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karasmer

Split rim tire intall without spreader

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Anybody know of a trick or can a tire be installed without a rim spreader, I tried messing wih the swivel device but no luck. I figured the old farmers had a method of doing these without the proper tool.

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Item Number - 370616296099

Ford Model T Pacific Rim spreader jack tool Chevy Dodge Brothers | eBay

It would help to see photos of the rim and the swivel unit along with the car make and year.

You need the correct zigzag tire wrench. see photo. It makes two 90 degree bends and has a socket for the lugs on one end and a thick tab (that fits into the rim cam) on the other end. This particular tool came with a 1931 Dodge. It is the right tool for the leverage needed to turn that cam on the split rim.

I use a very large screw driver, 1/2 inch bit, to fit in the slot and use a large vise grip to clamp on the screw driver for leverage.

Use of the rim spreader makes it much easier to decrease and increase the rim size.

post-41405-143139077237_thumb.jpg

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The farmers and shade tree mechanics used a short 2X4 inside of the rim so it set below center.And then set the screw jack that came with the car on the 2X4 to push the split rim into place . You can then easily lock the swivel plate. A word caution is to be careful! -- Bob

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The correct tool for any job pays for itself twice: once in doing the job without damaging the parts, and once in doing the job without sending you to the emergency room. Sure, guys have cheated the odds for decades, and you might be one of the lucky ones. But if you can get the correct tool and not spend a fortune, why not do it and save yourself the risk? There's A LOT of force pent up in those split rims--it's essentially a giant spring with sharp edges and pointy ends, and if you're lucky, rusty too!

Signed,

A guy with a 1-inch long valley in his thumb that still hurts 7 years later because he didn't need to go down in the basement to get the stupid blade guard for the table saw

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The correct tool for any job pays for itself twice: once in doing the job without damaging the parts, and once in doing the job without sending you to the emergency room. Sure, guys have cheated the odds for decades, and you might be one of the lucky ones. But if you can get the correct tool and not spend a fortune, why not do it and save yourself the risk? There's A LOT of force pent up in those split rims--it's essentially a giant spring with sharp edges and pointy ends, and if you're lucky, rusty too!

Signed,

A guy with a 1-inch long valley in his thumb that still hurts 7 years later because he didn't need to go down in the basement to get the stupid blade guard for the table saw

Working as a tire buster and brake mechanic for years, I agree totally with Matt.....get the correct tool. The zigzag one I have (and shown) makes the job a breeze.

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My 1927 Reo had that of split rim. With the zigzag tool, it took quite a bit of strength to close the split rim. I had to use a cheater bar to gain extra leverage.

It's not fun. The rim would close, not flush, but at a slight angle. I was afraid the rim edge would eventually scrape its way through the inner inner tube. Took a lot of do-overs and some careful pounding with a heavy hammer.

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Alright I think I may have one of those tools, Thanks

Can you post a photo of it when you find it, please?

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My 1927 Reo had that of split rim. With the zigzag tool, it took quite a bit of strength to close the split rim. I had to use a cheater bar to gain extra leverage.

It's not fun. The rim would close, not flush, but at a slight angle. I was afraid the rim edge would eventually scrape its way through the inner inner tube. Took a lot of do-overs and some careful pounding with a heavy hammer.

Yes.....some rims have to be hit with a hammer to get the bands to meet up flush.

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Keiser, If I aM thinking of the right thing, I have one of those old rim spreader which is useless to me except for a conversation piece. I will try

to post a pic later today, and maybe you can verify I have the thing you refer to. It is rather heavy dury and is shaped something like a heavy

wood and metal fork. I will sell it for $40 plus the shipping, if someone wants it.

Perry

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Does anyone have an extra zigzag wrench that they would part with?

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I guess I did not have the zigzag tool so I took a big screwdriver about 18 inches long with a square shaft and with a crescent wrench opened and closed it with ease. Thanks

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