Jump to content

TV Show - FAST 'N LOUD


Dosmo

Recommended Posts

The Gas Monkey Garage relocated yesterday to its new leased space, a much bigger place about 5 minutes away from our shop. They are in a large warehouse-type facility and will have plenty of room to work on their cars, plus several offices (and multiple bathrooms, something they were missing at our shop!). So, my husband finally has his shop back after almost a year of being overrun by the TV show production. Now maybe he can go back to trying to earn a living, since he wasn't making much of one with all the distractions and stuff in the way all the time. He has learned a LOT about what goes into a reality TV show, and he would never agree to something like this again without getting hugely compensated for it.

Now, he and a friend are going to try to occasionally "flip" cars themselves. They found a 1953 Chevy Sedan Delivery and have got it up and running and listed on Ebay for sale. They're hoping to make a little on it, then find something else they can fix up and sell, and so on. The friend has the money to buy the cars in the first place, and Dewaine has the know-how to fix them up the right way.

The Discovery people flew Richard, Aaron, and Sue (the upholstery lady) out to Los Angeles last week to film commercials for season 2 of the show, and they are planning to spend a good bit of money promoting it. New episodes should be airing next month. They say ("they" being Richard, Aaron, and the production folks) that they will still bring cars to Dewaine to work on and still film at our shop from time to time, but we'll see how that works out now that they will have a place that's not literally right next door. I'm also interested to see how the new place looks on TV. Right now, it's pretty sterile looking --- certainly nothing like the "vintage" look that our shop has. This year is our shop's 40th year in business ... That is "vintage" for you, isn't it?!

Here's a picture of that Sedan Delivery we've got for sale. They put it on Ebay with a $3,000 starting bid.

post-53904-143139329756_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

They should make a "reality" show about the car hobby by forcing the audience to sit through one hour (really only 42 minutes) of block sanding. No throwing parts around the shop or arguing with each other. Just guide coat, block sand, guide coat, block sand.........

Then the audience would get a better idea of how "fun" the hobby is. Not complaining, though. It truly is the best hobby, just not quite as exciting as they would have you believe.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 weeks later...

One of the show's fans has a hotrod blog and after visiting the shop because he was a fan of "Fast N' Loud," he asked my husband for an interview. The resulting article is found here:

What you may not know about Gas Monkey Garage | Hotrods and Ratrods

It's primarily about our shop, and my late father-in-law. The shop has quite a history, and if you like funny cars, hotrods, etc, you might enjoy reading about it. We were very pleased with the overall piece, as it shows how much my husband admired his dad.

New episodes of the show begin this Monday. I don't think my husband is on the first episode, but you might spot him (or me, or even our son) in a commercial for the show right before it comes on; we had a party at the shop and filmed us doing a "count down" to the new show.

Things have settled back down at our place quite a bit, although people still stop by almost daily asking to see the shop because of the show.

Link to post
Share on other sites

These types of shows are all garbage. They are anathema to what the AACA represents. They depict the dismemberment and destruction of the core of our hobby. They are not automotive enthuiasts, rather they rape and pilliage the antique automobile landscape as they weave a path of destruction across our country. I wouldn't watch one of these shows if you paid me.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

I understand all the negativity, but I'm still tickled pink by our involvement in this show. My husband was on several times last night, and it is always beyond cool to see him on TV. He worked on the 1954 Bel Air, and spoke to the man who eventually bought it (Richard said Dewaine is not a car salesman, and that's true ... He is honest to a fault). He also worked on the Model A they bought and spoke to the Swede who ended up buying it. And then they showed our 1951 Ford when Magnus (the other Swede) came to look at the Galaxie. Aaron told Magnus, "This Ford's not for sale [meaning our car], but here's a Ford that is." It's fun to see our cars and our shop featured in the show so prominently. I don't know how many more episodes before they show them actually moving to their new place, but we'll enjoy it while it lasts.

We were really thrilled when the local ABC station brought a news crew out to talk to Dewaine; that was some nice local publicity for us. The show itself hasn't really helped our business at all because it's not a local show (and most people who watch it don't live close enough to bring cars to us to work on), and because of all the hubbub that goes along with filming a TV show (more distraction than anything else), so it was nice to have some local publicity for a change.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I sure hope it has an upside for you guys at Phipps Auto.

If nothing else, it's a once in a lifetime experience to have been involved in something like this.

I did see Dewaine on channel 8 news a while back (yes, I'm local to you but don't have any old cars...my old stuff all has two wheels). I thought it was great that they came out and had him on.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I guess this is a relatively new entry into the car restoration programming genre. The only episode I've watched shows two guys who run a garage buying a 1930 Model A 2dr Sedan that has been stored since 1957. It is original and solid, and does run. They take the body off the frame, add new suspension, juice brakes and larger diameter wheels. When they put it back together, they leave off the fenders, creating a sort of 50s custom rod look.

During the show, they stop at a junkyard and while looking at a 49 or 50 Chevy, they misidentify it as a 52. They end up buying a 53 Chevy 210 2 dr Sedan. They also buy a 64 Buick Riviera full of bullet holes that was driven in a movie by Nicolas Cage.

I'm still forming my opinion about the show. I don't particularly care for what they did to the Model A - but, it did look pretty cool when it was finished. They tried to sell the 53 Chevy at a local car show, but had no takers. They did sell the Riv to a guy for a small profit.

The lead character is a tatted-up, fast-talking guy that regularly spits out phrases like "Kick-Axx", "Bad-Axx", etc. Sort of like he's trying just a little too hard to be cool. One thing I did NOT see is the sort of manufactured drama on other such shows where you have personal issues between two people, i.e., don't agree on something, can't get along. Of course, I've only seen the one show, so that isn't a lot to go on. I'm bothered by the fact that these two guys misidentified that 49/50 Chevy as a 52. It seems like the people that put produce these shows should realize their target audience is mainly car buffs who are going to catch stuff like that. That is a huge turn-off to me.

It is broadcast on the Discovery Channel.

I dislike anyone who takes an origional car and destroys it making it into a hotrod...There are to many fiberglass bodys and material around to buy rather than destroy something that cannot b replaced.
Link to post
Share on other sites
Follows the same tired format all these shows follow.

1. Find car.

2. Create unreasonable deadline to fix it up. Usually less than 10 days.

3. Take it to auction.

4. Note the amount of money spent, and what the profit or loss is.

Right on. Garbage in -- Garbage out.

Realitiy TV is garbage. Get out to the garage and do something constructive.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't generally watch television but I was away on business and staying in a hotel last weekend. Having no energy left, I actually watched 10 minutes of this show. That was more than enough. If I thought those idiots were representative of the old car world, I'd take up collecting ... you name it... almost anything.

Link to post
Share on other sites

We have Memorable Entertainment TV in my area. I like the simple shows like Bob Newhart. At the beginning the phone rings and he very calmly answers "Hello?"

A couple of nights ago I was cracking up. I told my wife, imagine that scene if that idiot with the metal detector from the History Channel had the phone ring.

Anyone ever read Breakfast of Champions by Vonnegut? I remember a part where a couple of those guys were killed with a golf club.

Bernie

Link to post
Share on other sites
Follows the same tired format all these shows follow.

1. Find car.

2. Create unreasonable deadline to fix it up. Usually less than 10 days.

3. Take it to auction.

4. Note the amount of money spent, and what the profit or loss is.

Good distillation of the formula!

I might add to step #2:

"Play up drama of grouchy boss interacting with abused worker bees."

Wasn't Boyd Coddington the original inventor of that? He should be getting royalties.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

What I've wondered about, is when they go to sell a car, and they go for a ride, the prospective buyer never drives the car... What the hey is that about???? When I buy a car, I'm the one in the drivers seat doing the driving, not the seller.. Maybe it's because of the driveability Mopar cited, and it's a lousy driver.

Is there some other reason the buyers don't drive the car? Is there some rule in Texas about the owner has to drive the car? I just can't help but wonder.......

Link to post
Share on other sites

I will continue to watch the show, it's fun to watch grown men get stupid. At my age, it remind's me of what we kid's used to do at the corner gas station. Sure, it bother's me when they torch something that's not replaceable, but I also ask myself...where would that car be in a few year's? So far, they haven't hidden the downside of what old car's have instore for a restorer. Watching the car's get cleaned up is nerve wracking, one reason we all hate mice, since everything in texas is big...they have rat's. I do wonder what they do with the old engine's they don't use, usually "stuck". Not a fan of hot rod's, per se, but the 59 Ford turned out pretty nice.

IMO the 59 ford was customized, not hot rodded. I also keep in mind, what change's are the new owner's going to do with these car's; since their not in a field somewhere decaying.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
I am not a fan of rat rods and not a fan of "Reality TV" but this one was tolerable until the Woodill episode. I was practically screaming at the TV and ended up nearly in tears at what they did to that car. True, they didn't remove the entire suspension and throw in a SBC, but they took what was a 1 of 9 car (or 1 of 15 originally, not counting the 185 sold as kits) and destroyed it's originality. They spent roughly $90,000 to turn a $10,000 profit, when a quality detail (and MAYBE recovering the seats, I couldn't tell but thought I saw damage on the driver's seat) would have easily produced nearly the same profit or more while retaining the originality of the car. Just bad business if you ask me. If they want to modify a '57 Chevy or '32 Ford, that is a totally different story as there were millions made and they are still making them today. :)

I do like that the show doesn't follow the same formula of most of these shows. They don't repeat themselves over and over again and avoid the petty arguments for the sake of drama.

They do seem to know what they are doing, other than listing a car they haven't started on yet in an auction 5 days away. That's just insane and obviously leads to shoddy workmanship. I did find it funny that the same guys that fear nothing when cutting a frame in half to add a larger engine need to hire Dewaine to put in a set of points for them. :)

I think they tend to overpay for the starter cars in many situations as well, but I'm sure if someone came to buy one of my cars with a TV crew in tow, the price would probably go up as well!

Overall, a decent show considering the other alternatives, but I have lost all respect for Richard after he butchered the Woodill. $20,000 for wire wheels? I live in a different world...

The original Top Gear is an excellent show. I couldn't make it through 1 episode of the dumbed down US version.

I know this is an old thread but I just saw this episode.Can anyone verify that Daytona wire wheels with the tires cost $20,000 for the set?I looked on EBay and a set of wires are $1399.00 for the 4 rims.Where does this show get its prices? How can they charge $7000.00 dollars for a paint job that only took 1 or 2 days? Does anybody have any inside information about this?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I see such a hate on and angst to what these guys are doing...agree or disagree fine but there is nothing actually wrong with what they do just because you personally disagree with it.

I personally would like all cars restored original, I am following that with my own projects. I also like the freedom to live and do what I like, legally, in my civil society.

Next up, the hate on for Jackson Barrett auction as its starts this week, its always something right?

I get that is is a preservationist site and my comments are tongue in cheek for the most part but like all you guys say: The shows are predictable and scripted...well so are these purist hate on everything non "pure" threads.

Just sayin....

Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not going to vouch for 100% of what they end up showing on TV, but they did lose big at the Tulsa auction; we were in the shop when they got back that night, and they were really unhappy about how it had all gone. I remember in particular that Aaron told us that night, "It was all bottom feeders or people after the really expensive cars, and nothing in between" (which is where they thought they'd find a buyer). Richard is still trying to figure out which auctions are best for which cars, and which days/nights are best to bring his stuff across the stage for the kind of buyer who might actually want one of his cars. It's a game, and he's played it for a long time, but the dynamics have changed in the past few years, and the pressure of the deadlines the show has imposed on him have also changed how particular he can be about which auctions he can go to. They can't sit around on the cars for very long waiting for the perfect auction to come along, because they've got to wrap up filming on each episode.

I'm sure the money situation is better for him now that there's a TV show involved, but I don't get into those types of details with him, because (unfortunately) it doesn't involve our business.

Is reality TV 100% real? Of course not; "dramatic license" is taken on all of them, scenes have to be re-shot, things have to be re-staged, etc. All I can vouch for in terms of how "real" this show is would be the work being done on the cars. I'm not there when they buy or sell them, so all I know about that in terms of how much they spend/get is what I hear (and as I said above, I heard directly from them about how badly they did in Tulsa). But we do see the work involved, which is one of the main focuses of the show, and it's all done there. This is what these guys do, and it's what they've always done. Not everybody likes their choices or their work, and that's also always been the case. But at least they are getting some cool cars onto the show on a weekly basis and maybe firing up some viewers' passion for working on some old car themselves and doing it their own way.

I have to say one thing I like about the show is that they have 3 or 4 different cars on each show. The shows that concéntrate on one car for the whole episode can get boring.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I totally agree with ktm858's post #126, above. These guys (appropriately named Monkeys) should be flipping burgers at a fast food restaurant, rather than destroying vintage autos for fun and profit for a reality TV show producer. Grandpa

Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel no moral obligation to "tolerate" behavior that I equate with vandalism just like I'm not particularly "tolerant" of the nitwits that spray paint gang slogans on the walls of my shop. It isn't "artistic expression"... its vandalism. No one is saying they can't do what they want with their cars... or that people who are entertained by their juvenile antics can't watch them, but I see their rubbish as the lowest common denominator version of my own life long interests. I wouldn't give any of them the right time of day and, were they taken to represent the "car collecting" world, I would be embarrassed to be part of it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I see such a hate on and angst to what these guys are doing...agree or disagree fine but there is nothing actually wrong with what they do just because you personally disagree with it.

I personally would like all cars restored original, I am following that with my own projects. I also like the freedom to live and do what I like, legally, in my civil society.

Next up, the hate on for Jackson Barrett auction as its starts this week, its always something right?

I get that is is a preservationist site and my comments are tongue in cheek for the most part but like all you guys say: The shows are predictable and scripted...well so are these purist hate on everything non "pure" threads.

Just sayin....

Some folks are Haters .....
Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...