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jhnorco

1931 Plymouth touring sedan value?

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I am wanting to by my first antique car. What do you guys think of this car and what is a good deal for a fully restored car? What should I look for on this type of car?

Thanks for your help!

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I am wanting to by my first antique car. What do you guys think of this car and what is a good deal for a fully restored car? What should I look for on this type of car?

Thanks for your help!

Look for rust between the frame and body. You can take out the wood floor panel and look down or look up from below. That is the usual place for rust. There can also be some between the rear of the body and the splash panel over the gas tank, but it's hard to determine sometimes. Look for a smooth running four cylinder engine, good brakes and you're good to go. Without photos it's VERY hard to tell you what we think it may or may not be worth. John

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My '33 was an upstate NY rust bucket and if it is any indication, in addition to the places keiser31 mentioned, look under the rear fenders to see if there is rust into the rear window area. Rust on the tail edge of the front fenders where they attach to the running boards was another problem on my car.

By the way, I don't believe that the Plymouth called any '31 body style a "touring sedan". That was later in the '30s and denoted a sedan with a built-in trunk. As mentioned in other posts, photos would help to establish what it is and what it might be worth.

For '33 and up and maybe for the earlier four cylinder Plymouths too, you should look very carefully at the trim: Missing or unrepairable trim can be difficult on Plymouths as there is limited reproduction availability unlike for Ford or Chevrolet. In general, for a car to fix up I'd rather get a Plymouth with all the trim in good shape but needing lots of mechanical work than the reverse.

"Fully restored" means different things to different people. And to different clubs. There is a '35 Plymouth coupe in my area that is a AACA senior car but it scored only enough points at a Plymouth Owners Club national meet to get a 3rd. The problem was that there were a number of things that were incorrect for Plymouth but looked period appropriate to the AACA judges. So the AACA judges were going on condition but the POC judges were deducting maximum for incorrect item. Just saying that if judging is in your car's future you might want to consult with local people who are really knowledgable as to not only condition but accuracy. Not to mention the people who put a modern drive train into an old car as part of their "restoration"....

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My '33 was an upstate NY rust bucket and if it is any indication, in addition to the places keiser31 mentioned, look under the rear fenders to see if there is rust into the rear window area. Rust on the tail edge of the front fenders where they attach to the running boards was another problem on my car.

By the way, I don't believe that the Plymouth called any '31 body style a "touring sedan". That was later in the '30s and denoted a sedan with a built-in trunk. As mentioned in other posts, photos would help to establish what it is and what it might be worth.

For '33 and up and maybe for the earlier four cylinder Plymouths too, you should look very carefully at the trim: Missing or unrepairable trim can be difficult on Plymouths as there is limited reproduction availability unlike for Ford or Chevrolet. In general, for a car to fix up I'd rather get a Plymouth with all the trim in good shape but needing lots of mechanical work than the reverse.

"Fully restored" means different things to different people. And to different clubs. There is a '35 Plymouth coupe in my area that is a AACA senior car but it scored only enough points at a Plymouth Owners Club national meet to get a 3rd. The problem was that there were a number of things that were incorrect for Plymouth but looked period appropriate to the AACA judges. So the AACA judges were going on condition but the POC judges were deducting maximum for incorrect item. Just saying that if judging is in your car's future you might want to consult with local people who are really knowledgable as to not only condition but accuracy. Not to mention the people who put a modern drive train into an old car as part of their "restoration"....

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Here is a picture of the car he want $16950.00 for it. what do you think ? all the pictures I have look great but nada says top retail is only $11250.00???

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That's a great looking car from where we sit. If everything is perfect, chrome, paint, interior, mechanicals, and it makes you happy, why not? Be aware these cars are not going to be freeway cruisers, so if your friends all have later era cars, they will leave you behind. I belong to a 1915- 1942 club of all makes, and a WPC club of all years. I bet you can guess which club my 36 likes best!

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Well, it is not exactly fully restored. I see it has 1932 hubcaps on it. It also seems to be missing the shield behind the center bumper medallion, so there may be more incorrect items. Without more photos, hard to tell. I would not be using it on the freeway. Here is an example with the right caps and medallion. I think that the price guide is correct....about $12,000.00 at a glance, if the interior and the rest is correct.

post-37352-143139085805_thumb.jpg

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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would I even be able to drive it on the freeway?

Several years back a fellow I know with a '31 PA sedan and I caravanned to a meet. All stock running gear on that car. He led and set the pace and for about 250 miles, with a stop for gas, he drove it at an average speed of 50.

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Several years back a fellow I know with a '31 PA sedan and I caravanned to a meet. All stock running gear on that car. He led and set the pace and for about 250 miles, with a stop for gas, he drove it at an average speed of 50.
I would give the car a thorough test drive to determine if it can sustain freeway speeds. I have driven 1931 Plymouths and they tend to wind out a bit over 50.

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