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Dating an early White truck.


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I stumbled on an early White truck recently. I am fairly sure it is between 1913 and 1915 as it has left hand drive. It looks to be a small model as it is about the size of a TT Ford. Can anyone tell me where the serial number would be located on the early White trucks? And if anyone has a list that would tell me a year. I did not have my camera, but the next time I get back to where it is I will take some photos and post them. Thanks, Dandy Dave!

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I dated a White truck once and she was noisy, hungry all the time, and needed expensive accessories. She was also kind of slow, but her beauty made up for it, and she was pretty useful for lifting heavy stuff.

But boy, I'm sure glad I didn't marry her!

:P

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I dated a White truck once and she was noisy, hungry all the time, and needed expensive accessories. She was also kind of slow, but her beauty made up for it, and she was pretty useful for lifting heavy stuff.

But boy, I'm sure glad I didn't marry her!

:P

Better than a Mack Bulldog!

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I dated a White truck once and she was noisy, hungry all the time, and needed expensive accessories. She was also kind of slow, but her beauty made up for it, and she was pretty useful for lifting heavy stuff.

But boy, I'm sure glad I didn't marry her!

:P

I dated a John Deere A tractor once. All she did was pull stuff around and putt, putt, putter all day. It took a lot of fuel to get her warmed up..... ;) Dandy Dave!

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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hi dave, i have a 1918 white 5 ton model and information i got from the whitetruck club was that the serial number was stamped ontop of the cross member nearest the front of the gearbox, in the middle of the member, but they also told me a lot of chassis had no serial numbers stamped on to them, and i havent been able to find any on my truck, there was also a body tag attached to the wooden bulkhead that had serial number and model of truck but from pictures i've seen these tags may have started been put on just before the twenties?? plus they would be very easy to remove once the truck had fallen into disrepair, hope this is of some help, good luck, mike.

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I got the diease bad. I think this is turning into another rescue mission. I can't seem to help myself, I'll even sell the old lady and my grandmothers ( yep, both of them,...God rest there souls.) to have it in my garage... OK gang. Here is some photos, soooo what year is it???

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Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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White did not start to stamp the frame until 1917 or so, the data plate is the only way to positively identify the year. This truck has a GK 30 hp motor and the no. is stamped on a rear leg, White did not use motors in no. sequence so motor no. is only a guess of year. No 27000 was produced in 1915 and 127000 in 1925 recheck number to see if the 1 is part of number. Whites are visually the same up to the early 20s. This is a Model 15 3/4 ton truck, earlier known as a model GBBE.

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White did not start to stamp the frame until 1917 or so, the data plate is the only way to positively identify the year. This truck has a GK 30 hp motor and the no. is stamped on a rear leg, White did not use motors in no. sequence so motor no. is only a guess of year. No 27000 was produced in 1915 and 127000 in 1925 recheck number to see if the 1 is part of number. Whites are visually the same up to the early 20s. This is a Model 15 3/4 ton truck, earlier known as a model GBBE.

I did not see any numbers on the frame. These number are taken from the brass plate on the fire wall. Ummmmm..... How about a photo.... I thought for sure this was pre 16 with no starter, generator, and still with gas lights. From what you are telling me, it is most likely a 1925 then??? I guess White was late on getting a modern electric starter, generator, and battery. Even behind Henry Ford's Tin Lizzy. If it was pre 16 I'd be all over it..... 1925 slows me down a little. Guess I'll step back and take off the rose colored glasses. Dandy Dave!

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Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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And I thought you were talking about some broad...

Old trucks are better. They don't talk back unless you start them up, and then they only sing that sweet sound that is music to my ears. They only require money if you decide to spend it on them and, they never, ever, ever, run off with your credit card. Also they never complain about how much you drink. (Water or otherwize.) Or about how many cigars you smoke, or how many other trucks you look at. And you never have to pull over when you are on a mission because they have to pee.... Dandy Dave!

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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As far as Trucks go Whites are amongst the best. Truck technology did not progress as fast as automobiles. The biggest step forward was pneumatic tires and that did not happen until at least the mid 20's for most makes and sizes of trucks. The larger the truck the later solids were used. Electric equipment was also in common use much later on Trucks compared to Automobiles. Quite a few trucks prior to 1925 or so lacked electric equipment. Most early truck guys would jump at the White you have found, they are becoming quite hard to find. Especially in the more manageable smaller sizes.

Greg in Canada {1918 Packard 2 ton}

P.S. the pre/ post 1915 thing isnt a big deal with early trucks . They are usually too slow for most HCCA tours . The ATHS is the big organisation and at their events every early truck is special.

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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  • 5 years later...

Dave,

 

Good for you.  Welcome to the truck world.  It will be interesting to see how fast that new iron will run when you change the plugs and add some fresh gas to the tank.  I am sure it was running when parked.


Larry

 

PS: don't forget to check the oil and coolant.  :)

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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22 minutes ago, Dandy Dave said:

It has a lost oil system Larry. The aluminum tank on the dash above the steering column is where the oil goes. I hope it is slow so it makes a good parade vehicle. The 1915 Buick roadster is too fast. Have to clutch it too often.

 

Lost oil system like my Model F.

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Dave :

 Congratulations on the White. I really love these early trucks. There was a somewhat fixed up short WB one here in Chambersburg for many years that sold at auction back in the 90s. I do not know where it went. As a boy in the early 1960s, West Elizabeth Lumber Co.(PA.) had a restored 1920s 2-3 ton Stake bed with their gold leaf lettering on the oak stake boards. I always begged my father to drive past their show room window to see the bright red truck on our way up to route 51 going to Pittsburgh.

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Backed the trailer into a heated shop with the old White on it this morning. Freeing up some of the rusted brake rods and other linkages, Got the gate shift transmission to loosen up. Pulled the trans top cover and it is very clean inside. Cleaned the carburetor and checked the mag for spark. It's got it. Going to pull the plugs this afternoon and see if there are any stuck valves. Also going to pull any cavity drain plugs and drain any water that may be present. Some more tinkering and this old girl may start up and actually run. Stay tuned. Dandy Dave!    

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There are a couple of places that can vulcanise new tires on to the metal base rings. Quite expensive but once done they will outlive any owner. Many forklifts use similar tires but most of the places that do the ones for forklifts are not set up for tires as large as a truck requires. Definitely a big ticket process. 

 

Greg

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