want to figure out if it is a frame off or body off, or ground up, inside out, or outside in, I have a 1930 Chevrolet universal that needs all and any of these, and you ALL are welcome to come by and debate while we all work and knock this one out . . .

Edited by BearsFan315 (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When doing a frame up restoration do you ignore the suspension, wheels, etc ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread illustrates poor use of specific terms and it has become rampant. The worst are the use of "restoration" by people who should know better (BJ auctions are the worst!) A '34 Terraplane with a Hemi is NOT a restoration! Others mislabel parts as NOS, NORS (NORS is a BS marketing moniker, new old REPRODUCTION stock part, HUH?), reproduction, replacement are all technical terms meant to accurately describe the part. Some things don't really matter that much but the difference between a true NOS part and a repop part are miles apart.

IMNSHO, Body off resto is far more detailed and complete than body on which omits much of what's hidden below because of different considerations. Frame up resto is the same as frame off, It is a resto that includes the frame and it's components.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stealthbob

that is a good one

However remember east is a direction not a destination, therefor you can NOT reach east, you can only travel east, and continuously do so and never stop, east will always be east of you and you will continue to travel east until you decide to stop traveling east, and at that point east will still be east of you. Travel on...

Kinda my point, there is NO end in this "Frame off" or any other abuse of car lexicon debate. It seems to me its a destination that doesn't exist?

We keep heading East but when do we actually get there, and how do we know it? crazy_pilot.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I said on another post, how about "line bore" vs "align bore"? I believe line bore is correct but align bore sounds better in a sales pitch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I guess that since I had to dig my 1931 Dodge engine out of the ground, mine will be considered a "from the ground up" restoration?

The term "ground up" just cracks me up. When I was a little guy I thought is was GRIND UP and all I could imagine was something like a giant meat grinder full of car parts that would, well,...grind them up before the restoration could start. Even as a kid I could never understand why anyone would want to do that. I still remember when I realized it meant restoration from the ground up. The owner (nicely) corrected me after I asked him if he had done a grind up restoration. :o

I can laugh about it now, but was awfully embarassed at the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We keep heading East but when do we actually get there, and how do we know it? crazy_pilot.gif

And, if you're standing at the North Pole, no matter which way you walk, you'll be going east

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And, if you're standing at the North Pole, no matter which way you walk, you'll be going east

You would be going south.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Years ago, "Frame Up" restoration was the term most oft used. "Body Off" restoration came somewhat later, then the two seemed to get tangled and confused sometime perhaps in the eighties.

I agree with you - "Frame Up" restoration is the best description.

"Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes - that way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.":)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Geeze, Fred, you know how to start something don't you.

Congrats on the perfect restoration. Glad I could be a part of it. I assume 400/400 points means that it must be perfect, right? (I bet that question won't go unanswered)

Body off, frame off, jargon smargon, just add a couple of words and say "they 'took the body off the frame' and spent 3 times what the thing will ever be worth to restore it".

While we're having so much fun with words, can anybody explain to this simpleton the spelling of "of" as "off" when someone says "That is a one of car" designed and built for Mr Deeppockets. They clearly say "one of" in speaking but when written it is nearly always spelled "one off". Aren't they just shortening their sentence by omitting "a kind". It is a 'one of a kind' car so why say or write OFF? The only time I could understand it being "one off" is if it were "one (car) off the assembly line to receive that size engine" or similar sentence. I'm sure there is some grammatical explanation for this I am just not getting so will be glad to have it explained to me.

Edited by MrEarl (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You would be going south.
DOH!!!!!! Brain fade

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cute thread. While we are discussing strange terms I have to ask Helfen this:

What the heck is an "Auction TV Expert"???

I would argue there is no such thing... :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
Cute thread. While we are discussing strange terms I have to ask Helfen this:

What the heck is an "Auction TV Expert"???

I would argue there is no such thing... :D

These are the EXPERT guy's on a show like Barrett/Jackson who do the commentary of the cars on the auction block. I'm sure you know or have heard them say; I had a 1966 Pontiac GTO or Olds 442 and it had a Powerglide two speed, when most real car people know for 1966 they came with a Super Turbine 300. I really fell off my chair when they had a 59 Bonneville up there and one of them said that the Tri Tone interior with the stars embossed on the door panels and seatbacks and the silver aluminum lurex thread in the carpet was something the owner added as a customization to the interior, when all along they came that way from the factory. In the case of a Uni-body 64 Polara they were examining for our viewing pleasure they said; "It's a very good body off restoration!" That's when I reached for the remote.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We used the term "Total Restoration" meaning that every part got repaired or replaced.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree that "frame up" has somehow morphed into "frame off". Ground up and frame up seem to me to be interchangeable. The modern terms "nut and bolt" {restoration} and "needs restored" drive me nuts. It's not like the old days where you paid for advertising by the word. Please use at least complete phrases if not complete sentences. if not a " nut and bolt" restoration then what? ..."all welded construction" , I hope not.

Greg in Canada

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
I agree that "frame up" has somehow morphed into "frame off". Ground up and frame up seem to me to be interchangeable. The modern terms "nut and bolt" {restoration} and "needs restored" drive me nuts. It's not like the old days where you paid for advertising by the word. Please use at least complete phrases if not complete sentences. if not a " nut and bolt" restoration then what? ..."all welded construction" , I hope not.

Greg in Canada

My understanding is body off or body off the frame, frame up or frame and everything above, ground up, simply meant everything redone. Body on or frame on ( with the exception of a uni body) is sometimes used to describe a car not completely restored, leaving out the frame, engine,trans, rear end and ft. & rear suspension and underside of the body. In other words from the rockers up. When someone says restored-my impression/expectation is everything redone.

D.

Edited by helfen (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let's simplify this and say that regardless of what anyone calls the degree of wok they've performed, it's always prudent to check it inside and out, upside and down, to confirm what was touched, painted, chromed, stripped, restored, replaced, replicated, NOS, survivor, original or like new. Everyone has different opinions on what each term mean even tho, oddly, we all know what a total restoration is and is not. If only sellers could learn to cummunicate the same way they did when they were simply buyers themselves or collectors, we wouldn't have these problems. That's why I prefer the term "I just drive it till it breaks."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this