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Dating an early White truck.


Dandy Dave
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Dave :

 I was thinking of you while we did a turn through the AACA Museum yesterday. They have a 1912 White with a bus body on display. A few photos. And yes, left hand drive.

DSCF6506.thumb.JPG.c87b7835c361a1eb392b163367d598c7.JPGDSCF6507.thumb.JPG.14e34bffb0cf7a13064ce65fe3393759.JPGSorry about the poor quality of this shoe I had to hold the camera over my head as there was a rope. blocking access.

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Update on the Truck. Success! I went though the lubricator yesterday and got it cleaned out and working. Then late in the day I was able to get it to fire up for about a minute. Hits on all four cylinders and no knocks or rattles. Freed up the left rear wheel brake this morning. Three days of freeing up stuck and rusted stuff and this 92 year old truck is nearly ready to drive. Dandy Dave!   

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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18 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

I'm with Carl on the shock theory. Bob ......................................Just wondering why one would carry a spare solid rubber tire? 

 

See the source image

There were a small number of hard rubber detachable rims. They are definitely the minority compared to the standard type which required a large press to remove and install. It's hard to see if the spare in the photo is the detachable type or not , however the wheels that can be seen on the two trucks look like they have press on style tires. I have most of a dual detachable set up but it is buried in my storage shed.  They look like the front wheels on this hard rubber GMC. The bolts just inside the tire hold the outer flat appearing steel wedge ring in place. Overall the concept is very similar to Firestone detachable Peu. rims for wood wheel cars.

Greg

1912-gmc-truck-chassis-with-custom-beverage-delivery-body.jpg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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18 hours ago, 1912Staver said:

That's amazing. How long do you figure it is since it last ran ? 

 

Greg

 

I would not be surprised if the last time it ran was around WWII. The only thing I found that they would have parked it for was a broken off block drain that is in the front of the engine block just behind the fan. I would surmise that whoever had it did not know how to get the broken piece out. It only took me minutes to remove it. A little heat from a torch and an E-Z out and the threaded brass piece came right out. It had to be in a barn or shed back in those years or the War Board would have made them scrap it. I can just visualize the building it was in falling down around it. Even though it's rough, It would be a lot worse if it had always been left outside. Dandy Dave!   

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5 hours ago, dibarlaw said:

Bob:

Dave can tell you about midnight scrappers who made off with a radiator from one of his pieces of equipment.

 

 

And picking up a replacement for him in and I do not even remember what state I picked it up in.  I think it might have been in Northern Michigan.

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On ‎1‎/‎3‎/‎2018 at 5:09 PM, dibarlaw said:

Bob:

Dave can tell you about midnight scrappers who made off with a radiator from one of his pieces of equipment.

 

I remember that story, it was on this forum along with a photo if my memory is correct. Dave and I go back to the $2,000 Stoddard Dayton days.  Bob 

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On ‎1‎/‎2‎/‎2018 at 7:06 PM, SC38DLS said:

Not sure this is a "White" but it is a good size log. Parked outside an active logging company in central KY I drove by today

 

log t1.JPG

Can't see the nose, But I think this is a White Mustang. Around a 1950.

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14 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

I remember that story, it was on this forum along with a photo if my memory is correct. Dave and I go back to the $2,000 Stoddard Dayton days.  Bob 

I got $3,200 for the remains of the Stoddard Dayton Bob. It went to the state of Colorado. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 1/3/2018 at 5:38 AM, Restorer32 said:

As pictured and explained in my early Dyke's Manual. Sorry I can't tell you which edition but teens or early 1920's.

 

There is a cut-away drawing of  Westinghouse shockers in Dyke's 14th edition.

 

That (1925) edition also has several pages of info on the early White trucks,  including excellent schematic drawings of the chassis and rear axle. 

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Just goes to show that you can never tell a book by it's cover. Sometimes the rusty ones run the best. Say JCRIV, Have you ever gone to the National Pike Steam, Gas and Horse Association Show. It's out your way. Dandy Dave! 

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19 minutes ago, Dandy Dave said:

Just goes to show that you can never tell a book by it's cover. Sometimes the rusty ones run the best. Say JCRIV, Have you ever gone to the National Pike Steam, Gas and Horse Association Show. It's out your way. Dandy Dave! 

Absolutely DD. The first time was about 5 years ago with the antique motorcycles and after that wife and I go back almost every year as long as its not raining. What an awesome experience. All young kids should have to go to that event and be taught about the equipment that built this country and the effort (and risk in many cases) it took to operate it. Acres of all types of old equipment in operation moving dirt all for demonstration. Not to mention all the tractors, trucks and every steam powered device one can imagine. To boot the food is good and not overpriced.

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I have displayed my little shovel there once. Would like to go back again. I built that little shovel from scrap and discarded parts. None of it was originally manufactured to be a small shovel. Dandy Dave! 

 

 

18 hours ago, JZRIV said:

Absolutely DD. The first time was about 5 years ago with the antique motorcycles and after that wife and I go back almost every year as long as its not raining. What an awesome experience. All young kids should have to go to that event and be taught about the equipment that built this country and the effort (and risk in many cases) it took to operate it. Acres of all types of old equipment in operation moving dirt all for demonstration. Not to mention all the tractors, trucks and every steam powered device one can imagine. To boot the food is good and not overpriced.

 

IMG_1584.JPG

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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  • 2 months later...
On ‎2018‎-‎01‎-‎22 at 7:36 AM, JV Puleo said:

I like the winterfront too. You hardly ever see them even though they must have been very common.

Winter fronts are quite unusual on hard rubber era trucks. They only traveled at 10-12 MPH so there wasn't a great deal of airflow even at full speed. Blocking or restricting that airflow did not have nearly as much influence on engine temp. as on a 30 MPH automobile.  Most I have seen are a simple canvas screen that can be slid up or down across the front of the radiator.  A full metal one like on this White is definitely unusual . It looks substantial enough that it is probably a White factory Assy. for extreme winter conditions. I wonder if it is listed in the White parts book ?

 

Greg in Canada

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Not sure on the front being factory, but it is a guard and not a winter front. A few have told me it may have been used for logging and the front helped protect the radiator in the harsh environment that working in the woods had to offer. I have acquired a parts book for the truck and I don't see it listed. Dandy Dave!  

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