Sign in to follow this  
28vic

carter carb bb-1

Recommended Posts

I have purchased a carter bb-1 carb for 28 dodge six cyl. It is model 517s. I am hoping to identify the application for this carb hoping to be a good fit for this car. Below model # on tag is f6 with an 8, next square has a stamped out backward L,next square has a stamped out v. carb looks to be in rebuilt or nos condition. I have made an adaptor for intake. carb sits lower and back 1 inch to facilitate perpendicular flange bolt and to clear rear of generator. Thanks, ahead of time for any help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He just told you, he got the wrong carb for the car but made it fit by making an adapter. Now he wants to know if it is the right carb for the car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was checking for original application for this carb. I hope it is appropriate for this car. I would have liked original type replacement but costs have steered me this direction.Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your experts for your car are on the Dodge forum. Try posting there and they can tell you what carbs you will work best.

If I am wrong, some one correct me, I believe the Carter BB1 carburetor was first used on stationery engines to drive pumps, compressors, etc. They hae been used as a good aftermarket carb when the original carb needed replaced.

I have a 1931 Hupmobile that originally came with a Stromburg U2 made with pot metal. My car was purchased with a carter BB1 carb that worked fine. The BB1 does not have a unit for a hand throttle. I used it until I found a reproduction U2.

post-41405-14313906134_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carter made dozens of different type BB-1 carburetors for different ORIGINAL applications.

Carter also made 6 different type BB-1 carburetors for AFTERMARKET USE. The carburetors designed for aftermarket use are:

S.A.E. size 1 - Carter 245s (early), and 245sd (post WWII)

S.A.E. size 2 - Carter BB1A (early), and BB1D (post WWII)

S.A.E. size 3 - Carter 289s (early), and 289sd (post WWII)

The early carbs in the above list have cast iron lower castings, the post WWII units have zinc alloy lower castings.

If one is independently wealthy, or owns a machine shop and the Carter blueprints; any of the various carbs designed for original use (such as the 517s) may be converted to their equivilent S.A.E. size aftermarket unit.

And (no offense meant huptoy), the BB-1 was not designed to use on stationary engines. The first BB-1's came out on 1932 Chrysler products.

Jon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello '28 Dodge,

I purchased a fully restored '30 Chrysler CJ six that came with its original DRT-08 (I think that's the model#) brass bowl carb. After numerous problems even after a quality rebuild, I switched to a BB-1 found on eBay. I hired a machinist to make an adaptor and the car has run great ever since. I was told the BB-1 was first introduced for the '31 Plymouth.

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello '28 Dodge,

I purchased a fully restored '30 Chrysler CJ six that came with its original DRT-08 (I think that's the model#) brass bowl carb. After numerous problems even after a quality rebuild, I switched to a BB-1 found on eBay. I hired a machinist to make an adaptor and the car has run great ever since. I was told the BB-1 was first introduced for the '31 Plymouth.

Jim

I went just the opposite way. My 1931 Dodge had a Carter BB-1, but it kept leaking profusely. Nothing I did could keep it from dripping continually and lower the idle. I switched to a Carter DRT-08 (which my Dodge Brothers material for 1931 shows as the original style) and the car runs like a dream, now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies. I was thrilled to see the carb on the hupmobile. I hope to post a pic of my resurected barn find within a few weeks in running condition. From one enthusiastic old car fan to you who take time to help...keep em running.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I once owned a 28 Dodge Victory 6. They came from the factory with either a potmetal Stromberg carb or a brass Stewart carb. The potmetal Strombergs of that era tended to crack and become junk. While walking the rows at Hershey I found two Stewart carbs. I installed one and sold the other to a fellow in the Dodge club. I suggest joining the DB club and calling everyone in the roster that has the exact car you are seeking parts for. Old rare and obscure parts are in the hands of the guys that own the cars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The brass tag identifies the model of vehicle or engine the carb was fitted to. C for Chrysler and D for Dodge, my carb has C75 with a 6 under it. The 6, I believe, refers to the jets installed. I have seen carbs with C75, C6, DA, DB and D6 tags.

Export Chrysler and Dodge vehicles were commonly fitted with the Carter or Ball and Ball carbs, Strombergs and Tillotsons because the original carbs were too big to fit next to the steering box.

E and F refer to industrial engines. The railway museum in Queensland has a 1930 forklift fitted with a Dodge industrial engine and Ball and Ball BB1 carb. It's tag is E6 with 6 underneath it. Military ground support equipment (Air Force tow motors) with Dodge engines were prefixed with M.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 1928 Studebaker Commander Big Six model GB (354 CID engine) and have fitted a Carter BB1 on it and it runs quite well. See attached photo of the setup.

Stude8post-31139-143139077893_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will let you do the leg work in looking up your specific vehicle and application and going through all the options, but I found my answers here for my 1932 Dodge DL 6:

Mike's Carburetor Parts

My "all original" '32 has a Carter BB2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this