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1973 dodge dart


Guest ChrisPatty

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Guest ChrisPatty

having fuel problems. what would cause no fuel to the filter/carb? Have put a new filter, pump and rubber hoses.pretty much everything but the sending unit and steel tubing. someone please help!

Edited by ChrisPatty (see edit history)
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Have you removed the hose from the outlet side of the pump (between the pump and filter/carburetor to see if the pump is actually pumping? If it is not, you may have #1- blockage in the line from the tank, #2- bad fuel pump (even new ones can be faulty), #3- improperly installed fuel pump arm to camshaft. You may also have to pour fuel into the carb to get the flow going.

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Guest ChrisPatty

All hoses changed. except the steel ones. when the car is cold it pumps fine, when it gets to temp it stops pumping. when the filter gets empty, can rev the motor and the filter will fill again. Could it be something as simple as bad gas or water? This is not the only vehicle acting this way.

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All hoses changed. except the steel ones. when the car is cold it pumps fine, when it gets to temp it stops pumping. when the filter gets empty, can rev the motor and the filter will fill again. Could it be something as simple as bad gas or water? This is not the only vehicle acting this way.

What do you mean this is not the only vehicle acting this way? If only on one car, I would check fuel pump pressure with a gauge. This is a mechanical pump,right( as opposed to electric)? Sounds as if when you speed up the pump with RPMs the pump begins to suck from the tank, then push to the Carb. That would denote a bad pump or restriction or air is being sucked into the fuel line anywhere from the tank to the carb. But other vehicles as well! What do they have in common? The fuel? Is the fuel old? Does the car idle when warm, and do this under load? One more thing, does this car have a fuel feed back line,ie, a gas filter with a 5/16 nipple on each end and a 1/4 nipple in the middle. This is to return warm fuel back to the tank to cool off the fuel going to the carb to avoid vapor lock/starvation? Ron

Edited by rons49 (see edit history)
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Guest ChrisPatty

I filled both my truck and the Dart at the same station. I have since stopped getting fuel there. I think it is part of the problem. The truck is a '91 d1500 fuel injected 360 and the Dart is a lazy 6. No feed back line.

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Sound like too much "stuff" in the particular fuel mix. As a point of interest . . . how do they act when you take the gas tank cap off while they're running? Just curious.

ALSO sounds like some blockage/restriction in the idle circuit of the carb. Runs fine until warmed up, but then falters . . . means to me, from my own experience, that as long as the fast idle function is working, the main fuel feed in the carb is from the "main circuit". But when the temps get high enough for the carb to come back to "base idle", the main fuel feed will be through ONLY the idle circuit. I had that issue on my '80 Newport with a Carter 2bbl carb . . . fixed it when I drilled out (gently!) the idle feed restriction orifice enough to get the additional/accumulated restriction "gone".

BUT as it appears this is a fuel related issue, I'd get those vehicles on the road and run that flaky gas out of them! Then refill with a name brand fuel from a high volume gas station. Still, do the run test with the fuel tank cap off and see if it makes any difference, first.

Keep us posted, please.

NTX5467

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Guest ChrisPatty

Tried to run without the gas cap, no difference. There is a clear fuel filter in line before the carb, when the car is cold I can see the fuel pumping , when the car gets to temp, it stops.

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All hoses changed. except the steel ones. when the car is cold it pumps fine, when it gets to temp it stops pumping. when the filter gets empty, can rev the motor and the filter will fill again. Could it be something as simple as bad gas or water? This is not the only vehicle acting this way.

Sounds to me like you need to clean those steel lines out, I note in both posts this is the only thing you have not done. And as to the difference between hot and cold operations, consider that you may have a floating obstruction in the lines; if I was a betting man I would start with the tank end first.

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Thanks for the update.

The "clear" fuel filters which were common on Chrysler products of that vintage do NOT have to show fuel in them for fuel to get to the carb. We might suspect that would be the case, but from my own experiences with such filters on our '66 Chrysler, it's not a "slam dunk deal". There were days it'd be 1/4th full, other days, 2/3rds full, a rare day it'd be 90% full, and on some hot summer days . . . "no" full. Car ran the same in all cases! Kind of showed the wisdom of Chrysler's factory-type fuel filters being "shiney metal", it seemed.

A BETTER gauge of whether or not the carb has sufficient fuel in the float bowl (with a carburetor) is the accelerator pump shot. Best to check with the engine not running, but you can check it by carefully leaning over the fender with the engine running and working the accelerator pedal linkage as you safely watch the venturi area of the carb.

I presume the carb is adjusted to the "label specs" on the emissions control decal under the hood? Hot Idle Speed? Idle mixture?

The reason I was curious about the fuel tank cap was to see if the tank vent system was working. The tank should vent through the emissions "charcoal" canister in the engine compartment. If the vent system was blocked, with the factory non-vented gas cap, the fuel pump would be pulling fuel against a vacuum in the fuel tank.

A mechanical fuel pump is at its highest efficiency at lower engine rpms. Every pump should be a full and strong one. IF you want to flow-check the mechanical fuel pump, you can get a longer fuel line piece of hose and carefully and firmly place it in a suitable receptacle. Then crank the engine for a specified period of time and see how much fuel was collected. You can also plumb a fuel pressure gauge between the pump and the carb, to check for fuel pressure levels at idle and lower speeds--that inline fuel filter would probably be a good location.

Do you have "good" fuel in the tanks yet?

Just some thougths,

NTX5467

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Guest ChrisPatty

In the truck, yes. The problem seems better. It still tries to stall out once in a while, I guess that it is still working out the whatever it is that I picked up. The car won't even make it to a gas station.(yet) The "charcoal" canister is not hooked up, but I do know where it is, would that cause any difficulties?

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The charcoal canister is part of the carburetor's metering calibrations. It collects vapors from the fuel tank and carburetor, then recycles them during certain operating conditions, which relates to the carburetor's ultimate fuel calibrations. The valve which controls it is usually on the top of the canister, with several vacuum lines which supply vacuum biases to determine when "to purge" and such. But it would not cause issues to the degree that you describe them . . . unless you had a full-blown vacuum leak.

WHY is the canister not hooked up? Are there open vacuum ports on the carb, or the vacuum amplifier, etc.? There should be a decal/label under the hood detailing the vacuum line routing for your vehicle/engine combination. UNTIL you get everything hooked back up and the carb adjusted "to factory specs", you could be chasing LOTS of things and finding nothing specific! In the mean time, it sounds like you need some extra 5 gallon fuel cans to drain the Dart's fuel tank into and then put some better fuel in it. Perhaps there's a lawn mower that'll run on it with some fuel additive?

Regards,

NTX5467

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Guest ChrisPatty

The canister has been unhooked to check for leaks it is not been run down the street like that. I am going to try a supplemental tank to find out if it is the gas, or something in the tank, or if it is further forward this weekend. I'll let you know what I find.

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