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TV Show - FAST 'N LOUD


Dosmo

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I guess this is a relatively new entry into the car restoration programming genre. The only episode I've watched shows two guys who run a garage buying a 1930 Model A 2dr Sedan that has been stored since 1957. It is original and solid, and does run. They take the body off the frame, add new suspension, juice brakes and larger diameter wheels. When they put it back together, they leave off the fenders, creating a sort of 50s custom rod look.

During the show, they stop at a junkyard and while looking at a 49 or 50 Chevy, they misidentify it as a 52. They end up buying a 53 Chevy 210 2 dr Sedan. They also buy a 64 Buick Riviera full of bullet holes that was driven in a movie by Nicolas Cage.

I'm still forming my opinion about the show. I don't particularly care for what they did to the Model A - but, it did look pretty cool when it was finished. They tried to sell the 53 Chevy at a local car show, but had no takers. They did sell the Riv to a guy for a small profit.

The lead character is a tatted-up, fast-talking guy that regularly spits out phrases like "Kick-Axx", "Bad-Axx", etc. Sort of like he's trying just a little too hard to be cool. One thing I did NOT see is the sort of manufactured drama on other such shows where you have personal issues between two people, i.e., don't agree on something, can't get along. Of course, I've only seen the one show, so that isn't a lot to go on. I'm bothered by the fact that these two guys misidentified that 49/50 Chevy as a 52. It seems like the people that put produce these shows should realize their target audience is mainly car buffs who are going to catch stuff like that. That is a huge turn-off to me.

It is broadcast on the Discovery Channel.

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I caught this show by accident this weekend and left with the impression that if you took any regular thread from the H.A.M.B and made it into a television show, this is what it would look like. It reinforced why we don't subscribe to cable.

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Follows the same tired format all these shows follow.

1. Find car.

2. Create unreasonable deadline to fix it up. Usually less than 10 days.

3. Take it to auction.

4. Note the amount of money spent, and what the profit or loss is.

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I may watch a few minutes of it while flipping through the channels. When the butchering starts, I can't take it. Like the 49-50 Olds Gary F made mention of. I believe thats the one they just sanded a little and sprayed clear over the rust to "preserve the patina".

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I caught this show by accident this weekend and left with the impression that if you took any regular thread from the H.A.M.B and made it into a television show, this is what it would look like. It reinforced why we don't subscribe to cable.

+1 on that, well said!

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The initial newpaper coverage of this show in the local DFW newspapers made it sound pretty neat. It was neat to see the shop of the "collector" they got the Riv from, though, with a plethora of Dodge E-body Challengers, a modified SuperBird, and the flathead Dodge on a trailer. Even funnier that the main guy was leaning on the Riv he was looking to buy and didn't know it!

I might not like what they do to the cars per se, but seeing something that's a lot better than "Overhaulin'" makes it feel like "a breath of fresh air". Kind of a mix between "Flip This House" and "Auction Hunters".

For a different kind of car restoration "show", head over to www.greenehdtv.com and check out the shows on the '55 Buick. "Reality Rides". That show hasn't been "bought" just yet, but it's now a few years old. The particular Buick IS real and can sometimes be seen at weekend car shows in the southern DFW area. Just as Gas Monkey is a real place, the shop that built this car is in the Red Oak area, south of Dallas. Although some items were upgraded on the Buick, I suspect it's more of the type of show that many car hobbyiests might like. Quite informative, too! Plus, Scotty is one of our North Texas Chapter, BCA members.

Enjoy!

NTX5467

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I watched the episode where they redid the 1950 Olds 88. Here is what I don't understand. They brought the car for about $7000 they then replace the engine, trany had the seats and inside all redone, new tire and wheels. They listed the car for $25,000 and sold it, but the guy who brought it said we would only buy it if the replaced the suspension with air ride. The cost about $6000, the shop owner said ok.

So here is what I don't understand. They brought the car for $7000, plus $6000 for the air ride, sold the car for $25,000 and made money. So that leaves $12,000 and out of that comes, the motor, had to cost $2000, the trany $1500, the inside $2000, tire and wheels $1500. All the parts they don't talk about and they made money.

'what is their labor rate? $5 an hour.

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I think they are both idiots for the most part.

The best thing I've seen on the show is when the money guy bought a mid-80's Caddy on the way to a sale, and made a profit without spending a dime on changing the car.

I like hot rods, but not what these dolts are doing.

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The fool who bought that 50 Olds should have his head checked for rocks. Nice, correctly restored cars done to high standards can be bought for same money and sometimes less. Though I will give it to him- his first ?? was "Where's the 303?"

Yup- manufactured drama for the masses, that gives them all the idea that that's how the car hobby really works.

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Tonight's show is entitled "Low Riding Lincoln". From TV Guide: "A '70 Lincoln Continental Mark III is turned into a muscle car...".

I won't be watching.

I did watch it and I want my hour back. Seriously they decide what they want to do, or what they think is cool and then try to sell it to someone else. So rather than saying, hey what will make us the most money on this car, lets chop the heck out of it and then try to sell it when we are done.

I find myself rooting against them both hoping they loose money on the deal.

I like the type of shows were they restore the car (overhauling) or make it a little more modern, but this is like watching butchers with a teenager's attitude.

Just felt like putting my two cents in.

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Tonight's show is entitled "Low Riding Lincoln". From TV Guide: "A '70 Lincoln Continental Mark III is turned into a muscle car...".

I won't be watching.

I did watch it and I want my hour back. Seriously they decide what they want to do, or what they think is cool and then try to sell it to someone else. So rather than saying, hey what will make us the most money on this car, lets chop the heck out of it and then try to sell it when we are done.

I find myself rooting against them both hoping they loose money on the deal.

I like the type of shows were they restore the car (overhauling) or make it a little more modern, but this is like watching butchers with a teenager's attitude.

Just felt like putting my two cents in.

I watched part of it. I couldn't bear to watch much of what they did to that Lincoln, which was a fine looking original car only needing a little TLC.

I felt sick when I saw them take a cutting torch to the frame to clearance it for the air bags. That was when I turned the channel and never looked back.

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This show is filmed on our property (see our Web site at Phipps Auto). We have 2 buildings, and our shop (a normal working shop, specializing in working on older and classic cars) is the front building, while the Gas Monkey Garage guy (Richard) rents the back building. The film crew has been here since January working on this show, and a lot of the cars they've worked on have spilled over into our shop. My husband, Dewaine, has worked on a couple of the cars for the show, but only in a minor way, and they have only shown him in 2 of the episodes so far, although we've heard that he will be shown in other episodes down the road. My husband's shop has been there for almost 40 years. Gas Monkey Garage has been renting the back building for about 3 or 4 years, I think. Richard seems to be outgrowing the space, though, so I wouldn't be surprised to see him move out and find his own place for next year, since it looks like this show will get a second season.

My husband does the type of work most of you would probably approve of -- fixing up old cars the "right way" rather than turning them into something they're not --- but he enjoys watching what the Gas Monkey guys do, too. He sees a place for both types of work, and buyers for both. The guy who bought the 1950 Olds drives it all the time; he never did get the air suspension, but he loves the car. The guy with the Model A also drives it a lot and brings it by the shop and is thrilled with it. We've known Aaron (the ZZ Top-looking guy) for several years, and he is really talented and has lots of great ideas and visions for projects; you should see what he can do to a motorcycle (and maybe you will on the show sometime).

We had no idea how the show would do when they first approached us late last year about filming at the shop. We were still kind of doubtful that it would ever happen, but once they got started, they liked what they had and kept going. What was supposed to be 6 episodes turned into 12 episodes. They will finish filming the last episode for this year in a couple of weeks. Finally, we might get most of our parking lot and shop back! For the past 2 or 3 weeks, we've had a number of "fans" stop by wanting to see where the show is filmed. I don't know whether any of that will translate into future business for our shop, but I sure hope so.

At the least, even though financially we have not gotten much out of this so far, it has been a real "experience" for my husband, and he has enjoyed the break from the daily grind. I hope at least some of you will give the show a chance.

PS: Please don't let our involvement with the show stop you from posting your opinions of it. It wasn't our concept, it's not our work for the most part, and you won't hurt our feelings if you don't like it!

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My husband does the type of work most of you would probably approve of -- fixing up old cars the "right way" rather than turning them into something they're not --- but he enjoys watching what the Gas Monkey guys do, too. He sees a place for both types of work, and buyers for both. The guy who bought the 1950 Olds drives it all the time; he never did get the air suspension, but he loves the car. The guy with the Model A also drives it a lot and brings it by the shop and is thrilled with it. We've known Aaron (the ZZ Top-looking guy) for several years, and he is really talented and has lots of great ideas and visions for projects; you should see what he can do to a motorcycle (and maybe you will on the show sometime).

At the least, even though financially we have not gotten much out of this so far, it has been a real "experience" for my husband, and he has enjoyed the break from the daily grind. I hope at least some of you will give the show a chance.

PS: Please don't let our involvement with the show stop you from posting your opinions of it. It wasn't our concept, it's not our work for the most part, and you won't hurt our feelings if you don't like it!

I do not mean any disrespect for your shop, I am of the opinion that there is a right way and a wrong way to do things. For me it is alot like a Rat rod. Sure they look cool at start, but you will have a super tough time of getting it back to original if you ever wanted to do so.

I inherited a 1933 ford pick up from my Dad, that he was always trying to fix up and restore my entire lifetime, I watched the show for pointers or for ideas on how to do certain things and am greatly disappointed that they cut up classics, all to put over sized tires on them.

In my opinion, classic cars and trucks look cooler if they look original and have modern parts in them say engine, brakes, steering. Things that improve what the designer had in mind, not chop the crap out of it......Still this is my opinion and I will most likely watch it so that I can hate it....:)

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I know you don't mean any disrespect to our shop --- like I said, our shop doesn't do this for a living. That's Gas Monkey. Ours is a "normal" shop, working on all years and makes and models of cars. Dewaine prefers older cars, and he's gotten a reputation among people in the area for being able to help restore classic cars and work on hot rods. If he could do only that for a living, he'd do it.

This is a picture from one of the 2 episodes that Dewaine has been in so far ... Scott (who works for the Gas Monkey Garage) brought a car to Dewaine to get his help in getting it ready in time. This car was one that a couple of Australian guys had bought, long-distance, and sent to Richard to fix up so they could drive it down Route 66. They loved the car and had a blast driving it, and they wrote a blog about the whole experience. Then they had the car shipped to Australia. Dewaine enjoyed the heck out of visiting with the Australians and took them for a very fast ride in his 1951 Ford, the fastest car we've got (it has a Cadillac motor in it).

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If the guys want to make the trip out to Abilene, my family has dozen of cars to sell. Many will go for scrap prices as that is what they will go for when taken to scrap yard. Property won't be available for cars much longer, and there isn't room for all of them. Corvair cars will be gone this weekend.

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I started off liking this show. I kind of cringed a bit when they cut up that Model A but I liked the fact that they kept the original engine. Aaron(bearded guy)talked a little bit about how they liked keeping the original engines in there and giving things more of a classic look and feel. I liked that. Later on, they even seemed genuinely upset when they had to replace the original engine in that Olds. But as the episodes have progressed, this has been shown to be untrue. This untruth culminated in the following quote from Richard from the latest episode. "You know me. I'm just gonna' mess it all up. I'm gonna' take some guys pride and joy, that's been in the family for years, and jack it all up!" It was at this point that I got kind of discouraged with the show. I thought it was going to be a classic/nostalgia hot rod sort of show but I guess in the end, they're just there to make money above all else. It is a business and I guess I understand that, but I was hoping this show would have a little more respect for the cars. I guess I was wrong.

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If the guys want to make the trip out to Abilene, my family has dozen of cars to sell. Many will go for scrap prices as that is what they will go for when taken to scrap yard. Property won't be available for cars much longer, and there isn't room for all of them. Corvair cars will be gone this weekend.

If you give me more details about what kinds of cars (or even some pictures), I can pass that info along.

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I'm gonna' take some guys pride and joy, that's been in the family for years, and jack it all up!"

The pattern with most of these shows now seems to be to glorify deviant behavior. The fact that they get the ratings to sustain themselves is a sad commentary on where we're going as a nation.

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"You know me. I'm just gonna' mess it all up. I'm gonna' take some guys pride and joy, that's been in the family for years, and jack it all up!"

That really bothered me too.

Overall, I have no problem with modified cars. I appreciate well done craftsmanship in any form.

I am a member over on the HAMB board, and am constantly awed at some of the beautiful work many of it's members do.

I'll say one thing, many of these guys will take a car that looks like it isn't worth it's weight in steel, a car that may be the shell left behind after restorers have pulled parts off of, and turn them into works of art.

I just have a real problem when an excellent original car, (or restored car) is cut up for modification.

But that's my personal opinion. What anyone does to a car they legally own is their own business.

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That really bothered me too.

Overall, I have no problem with modified cars. I appreciate well done craftsmanship in any form.

I am a member over on the HAMB board, and am constantly awed at some of the beautiful work many of it's members do.

I'll say one thing, many of these guys will take a car that looks like it isn't worth it's weight in steel, a car that may be the shell left behind after restorers have pulled parts off of, and turn them into works of art.

I just have a real problem when an excellent original car, (or restored car) is cut up for modification.

But that's my personal opinion. What anyone does to a car they legally own is their own business.

Amen brother, I totally agree with that.

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There's some on Pictures by txcars4sale - Photobucket

besides ones on there, there's also a '49 American Lafrance firetruck, bunch of late 40s/early 50s trucks, bunch of 49/54 Chevy coupes and sedans, a couple 47 Chevys, 41 Chevy business coupe, '50 Ford extended cab, etc.

Got it, thanks --- I am forwarding it to Richard. The only problem is that they have to wrap up filming by the 25th, and so I doubt he could get out there before then. They are scrambling (working all hours, day and night) to finish up right now, because this is one deadline they can't miss. (By the way, there's an old fire truck parked at the shop right now; I don't know if it makes it onto an episode or not, but it's awfully cool looking!)

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Cool, what kind of firetruck? Someone in town is selling a '42 GMC right now, but it's a big project. Well I know a lot of Corvairs are going this weekend. Not sure what my dad had planned for next week, but I may take some of my 80s cars. The Vega and EXP should be going off to new homes in a few weeks too. Still will be plenty of old iron left, but not sure for how long.

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Cool, what kind of firetruck? Someone in town is selling a '42 GMC right now, but it's a big project. Well I know a lot of Corvairs are going this weekend. Not sure what my dad had planned for next week, but I may take some of my 80s cars. The Vega and EXP should be going off to new homes in a few weeks too. Still will be plenty of old iron left, but not sure for how long.

A 1951 Bruco ... Yours sounds cool, too.

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Have to say that I watched last night, and Richard bugs me. Aaron on the other had, he is a worker and I respect that. So if there is a redeeming part of the show it is the hard work that they put in. Still not a big fan of chopping everything up, but that is just me.

I watched Richard dancing around while he was getting drunk and I thought yeah I don't like that guy. Meanwhile the crew are working around the clock.

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I watched the episode that involved a 71 Mark 3 Lincoln. Pulled from a lot. Good driver and looked great. It was dropped with airbags and 22 inch wheels put on. The cars looks was not improved with what they did.

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I saw the show last night with the Model A being painted chocolate. I must have missed something because they kept saying brining it back to that 40's look. I don't think I will watching this again.

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I watched the show where they rebuilt the 52 Ford Mainline that was sitting in a yard/field - it had been a 1960s era gasser, so they sort of brought it back to life. I wasn't bothered by that episode at all, since the car had already been butchered previously. I WAS bothered by the episode where they bought the 2nd owner 50 Olds coupe and switched out the original 303 that was supposedly seized. Then they did some cutting with a torch around the rear fender wells in order to get some wider wheels/tahrs to fit. The guy Richard seems to want everyone to think he is a sort of combination Fonzi meets the Beastie Boys type character. He runs his mouth way too much - his partner, Aaron, on the other hand, seems much easier for me to accept, even if the did remove the 303 from the Olds coupe. I'll probably watch a few more episodes, mainly because if you look at what else is on TV, this is still better than the great majority of it.

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Brandon was there (at our shop) yesterday and today, driving the 50 Olds that he bought from Richard ... lots of fans stopping by, and some of them got their pictures taken sitting in his car. He loves that car (although he does wish it had the 303 in it). My husband was in last night's new episode, working on a Cadillac, and he got the Trans Am that Richard bought up and running again. Here's a picture of Dewaine with the Caddy. And then today, shortly after we left (my 2 sons and I had stopped by to visit my husband), Charles Haley happened to drop by the shop; he has lived here since his days as a Dallas Cowboy. Would have made my youngest son's whole year if he'd had been there to meet him (he's a walking football encyclopedia despite being just 12 years old), but as it is, Haley was kind enough to take a picture with my husband and leave an autograph for our son. And yesterday, one of Richard's friends drove up in a Nash Healey. Most expensive car that's ever been at our shop! So, although the season's filming is about to wrap up (they have 1 week left, and then they'll be gone), it's been a thrill seeing some of the cars that have come through.

Our shop is almost 40 years old, and we've never had "fans" before, so this is a whole new experience for us. It will die down once filming stops, but it's been fun. We just hope we get some of the business that Richard and Gas Monkey Garage wouldn't want or don't have time for --- "normal" car repair and restoration. Our shop was cool way before they started renting the back building, and it'll still be cool long after they're gone.

PS: I think this week's episode was the last new episode for a few weeks (scheduling by Discovery Channel --- I think it has something to do with the upcoming Olympics). There are 6 more new episodes to show, but they won't air until beginning sometime in August. Also, Richard and Aaron are flying out to LA next week to be on the Jay Leno show. I know Leno loves cars, so that should be interesting.

UPDATE: Because there weren't going to be any new episodes for a few weeks, the Leno appearance has been postponed. I think the new episodes will begin airing in early September, but I don't know what day/time.

The show will be back on September 3rd, Labor Day, and will now air on Mondays (after American Choppers). Six more episodes had already been filmed on our property, and I guess a few more could be filmed there before Richard moves to his new building in a few weeks. He's outgrown our back building, so he found a bigger place down the road.

By the way, in that picture of Dewaine, he's tossing a part that the producers threw in there that didn't actually belong with the Caddy.

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  • 1 month later...

Watched the episode last night with the '64 Impala and was amazed (stupified, actually) with the one-day chassis rebuild. Loved the post-destruction paint job prior to the Air Ride component installation; the latter done to "make it safer." My only question is, does Costco sell Krylon Satin Black by the case? 'Cause I'm gonna have to get me some for my next project. It seems so easy; no scraping off the 48-years of road crud, oil and grease, just spray 'n' go!

Couldn't bear to watch more after they discovered the engine troubles.

TG

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The first episode I turned on was the one with the 50 Olds coupe. Nice car that could have been a super looking original driver with a little TLC. What turned me off the show was when Richard said it would cost to much to overhaul the 303 engine. So, they spent $2,000 plus for a SBC and TH350. Made me sick to my stomach. Idiots like this need to be cast_ a t _ d just like they do these nice cars!

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I only watched it a couple times and was not impressed,I will watch it if there is nothing else on worth watching and why does a car have to be built in a short time frame and there be a bunch of drama. Its a better show then the one that the junkyard in Arizona did but could be much better.

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I'm to the point now where if I see an old car being worked on on a TV show I immediately change the channel. I don't even bother to find out the name of the show. I just don't want to know what they're going to do to it. It's too painful to watch.

Real car work must make for bad TV.:(

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Fast and Loud - they do the work real FAST but not very well, and the apparent boss talks LOUD but does not care what they do to decent cars as long as he makes a buck. I saw one of their cars close up at the Dallas Mecum auction - what a mess.

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As "bad" as this show might be . . . on many levels . . . I can tolerate it more than what's been on earlier with the Chip Foose and Overhaulin' shows where they took some really nice cars and really butchered them up with lots of nice parts (from major and high quality vendors!) to make for "good television". I saw some very collectible cars whose later value was significantly decreased by what they did to them . . . YUK. Not to mention the "high drama" of their beloved cars allegedly getting stolen! Afterward, the only claim to fame for those poor vehicles was the value of "Done by Foose", with all due respect.

At least the F&L group seem to enjoy what they're doing and end up having some fun out of it all. I do wish the "reality shows" would not do the financial tally at the end of each segment. It makes it look very easy to turn a profit on those things, when it is not really that way in the real world. Kind of amused me that he couldn't get a serious nibble on the '54 (era) Chevy at the Decatur Swap Meet.

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

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